Acts 1:1
New International Version
In my former book, Theophilus, I wrote about all that Jesus began to do and to teach

New Living Translation
In my first book I told you, Theophilus, about everything Jesus began to do and teach

English Standard Version
In the first book, O Theophilus, I have dealt with all that Jesus began to do and teach,

Berean Study Bible
In my first book, O Theophilus, I wrote about all that Jesus began to do and to teach,

Berean Literal Bible
In the first account I composed, O Theophilus, concerning all the things that Jesus began both to do and to teach,

New American Standard Bible
The first account I composed, Theophilus, about all that Jesus began to do and teach,

King James Bible
The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

Christian Standard Bible
I wrote the first narrative, Theophilus, about all that Jesus began to do and teach

Contemporary English Version
Theophilus, I first wrote to you about all that Jesus did and taught from the very first

Good News Translation
Dear Theophilus: In my first book I wrote about all the things that Jesus did and taught from the time he began his work

Holman Christian Standard Bible
I wrote the first narrative, Theophilus, about all that Jesus began to do and teach

International Standard Version
In my first book, Theophilus, I wrote about everything Jesus did and taught from the beginning,

NET Bible
I wrote the former account, Theophilus, about all that Jesus began to do and teach

New Heart English Bible
The first account I wrote, Theophilus, concerned all that Jesus began both to do and to teach,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
I wrote the former book, Oh Theophila, about all those things that our Lord Yeshua The Messiah began to do and to teach

GOD'S WORD® Translation
In my first book, Theophilus, I wrote about what Jesus began to do and teach. This included everything from the beginning [of his life]

New American Standard 1977
The first account I composed, Theophilus, about all that Jesus began to do and teach,

Jubilee Bible 2000
The former treatise I have made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

King James 2000 Bible
The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

American King James Version
The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

American Standard Version
The former treatise I made, O Theophilus, concerning all that Jesus began both to do and to teach,

Douay-Rheims Bible
THE former treatise I made, O Theophilus, of all things which Jesus began to do and to teach,

Darby Bible Translation
I composed the first discourse, O Theophilus, concerning all things which Jesus began both to do and to teach,

English Revised Version
The former treatise I made, O Theophilus, concerning all that Jesus began both to do and to teach,

Webster's Bible Translation
The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

Weymouth New Testament
My former narrative, Theophilus, dealt with all that Jesus did and taught as a beginning, down to the day on which,

World English Bible
The first book I wrote, Theophilus, concerned all that Jesus began both to do and to teach,

Young's Literal Translation
The former account, indeed, I made concerning all things, O Theophilus, that Jesus began both to do and to teach,
Study Bible
Prologue
1In my first book, O Theophilus, I wrote about all that Jesus began to do and to teach, 2until the day He was taken up to heaven, after giving instructions through the Holy Spirit to the apostles He had chosen.…
Cross References
Luke 1:3
Therefore, having carefully investigated everything from the beginning, it seemed good also to me to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus,

Luke 3:23
Jesus Himself was about thirty years old when He began His ministry. He was known as the son of Joseph, the son of Heli,

Treasury of Scripture

The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

former.

Luke 1:24
And after those days his wife Elisabeth conceived, and hid herself five months, saying,

O Theophilus.

Luke 1:3
It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write unto thee in order, most excellent Theophilus,

of.

Acts 2:22
Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know:

Matthew 4:23,24
And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people…

Matthew 11:5
The blind receive their sight, and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised up, and the poor have the gospel preached to them.







Lexicon
In my
Τὸν (Ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

first
πρῶτον (prōton)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4413: First, before, principal, most important. Contracted superlative of pro; foremost.

book,
λόγον (logon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3056: From lego; something said; by implication, a topic, also reasoning or motive; by extension, a computation; specially, the Divine Expression.

O
(ō)
Interjection
Strong's Greek 5599: A primary interjection; as a sign of the vocative case, O; as a note of exclamation, oh.

Theophilus,
Θεόφιλε (Theophile)
Noun - Vocative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2321: From theos and philos; friend of God; Theophilus, a Christian.

