Hebrews 2:12
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
He says, "I will declare your name to my brothers and sisters; in the assembly I will sing your praises."

New Living Translation
For he said to God, "I will proclaim your name to my brothers and sisters. I will praise you among your assembled people."

English Standard Version
saying, “I will tell of your name to my brothers; in the midst of the congregation I will sing your praise.”

Berean Study Bible
He says: "I will proclaim Your name to My brothers; I will sing Your praises in the congregation."

Berean Literal Bible
saying: "I will declare Your name to My brothers; in the midst of the congregation I will sing Your praises."

New American Standard Bible
saying, "I WILL PROCLAIM YOUR NAME TO MY BRETHREN, IN THE MIDST OF THE CONGREGATION I WILL SING YOUR PRAISE."

King James Bible
Saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
saying: I will proclaim Your name to My brothers; I will sing hymns to You in the congregation.

International Standard Version
when he says, "I will announce your name to my brothers. I will praise you within the congregation."

NET Bible
saying, "I will proclaim your name to my brothers; in the midst of the assembly I will praise you."

New Heart English Bible
saying, "I will declare your name to my brothers. In the midst of the assembly I will praise you.."

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
When he said, “I shall announce your name to my brethren and within the church I shall glorify you.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
He says, "I will tell my people about your name. I will praise you within the congregation."

New American Standard 1977
saying,
            “I WILL PROCLAIM THY NAME TO MY BRETHREN,
            IN THE MIDST OF THE CONGREGATION I WILL SING THY PRAISE.”



Jubilee Bible 2000
saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren; in the midst of the congregation I will praise thee.

King James 2000 Bible
Saying, I will declare your name unto my brethren, in the midst of the congregation will I sing praise unto you.

American King James Version
Saying, I will declare your name to my brothers, in the middle of the church will I sing praise to you.

American Standard Version
saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, In the midst of the congregation will I sing thy praise.

Douay-Rheims Bible
I will declare thy name to my brethren; in the midst of the church will I praise thee.

Darby Bible Translation
saying, I will declare thy name to my brethren; in [the] midst of [the] assembly will I sing thy praises.

English Revised Version
saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, In the midst of the congregation will I sing thy praise.

Webster's Bible Translation
Saying, I will declare thy name to my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise to thee.

Weymouth New Testament
as when He says: "I will proclaim Thy name to My brothers: in the midst of the congregation I will hymn Thy praises;"

World English Bible
saying, "I will declare your name to my brothers. In the midst of the congregation I will sing your praise."

Young's Literal Translation
saying, 'I will declare Thy name to my brethren, in the midst of an assembly I will sing praise to Thee;' and again, 'I will be trusting on Him;'

Study Bible
Jesus Like His Brothers
11For both the One who sanctifies and those who are sanctified are of the same family. That is why Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers. 12He says: “I will proclaim Your name to My brothers; I will sing Your praises in the congregation.” 13And again: “I will put My trust in Him.” And once again: “Here am I, and the children God has given Me.”…
Cross References
Psalm 22:22
I will tell of Your name to my brethren; In the midst of the assembly I will praise You.

Hebrews 12:23
in joyful assembly, to the congregation of the firstborn, enrolled in heaven. You have come to God the judge of all men, to the spirits of the righteous made perfect,
Treasury of Scripture

Saying, I will declare your name to my brothers, in the middle of the church will I sing praise to you.

I will.

Psalm 22:22,25 I will declare your name to my brothers: in the middle of the congregation …

in.

Psalm 40:10 I have not hid your righteousness within my heart; I have declared …

Psalm 111:1 Praise you the LORD. I will praise the LORD with my whole heart, …

John 18:20 Jesus answered him, I spoke openly to the world; I ever taught in …

(12) I will declare thy name . . . .--The quotation is taken (with very slight variation) from the 22nd verse of Psalms 22 (Psalm 22:22)--a Psalm remarkable for its close connection with the narratives of the Passion of our Lord. Whether the inscription which speaks of David as author is correct, or whether (from the difficulty of discovering any period in David's history to which the expressions used can apply) we consider the Psalm to have been written after the Captivity, there can be no doubt of its Messianic character. Some would class this Psalm with Psalms 110 (see Note on Hebrews 1:13), as simply and directly prophetic, having no historic foreground; but the language of some of the verses is so definite and peculiar that we must certainly regard it as descriptive of actual experience, and must rather regard the Psalm (comp. Hebrews 1:8-9) as typically prophetic of Christ. Each division of this verse is in point as a quotation. (1) Those to whom the Messiah will declare God's name He speaks of as "brethren;" (2) not alone, but in the "church" (or rather, in a congregation of God's people; see Psalm 22:22) will He sing the praise of God. The latter thought--community with men, as attested by a like relation to God--is brought out with still greater prominence in Hebrews 2:13.

