Matthew 18:24
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New International Version
As he began the settlement, a man who owed him ten thousand bags of gold was brought to him.

New Living Translation
In the process, one of his debtors was brought in who owed him millions of dollars.

English Standard Version
When he began to settle, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents.

Berean Study Bible
As he began the settlements, a debtor was brought to him owing ten thousand talents.

Berean Literal Bible
And he having begun to settle, one was brought to him, a debtor of ten thousand talents.

New American Standard Bible
"When he had begun to settle them, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him.

King James Bible
And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When he began to settle accounts, one who owed 10,000 talents was brought before him.

International Standard Version
When he had begun to settle the accounts, a person who owed him 10,000 talents was brought to him.

NET Bible
As he began settling his accounts, a man who owed ten thousand talents was brought to him.

New Heart English Bible
When he had begun to reconcile, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And when he began to take it, they brought him one who owed 10,000 talents.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When he began to do this, a servant who owed him millions of dollars was brought to him.

New American Standard 1977
“And when he had begun to settle them, there was brought to him one who owed him ten thousand talents.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him who owed him ten thousand talents.

King James 2000 Bible
And when he had begun the reckoning, one was brought unto him, who owed him ten thousand talents.

American King James Version
And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought to him, which owed him ten thousand talents.

American Standard Version
And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, that owed him ten thousand talents.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And when he had begun to take the account, one was brought to him, that owed him ten thousand talents.

Darby Bible Translation
And having begun to reckon, one debtor of ten thousand talents was brought to him.

English Revised Version
And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents.

Webster's Bible Translation
And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents.

Weymouth New Testament
But as soon as he began the settlement, one was brought before him who owed 10,000 talents,

World English Bible
When he had begun to reconcile, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents.

Young's Literal Translation
and he having begun to take account, there was brought near to him one debtor of a myriad of talents,
Study Bible
The Unforgiving Servant
23Because of this, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants. 24As he began the settlements, a debtor was brought to him owing ten thousand talents. 25Since the man was unable to pay, the master ordered that he be sold to pay his debt, along with his wife and children and everything he owned.…
Cross References
1 Chronicles 29:7
and for the service for the house of God they gave 5,000 talents and 10,000 darics of gold, and 10,000 talents of silver, and 18,000 talents of brass, and 100,000 talents of iron.

Matthew 18:23
Because of this, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

Matthew 18:25
Since the man was unable to pay, the master ordered that he be sold to pay his debt, along with his wife and children and everything he owned.

Matthew 25:15
To one he gave five talents, to another two talents, and to another one talent--each according to his own ability. And he promptly went on his journey.

Matthew 25:16
The servant who had received five talents went and put them to work, and gained five more.

Matthew 25:20
The servant who had received five talents came and presented five more. 'Master,' he said, 'you entrusted me with five talents. See, I have gained five more.'

Matthew 25:22
Then the servant who had received two talents also came and said, 'Master, you entrusted me with two talents. See, I have gained two more.'

Matthew 25:24
Finally, the servant who had received one talent came and said, 'Master, I knew that you are a hard man, reaping where you have not sown, and gathering where you have not scattered seed.
Treasury of Scripture

And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought to him, which owed him ten thousand talents.

owed.

Luke 7:41,42 There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed …

Luke 13:4 Or those eighteen, on whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them…

Luke 16:5,7 So he called every one of his lord's debtors to him, and said to …

ten thousand. [Murias talanton,] a myriad of talents, the highest number known in Greek arithmetical notation. According to Prideaux, the Roman talent was equal to

1 Chronicles 29:7 And gave for the service of the house of God of gold five thousand …

Ezra 9:6 And said, O my God, I am ashamed and blush to lift up my face to …

Psalm 38:4 For my iniquities are gone over my head: as an heavy burden they …

Psalm 40:12 For innumerable evils have compassed me about: my iniquities have …

Psalm 130:3,4 If you, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who shall stand…

talents. 'A talent is

(24) Ten thousand talents.--It is hardly necessary to discuss in detail the value in modern coinage of the sum thus described. Assuming the Greek "talent" to have been rightly used by the LXX. translators for the Hebrew kikar in Exodus 38:25-26, we have a basis of calculation which makes the talent equal to 3,000 shekels; and taking the shekel as equal to four drachm, this makes the 10,000 talents about 2,500,000 sterling. The sum is evidently named in its vague vastness to indicate the immensity of the debt which man owes to God, the absolute impossibility of his ever clearing off the aggregate, ever-accumulating, of sins of omission and commission which are brought home to his conscience when God "takes account" with him.

Verse 24. - When he had begun to reckon. This is the same word which is rendered "take account" in the previous verse, and means to compare receipts, expenditure, and balance. One was brought unto him. The defaulter did not come of himself and own his delinquency, but was brought into his lord's presence, probably by some who had discovered his defalcations, and desired to see him punished. Otherwise the phrase may refer merely to Oriental etiquette, according to which no one can cuter the royal presence without being formally allowed the interview, and ceremoniously introduced. Ten thousand talents. It is uncertain what is here meant by a talent, whether of silver or gold, of Jewish, or Attic, or Syriac standard; and, of course, the amount intended is variously understood. We must refer to the Bible dictionaries for an explanation of the term "talent," merely remarking here that the highest estimate would give six millions of our pounds, and the lowest more than half that amount. This huge stun must represent the total revenues of a province, and the debtor must have been a high and much-trusted official. It is used by our Lord to signify the infinite debt the sinner owes to God. Thus in the Lord's Prayer we have, "Forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors" (Matthew 6:12). And when he had begun to reckon,.... To open the book of conscience, and to bring to account by some awakening providence, and strong conviction: one was brought unto him; whether he would or no, through the force of an awakened conscience, under guilt and terror;