I wrote
ἐποιησάμην (epoiēsamēn)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Middle - 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4160: (a) I make, manufacture, construct, (b) I do, act, cause. Apparently a prolonged form of an obsolete primary; to make or do.

about
περὶ (peri)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 4012: From the base of peran; properly, through, i.e. Around; figuratively with respect to; used in various applications, of place, cause or time.

all
πάντων (pantōn)
Adjective - Genitive Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3956: All, the whole, every kind of. Including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole.

that
ὧν (hōn)
Personal / Relative Pronoun - Genitive Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3739: Who, which, what, that.

Jesus
Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2424: Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites.

began
ἤρξατο (ērxato)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Middle - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 756: To begin. Middle voice of archo; to commence.

to do
ποιεῖν (poiein)
Verb - Present Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 4160: (a) I make, manufacture, construct, (b) I do, act, cause. Apparently a prolonged form of an obsolete primary; to make or do.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

to teach,
διδάσκειν (didaskein)
Verb - Present Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 1321: To teach, direct, admonish. A prolonged form of a primary verb dao; to teach.
The Acts of the Apostles.--See Introduction as to the title thus given to the Book.

(1) The former treatise.--Literally, word, or discourse; but the English of the text is, perhaps, a happier equivalent than either. The Greek term had been used by Xenophon (Anab. ii. 1; Cyrop. viii. 1, 2) as St. Luke uses it, of what we should call the several "Books" or portions of his Histories. The adjective is strictly "first" rather than "former," and the tense of the verb, "I made," rather than "I have made."

O Theophilus.--See Note on Luke 1:3. It has been thought that the absence of the words "most excellent" implies that the writer's friendship with Theophilus was now of a more intimate and familiar nature. It is possible, just as a like change of relation has been traced in Shakespeare's dedication of his two poems to the Earl of Southampton, but the inference is, in each case, somewhat precarious.

That Jesus began both to do and teach.--The verb "begin" is specially characteristic of St. Luke's Gospel, in which it occurs not less than thirty-one times. Its occurrence at the beginning of the Acts is, accordingly, as far as it goes, an indication of identity of authorship. He sought his materials from those who had been "from the beginning" eye-witnesses and ministers of the word (Luke 1:2).

Verse 1. - I made for have I made, A.V.; concerning for of, A.V.; to teach for teach, A.V. The former treatise; literally, the first history, narrative, or discourse. The form of the Greek, τὸν μὲν τρῶτον, shows that the writer had in his mind at the time to contrast the second history, which he was just beginning, and that naturally τὸν δὲ δεύτερον or τοῦτον δὲ τὸν λόγον, ought both grammatically and logically, to have followed. But the mention of "the apostles whom he had chosen" drew him, as it were, into the stem of his history before he was able to describe it. O Theophilus. The omission of the title "most excellent," given to Theophilus in the Gospel (Luke 1:3), is one among other indications that the publication of the Acts followed very closely upon that of the Gospel. Began both to do and to teach Some take the phrase as equivalent to did and taught; others supply the sense and continued until the day, etc.; or, which is the same thing, supply the terminus a quo, making the whole sense equivalent to "all that Jesus did and taught from the beginning until the day," etc.; others again, as Bishop Wordsworth, gather St. Luke's meaning to be that in the Acts he is about to narrate the continuance by our Lord in heaven of the work which he only began on earth. Meyer thinks that, by the insertion of the word "began," the thing said or done "is in a vivid and graphic manner denoted according to its moment of commencement;" so that our Lord is represented as at one time actively beginning to heal, then to teach, then to walk on the sea, and so on. But the words "began" and "until the day" certainly suggest the beginning and the ending of our Lord's ministry, or rather the whole ministry from its beginning to its end, so that the meaning would be "of all that Jesus did and taught from first to last." To do and to teach. So the disciples on the way to Emmaus speak of Jesus as "a Prophet mighty in deed and word" (Luke 24:19). Compare the stress laid upon the works of Christ in Acts 10:38, 39. 1:1-5 Our Lord told the disciples the work they were to do. The apostles met together at Jerusalem; Christ having ordered them not to depart thence, but to wait for the pouring out of the Holy Spirit. This would be a baptism by the Holy Ghost, giving them power to work miracles, and enlightening and sanctifying their souls. This confirms the Divine promise, and encourages us to depend upon it, that we have heard it from Christ; for in Him all the promises of God are yea and amen.
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