Ecclesiastes 5:12
New International Version
The sleep of a laborer is sweet, whether they eat little or much, but as for the rich, their abundance permits them no sleep.

New Living Translation
People who work hard sleep well, whether they eat little or much. But the rich seldom get a good night's sleep.

English Standard Version
Sweet is the sleep of a laborer, whether he eats little or much, but the full stomach of the rich will not let him sleep.

Berean Study Bible
The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich man permits him no sleep.

New American Standard Bible
The sleep of the working man is pleasant, whether he eats little or much; but the full stomach of the rich man does not allow him to sleep.

King James Bible
The sleep of a labouring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

Christian Standard Bible
The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich permits him no sleep.

Contemporary English Version
If you have to work hard for a living, you can rest well at night, even if you don't have much to eat. But if you are rich, you can't even sleep.

Good News Translation
Workers may or may not have enough to eat, but at least they can get a good night's sleep. The rich, however, have so much that they stay awake worrying.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich permits him no sleep.

International Standard Version
Sweet is the sleep of a working man, whether he eats a little or a lot, but the excess wealth of the rich will not allow him to rest.

NET Bible
The sleep of the laborer is pleasant--whether he eats little or much--but the wealth of the rich will not allow him to sleep.

New Heart English Bible
The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eats little or much; but the abundance of the rich will not allow him to sleep.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
The sleep of working people is sweet, whether they eat a little or a lot. But the full stomachs that rich people have will not allow them to sleep.

JPS Tanakh 1917
Sweet is the sleep of a labouring man, whether he eat little or much; but the satiety of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

New American Standard 1977
The sleep of the working man is pleasant, whether he eats little or much. But the full stomach of the rich man does not allow him to sleep.

Jubilee Bible 2000
The sleep of the servant is sweet whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

King James 2000 Bible
The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eats little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not allow him to sleep.

American King James Version
The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

American Standard Version
The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much; but the fulness of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
The sleep of a servant is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but to one who is satiated with wealth, there is none that suffers him to sleep.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Sleep is sweet to a labouring man, whether he eat lttle or much: but the fulness of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

Darby Bible Translation
The sleep of the labourer is sweet, whether he have eaten little or much; but the fulness of the rich doth not suffer him to sleep.

English Revised Version
The sleep of a labouring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but the fulness of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

Webster's Bible Translation
The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eateth little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

World English Bible
The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eats little or much; but the abundance of the rich will not allow him to sleep.

Young's Literal Translation
Sweet is the sleep of the labourer whether he eat little or much; and the sufficiency of the wealthy is not suffering him to sleep.
Study Bible
The Futility of Wealth
11When good things increase, so do those who consume them; what then is the profit to the owner, except to behold them with his eyes? 12The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich man permits him no sleep. 13There is a grievous evil I have seen under the sun: wealth hoarded to the harm of its owner,…
Cross References
Psalm 127:2
In vain you rise early and stay up late, toiling for bread to eat--for He gives sleep to His beloved.

Proverbs 3:24
When you lie down, you will not be afraid; when you rest, your sleep will be sweet.

Treasury of Scripture

The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.

Psalm 4:8
I will both lay me down in peace, and sleep: for thou, LORD, only makest me dwell in safety.

Psalm 127:2
It is vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: for so he giveth his beloved sleep.

Proverbs 3:24
When thou liest down, thou shalt not be afraid: yea, thou shalt lie down, and thy sleep shall be sweet.







Lexicon
The sleep
שְׁנַ֣ת (šə·naṯ)
Noun - feminine singular construct
Strong's Hebrew 8142: Sleep

of the worker
הָעֹבֵ֔ד (hā·‘ō·ḇêḏ)
Article | Verb - Qal - Participle - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 5647: To work, to serve, till, enslave

is sweet,
מְתוּקָה֙ (mə·ṯū·qāh)
Adjective - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4966: Sweet, sweetness

whether
אִם־ (’im-)
Conjunction
Strong's Hebrew 518: Lo!, whether?, if, although, Oh that!, when, not

he eats
יֹאכֵ֑ל (yō·ḵêl)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 398: To eat

little
מְעַ֥ט (mə·‘aṭ)
Adjective - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 4592: A little, fewness, a few

or
וְאִם־ (wə·’im-)
Conjunctive waw | Conjunction
Strong's Hebrew 518: Lo!, whether?, if, although, Oh that!, when, not

much,
הַרְבֵּ֖ה (har·bêh)
Verb - Hifil - Infinitive absolute
Strong's Hebrew 7235: To be or become much, many or great

