Luke 16:5
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
"So he called in each one of his master's debtors. He asked the first, 'How much do you owe my master?'

New Living Translation
"So he invited each person who owed money to his employer to come and discuss the situation. He asked the first one, 'How much do you owe him?'

English Standard Version
So, summoning his master’s debtors one by one, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’

Berean Study Bible
And he called in each one of his master's debtors. 'How much do you owe my master?' he asked the first.

Berean Literal Bible
And having summoned each one of his master's debtors, he was saying to the first, 'How much do you owe to my master?'

New American Standard Bible
"And he summoned each one of his master's debtors, and he began saying to the first, 'How much do you owe my master?'

King James Bible
So he called every one of his lord's debtors unto him, and said unto the first, How much owest thou unto my lord?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"So he summoned each one of his master's debtors. How much do you owe my master?' he asked the first one.

International Standard Version
"So he called for each of his master's debtors. He asked the first, 'How much do you owe my master?'

NET Bible
So he contacted his master's debtors one by one. He asked the first, 'How much do you owe my master?'

New Heart English Bible
Calling each one of his lord's debtors to him, he said to the first, 'How much do you owe to my lord?'

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
“And he called each one who was indebted to his lord and he said to the first, 'How much do you owe to my lord?' “

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"So the manager called for each one of his master's debtors. He said to the first, 'How much do you owe my master?'

New American Standard 1977
“And he summoned each one of his master’s debtors, and he began saying to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’

Jubilee Bible 2000
So he called each one of his lord's debtors unto him and said unto the first, How much dost thou owe unto my lord?

King James 2000 Bible
So he called every one of his lord's debtors unto him, and said unto the first, How much owe you unto my lord?

American King James Version
So he called every one of his lord's debtors to him, and said to the first, How much owe you to my lord?

American Standard Version
And calling to him each one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first, How much owest thou unto my lord?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Therefore calling together every one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first: How much dost thou owe my lord?

Darby Bible Translation
And having called to [him] each one of the debtors of his own lord, he said to the first, How much owest thou to my lord?

English Revised Version
And calling to him each one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first, How much owest thou unto my lord?

Webster's Bible Translation
So he called every one of his lord's debtors, and said to the first, How much owest thou to my lord?

Weymouth New Testament
"So he called all his master's debtors, one by one, and asked the first, 'How much are you in debt to my master?'

World English Bible
Calling each one of his lord's debtors to him, he said to the first, 'How much do you owe to my lord?'

Young's Literal Translation
'And having called near each one of his lord's debtors, he said to the first, How much dost thou owe to my lord?
Study Bible
The Parable of the Shrewd Manager
4I know what I will do, so that after my removal from management, people will welcome me into their homes...’ 5And he called in each one of his master’s debtors. ‘How much do you owe my master?’ he asked the first. 6‘A hundred measures of olive oil,’ he answered. ‘Take your bill,’ said the manager. ‘Sit down quickly, and write fifty.’…
Cross References
Matthew 6:12
And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors;

Matthew 18:28
But when that servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred denarii. He grabbed him and began to choke him, saying, 'Pay back what you owe me.'

Luke 16:4
I know what I will do, so that after my removal from management, people will welcome me into their homes. . .'

Luke 16:6
A hundred measures of olive oil,' he answered. 'Take your bill,' said the manager. 'Sit down quickly, and write fifty.'
Treasury of Scripture

So he called every one of his lord's debtors to him, and said to the first, How much owe you to my lord?

his.

Luke 7:41,42 There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed …

Matthew 18:24 And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought to him, which owed …

(5) So he called every one of his lord's debtors.--The debtors might be either men who had bought their wheat and their oil at the hands of the steward; or, as the sequel renders more probable, tenants who, after the common custom of the East, paid their rent in kind. Who, we ask, are the "debtors," in the interpretation of the parable? The Lord's Prayer supplies the answer to that question. The "debtors" are those who have sinned against God, who have left undone the things which they were bound to do, who have made no return for the outward blessings they have received. The unfaithful Church or party tries to secure its position by working on the lower nature of those who have the sense of that burden upon them. It neither gives the sense of peace or pardon, nor asserts the righteous severity of God's commandments. It keeps their consciences uneasy, and traffics in its absolutions.

Verses 5, 6, and 7 simply paint in the details of the interesting picture of the parable. This singular plan of providing for himself by becoming a benefactor of the debtor, remarks Professor Bruce, was by no means the only possible one under the circumstances; but the Speaker of the parable made his hero make choice of it as the aim of the imaginary narrative was to teach the value of beneficence as a passport into the eternal habitations. Various explanations have been suggested to account for the difference in the gifts to the debtors. It is probable that when our Lord spoke the parable, reasons for these varied gifts were given, such as the circumstances of the debtors. It is scarcely now worth while to frame ingenious guesses respecting the details, which apparently do not affect the grand lessons which the story was intended to teach. So he called every one of his Lord's debtors,.... Either the Gentiles, who were greatly indebted to God, having sinned against him, and the law, and light of nature, at a great rate; into whose affections, houses, and palaces, the Jews found ways and means to introduce themselves; and, in process of time, got leave to have synagogues built, and their worship set up again: or else the Jews, their countrymen; since these were under those stewards, tutors, and governors, and were debtors to do the whole law; and had, by breaking the law, contracted large debts; and against whom the ceremonial law stood as an handwriting: these the steward called

unto him, and said unto the first, how much owest thou unto my Lord? and it is observable, that the debts of these men, of the first, lay in oil, and of the other in wheat; things much used in the ceremonial law, in the observance of which they had been, greatly deficient; see 5-7. fifty … fourscore—deducting a half from the debt of the one, and a fifth from that of the other.16:1-12 Whatever we have, the property of it is God's; we have only the use of it, according to the direction of our great Lord, and for his honour. This steward wasted his lord's goods. And we are all liable to the same charge; we have not made due improvement of what God has trusted us with. The steward cannot deny it; he must make up his accounts, and be gone. This may teach us that death will come, and deprive us of the opportunities we now have. The steward will make friends of his lord's debtors or tenants, by striking off a considerable part of their debt to his lord. The lord referred to in this parable commended not the fraud, but the policy of the steward. In that respect alone is it so noticed. Worldly men, in the choice of their object, are foolish; but in their activity, and perseverance, they are often wiser than believers. The unjust steward is not set before us as an example in cheating his master, or to justify any dishonesty, but to point out the careful ways of worldly men. It would be well if the children of light would learn wisdom from the men of the world, and would as earnestly pursue their better object. The true riches signify spiritual blessings; and if a man spends upon himself, or hoards up what God has trusted to him, as to outward things, what evidence can he have, that he is an heir of God through Christ? The riches of this world are deceitful and uncertain. Let us be convinced that those are truly rich, and very rich, who are rich in faith, and rich toward God, rich in Christ, in the promises; let us then lay up our treasure in heaven, and expect our portion from thence.
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NT Gospels: Luke 16:5 Calling each one of his lord's debtors (Luke Lu Lk) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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