which owed him ten thousand talents; which must be understood, either of gold, or silver: a talent of silver contained 3,000 shekels, as appears from Exodus 38:25, and was in value of our money 375l. but a talent of gold was equal to 4,500l. of our (f) money. According to Dr. Prideaux (g), a talent of silver was 450l. and a talent of gold, the proportion of gold to silver being reckoned as sixteen to one, was 7,200l. and according to Bishop Cumberland, a talent of silver was 353l. 11s. 10d. ob. and a talent of gold of the same weight, was 5,075l. 15s. 7d. ob. The whole, according to Dr. Hammond, was a thousand eight hundred seventy five thousand pounds, reckoning them silver talents; but if talents of gold are meant, what an immense sum must ten thousand of them be! According to some, seventy two millions sterling. The design of the phrase, is to set forth the exceeding greatness of the debt. Munster's Hebrew Gospel reads it, "ten thousand manehs", or pounds; and so the Persic version: now the value of a maneh of gold, was 75l. and of silver, 7l 10s. (h) take the sum in the least quantity and value, it was exceeding large. The Arabic version renders it a "sum of talents", without mentioning the number, and may mean an innumerable one. Mention is made of such a number of talents of silver, in Esther 3:9, which Aben Ezra says is defective, and signifies ten thousand thousand talents. The "second" Targum on the place says, that the sum of six hundred thousand zuzim, drachms, or pence (i.e. Roman ones) is ten thousand talents of silver. These "ten thousand talents" intend sins, which are called debts, in Scripture; not that they are properly so, or owing to God, for then it would be right to pay them, but because they bind over to punishment. All men owe a debt of thankfulness to God, for their beings, the preservation of them, and all the mercies of life; and a debt of obedience to the whole law, in failure of which, they are obliged to punishment: hence every sin becomes a debt, and these are numerous; indwelling sin, and the lusts thereof, are innumerable; as are actual sins and transgressions, they are more than the hairs of a man's head, and are fitly expressed, both for the weight and quantity of them, by "ten thousand talents". In this light they appear to the conscience of an awakened sinner, who sees that he has been doing nothing but sin, all the days of his life; and that he has been continually breaking the law, one precept or another of it, in thought, word, or deed: which violations of the law, even in word and deed, are risen up to so great a sum, that he is not able to give it to any nearness, and with any exactness; he cannot understand all his errors, nor express the full number of them, or declare all their aggravated circumstances; besides the swarms of corruption of internal lusts and sins, which he observes dwelling in his heart, and are as innumerable as the motes and atoms in a sunbeam. The sins of God's people, which have been all made to meet upon Christ, have been laid upon him by his Father's imputation of them to him, with his own consent, are represented in this manner; see Psalm 40:12. And indeed, if the debts of one of them amount to ten thousand talents, what must the sum of all be, put together! and how great must be the strength and power of Christ, to bear the weight of these sins, and not be broken or discouraged, and fail, as he did not! and what a rich virtue and efficacy must there be in his blood, to pay off all these debts, and make satisfaction for them, which could never have been done, if he had not done it! for, it is impossible that a person in such circumstances as here described, should ever be able to recover himself, or pay his debts, as follows.

(f) Brerewood de Nummis Heb. c. 4. (g) Connection, Vol. 1. Preface, p. 20. (h) Brerewood de Numuis. Heb. c. 4. 24. And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents—If Attic talents are here meant, 10,000 of them would amount to above a million and a half sterling; if Jewish talents, to a much larger sum.18:21-35 Though we live wholly on mercy and forgiveness, we are backward to forgive the offences of our brethren. This parable shows how much provocation God has from his family on earth, and how untoward his servants are. There are three things in the parable: 1. The master's wonderful clemency. The debt of sin is so great, that we are not able to pay it. See here what every sin deserves; this is the wages of sin, to be sold as a slave. It is the folly of many who are under strong convictions of their sins, to fancy they can make God satisfaction for the wrong they have done him. 2. The servant's unreasonable severity toward his fellow-servant, notwithstanding his lord's clemency toward him. Not that we may make light of wronging our neighbour, for that is also a sin against God; but we should not aggravate our neighbour's wronging us, nor study revenge. Let our complaints, both of the wickedness of the wicked, and of the afflictions of the afflicted, be brought to God, and left with him. 3. The master reproved his servant's cruelty. The greatness of sin magnifies the riches of pardoning mercy; and the comfortable sense of pardoning mercy, does much to dispose our hearts to forgive our brethren. We are not to suppose that God actually forgives men, and afterwards reckons their guilt to them to condemn them; but this latter part of the parable shows the false conclusions many draw as to their sins being pardoned, though their after-conduct shows that they never entered into the spirit, or experienced the sanctifying grace of the gospel. We do not forgive our offending brother aright, if we do not forgive from the heart. Yet this is not enough; we must seek the welfare even of those who offend us. How justly will those be condemned, who, though they bear the Christian name, persist in unmerciful treatment of their brethren! The humbled sinner relies only on free, abounding mercy, through the ransom of the death of Christ. Let us seek more and more for the renewing grace of God, to teach us to forgive others as we hope for forgiveness from him.
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