but the abundance
וְהַשָּׂבָע֙ (wə·haś·śā·ḇā‘)
Conjunctive waw, Article | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7647: Plenty, satiety

of the rich man
לֶֽעָשִׁ֔יר (le·‘ā·šîr)
Preposition-l, Article | Adjective - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 6223: Rich

permits
מַנִּ֥יחַֽ (man·nî·aḥ)
Verb - Hifil - Participle - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3240: Bestow, cast down, lay down, up, leave off, let alone remain, pacify, place,

him
ל֖וֹ (lōw)
Preposition | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew

no
אֵינֶ֛נּוּ (’ê·nen·nū)
Adverb | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 369: A non-entity, a negative particle

sleep.
לִישֽׁוֹן׃ (lî·šō·wn)
Preposition-l | Verb - Qal - Infinitive construct
Strong's Hebrew 3462: To be slack, languid, sleep, to grow old, stale, inveterate
Verse 12. - Another inconvenience of great wealth - it robs a man of his sleep. The sleep of a laboring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much. The laborer is the husbandman, the tiller of the ground (Genesis 4:2). The Septuagint, with a different pointing, renders δούλου, "slave," which is less appropriate, the fact being generally true of free or bond man. Whether his fare be plentiful or scanty, the honest laborer earns and enjoys his night's rest. But the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep. The allusion is not to the overloading of the stomach, which might occasion sleeplessness in the case of the poor equally with the rich man, but to the cares and anxieties which wealth brings. "Not a soft couch, nor a bedstead overlaid with silver, nor the quietness that exists throughout the house, nor any other circumstance of this nature, are so generally wont to make sleep sweet and pleasant, as that of laboring, and growing weary, and lying down with a disposition to sleep, and very greatly needing it .... Not so the rich. On the contrary, whilst lying on their beds, they are frequently without sleep through the whole night; and, though they devise many schemes, they do not obtain such pleasure" (St. Chrysostom, 'Hom. on Stat.,' 22). The contrast between the grateful sleep of the tired worker and the disturbed rest of the avaricious and moneyed and luxurious has formed a fruitful theme for poets. Thus Horace, 'Carm.,' 3:1.21 -

"Somnus agrestium
Lenis virorum non humiles domes
Fastidit umbrosamque ripam,
Non Zephyris agitata Tempe."


"Yet sleep turns never from the lowly shed
Of humbler-minded men, nor from the eaves
In Tempe's graceful vale is banished,
Where only Zephyrs stir the murmuring leaves."


(Stanley.) And the reverse, 'Sat.,' 1:1.76, sqq. -

"An vigilare metu exanimem, noctesque diesque
Formidare males fures, inccndia, serves,
Ne to compilent fugientes, hoc juvat?"


"But what are your indulgencies? All day,
All night, to watch and shudder with dismay,
Lest ruffians fire your house, or slaves by stealth
Rifle your coffers, and abstract your wealth?
If this be affluence - this her boasted fruit,
Of all such joys may I live destitute."


(Howes.) Comp. Juvenal, 'Sat.,' 10:12, sqq.; 14:304. Shakespeare, 'Henry IV.,' Pt. II., act 3. sc. 1 -

"Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee,
And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber,
Than in the perfumed chambers of the great,
Under the canopies of costly state,
And lulled with sounds of sweetest melody?"
5:9-17 The goodness of Providence is more equally distributed than appears to a careless observer. The king needs the common things of life, and the poor share them; they relish their morsel better than he does his luxuries. There are bodily desires which silver itself will not satisfy, much less will worldly abundance satisfy spiritual desires. The more men have, the better house they must keep, the more servants they must employ, the more guests they must entertain, and the more they will have hanging on them. The sleep of the labourer is sweet, not only because he is tired, but because he has little care to break his sleep. The sleep of the diligent Christian, and his long sleep, are sweet; having spent himself and his time in the service of God, he can cheerfully repose in God as his Rest. But those who have every thing else, often fail to secure a good night's sleep; their abundance breaks their rest. Riches do hurt, and draw away the heart from God and duty. Men do hurt with their riches, not only gratifying their own lusts, but oppressing others, and dealing hardly with them. They will see that they have laboured for the wind, when, at death, they find the profit of their labour is all gone like the wind, they know not whither. How ill the covetous worldling bears the calamities of human life! He does not sorrow to repentance, but is angry at the providence of God, angry at all about him; which doubles his affliction.
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