Verse 12. - I will declare thy Name unto my brethren, in the midst of the Church (or, congregation) will I sing praise unto thee. This first citation is from Psalm 22:22, quoted, it would seem, from memory or from a text of the LXX. different from ours, διηγήσομαι being changed to ἀπαγγελῶ, but with no difference of meaning. The psalm is attributed by tradition to David, being entitled "a psalm of David." Delitzsch and Ebrard accept it as certainly his, concluding, from its position in the first book of the psalms (1-72.), that it was included in the collection made by David himself (cf. 2 Chronicles 23:18 with Psalm 72:20). Others, as recently Perowne, think that the fact of the suffering and humiliation described, being beyond any experienced by David himself, points to some other unknown author. The conclusion, however, does not necessarily follow. David, writing "in Spirit," when under persecution by Saul, may be conceived as drawing a picture, with regard both to present humiliation and to expected triumph, beyond the facts of his own case, taking his own experience as typical of a higher fulfillment. And the minute details of the suffering described, answering so remarkably to the circumstances of the Crucifixion, certainly suggest the idea of a distinct prophetic vision. Still, there is no reason for concluding that the psalm was not, like other Messianic psalms, suggested by and founded on the writer's own circumstances and experience. Detitzsch says well, "The way of sorrows by which David mounted to his earthly throne was a type of that Via Dolorosa by which Jesus, the Son of David, passed before ascending to the right hand of the Father." There is no psalm of which the ultimate Messianic reference is to Christian believers more undoubted. The first words of it were uttered by Jesus himself from the cross (Matthew 27:46); and for its fulfillment in him, recognized by the evangelists, see Matthew 27:39, 43; John 19:23, 28. The general purport of the psalm is as follows: A persecuted sufferer, under a feeling of being forsaken by God, pours out his complaint, and prays for succor; suddenly, at the end of ver. 21, the tone of the psalm changes into one of confident anticipation of deliverance and triumph, when the psalmist shall praise the Lord in the congregation of his brethren, when all that fear the Lord shall join him in praise, when the "ends of the earth" shall turn to the Lord, and "all the families of the nations" shall worship with Israel. The close agreement of the latter part of the psalm with the Messianic anticipations of prophecy is obvious, and would in itself determine its Messianic import. The marked difference between this psalm and those previously quoted is that the typical psalmist appears here as a human sufferer previously to his triumph, thus anticipating the similar view of the Messiah in prophecy, as notably in Isaiah lilt. And hence this psalm is suitably quoted here as a striking and early anticipation of a Messiah "perfected through sufferings," and associated in sympathy with human "brethren," the verse actually quoted, in which "he is not ashamed to call them brethren," being sufficient to remind the readers of the whole of this aspect of Messianic prophecy. Saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren,.... These words, with the following clause, are cited from Psalm 22:22 as a proof of what the apostle had before asserted; and that this psalm is to be understood, not of the Jewish nation, or people of Israel, nor of Esther, nor of David, but of the Messiah, appears from the title of it, "Aijeleth, Shahar", which signifies "the morning hind"; from the particular account of Christ's sufferings in it; from his several offices herein pointed to; from the conversion of the Gentiles it prophesies of; and from several passages cited from hence, and applied to Christ; see Matthew 27:35. And these are the words of Christ addressed to his Father; whose name he promises to declare to his brethren; meaning not the Jews, in general, his brethren according to the flesh; but his disciples and followers, particularly the twelve apostles, and the five hundred brethren to whom he appeared after his resurrection; and indeed all the saints and people of God may be included: and by his name he would declare to them, is not meant any particular name of his, as Elohim, El-shaddai, Jehovah, or the like; but rather he himself, and the perfections of his nature, which he, the only begotten Son, lying in his bosom, has declared; though the Gospel seems chiefly to be designed; see John 17:6 and this Christ declared with great exactness and accuracy, with clearness and perspicuity, and with all integrity and fidelity: he spoke it out plainly, and concealed no part of it; as he received it from his Father, he faithfully made it known to his people; this is expressive of Christ's prophetic office, of his preaching of the Gospel, both in his own person, and by his ministers:

in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee; or "a hymn"; this is to be understood not of the church above, but of the church below; and not of the synagogue of the Jews, but of the disciples of Christ, and of his singing an hymn to God, with and among them, as he did at the institution of the supper, Matthew 26:30 for though the number of the apostles was but small, yet they made a congregation or church, and which was a pure and glorious one. With the Jews (h), ten men made a congregation.

(h) Misn. Sanhedrin, c. 1. sect. 6. 12. (Ps 22:22.) Messiah declares the name of the Father, not known fully as Christ's Father, and therefore their Father, till after His crucifixion (Joh 20:17), among His brethren ("the Church," that is, the congregation), that they in turn may praise Him (Ps 22:23). At Ps 22:22, which begins with Christ's cry, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" and details minutely His sorrows, passes from Christ's sufferings to His triumph, prefigured by the same in the experience of David.

will I sing—as leader of the choir (Ps 8:2).2:10-13 Whatever the proud, carnal, and unbelieving may imagine or object, the spiritual mind will see peculiar glory in the cross of Christ, and be satisfied that it became Him, who in all things displays his own perfections in bringing many sons to glory, to make the Author of their salvation perfect through sufferings. His way to the crown was by the cross, and so must that of his people be. Christ sanctifies; he has purchased and sent the sanctifying Spirit: the Spirit sanctifies as the Spirit of Christ. True believers are sanctified, endowed with holy principles and powers, set apart to high and holy uses and purposes. Christ and believers are all of one heavenly Father, who is God. They are brought into relation with Christ. But the words, his not being ashamed to call them brethren, express the high superiority of Christ to the human nature. This is shown from three texts of Scripture. See Ps 22:22; 18:2; Isa 8:18.
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