Matthew 24:36
New International Version
"But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.

New Living Translation
"However, no one knows the day or hour when these things will happen, not even the angels in heaven or the Son himself. Only the Father knows.

English Standard Version
“But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father only.

Berean Study Bible
No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.

Berean Literal Bible
But concerning that day and hour, no one knows, not even the angels of the heavens, nor the Son, except the Father only.

New American Standard Bible
"But of that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father alone.

King James Bible
But of that day and hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

Christian Standard Bible
"Now concerning that day and hour no one knows--neither the angels of heaven nor the Son--except the Father alone.

Contemporary English Version
No one knows the day or hour. The angels in heaven don't know, and the Son himself doesn't know. Only the Father knows.

Good News Translation
"No one knows, however, when that day and hour will come--neither the angels in heaven nor the Son; the Father alone knows.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"Now concerning that day and hour no one knows--neither the angels in heaven, nor the Son--except the Father only.

International Standard Version
"No one knows when that day or hour will come —not the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father,

NET Bible
"But as for that day and hour no one knows it--not even the angels in heaven--except the Father alone.

New Heart English Bible
But no one knows of that day and hour, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but my Father only.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But about that day and about that hour no one knows, not even the Angels of Heaven, but The Father alone.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"No one knows when that day or hour will come. Even the angels in heaven and the Son don't know. Only the Father knows.

New American Standard 1977
“But of that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father alone.

Jubilee Bible 2000
But of that day and hour no one knows, no, not even the angels of the heavens, but my Father only.

King James 2000 Bible
But of that day and hour knows no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

American King James Version
But of that day and hour knows no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

American Standard Version
But of that day and hour knoweth no one, not even the angels of heaven, neither the Son, but the Father only.

Douay-Rheims Bible
But of that day and hour no one knoweth, not the angels of heaven, but the Father alone.

Darby Bible Translation
But of that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of the heavens, but [my] Father alone.

English Revised Version
But of that day and hour knoweth no one, not even the angels of heaven, neither the Son, but the Father only.

Webster's Bible Translation
But of that day and hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

Weymouth New Testament
"But as to that day and the exact time no one knows--not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father alone.

World English Bible
But no one knows of that day and hour, not even the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

Young's Literal Translation
'And concerning that day and the hour no one hath known -- not even the messengers of the heavens -- except my Father only;
Study Bible
Readiness at Any Hour
35Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will never pass away. 36No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father. 37As it was in the days of Noah, so will it be at the coming of the Son of Man.…
Cross References
Mark 13:32
But as for that day or hour, no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.

Acts 1:7
Jesus replied, "It is not for you to know times or seasons that the Father has fixed by His own authority.

Treasury of Scripture

But of that day and hour knows no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

Matthew 24:42,44
Watch therefore: for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come…

Matthew 25:13
Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour wherein the Son of man cometh.

Zechariah 14:7
But it shall be one day which shall be known to the LORD, not day, nor night: but it shall come to pass, that at evening time it shall be light.







Lexicon
No one
οὐδεὶς (oudeis)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3762: No one, none, nothing.

knows
οἶδεν (oiden)
Verb - Perfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1492: To know, remember, appreciate.

about
Περὶ (Peri)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 4012: From the base of peran; properly, through, i.e. Around; figuratively with respect to; used in various applications, of place, cause or time.

that
ἐκείνης (ekeinēs)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1565: That, that one there, yonder. From ekei; that one (neuter) thing); often intensified by the article prefixed.

day
ἡμέρας (hēmeras)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2250: A day, the period from sunrise to sunset.

[or]
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

hour,
ὥρας (hōras)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 5610: Apparently a primary word; an 'hour'.

not even
οὐδὲ (oude)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3761: Neither, nor, not even, and not. From ou and de; not however, i.e. Neither, nor, not even.

the
οἱ (hoi)
Article - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

angels
ἄγγελοι (angeloi)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 32: From aggello; a messenger; especially an 'angel'; by implication, a pastor.

in heaven,
οὐρανῶν (ouranōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3772: Perhaps from the same as oros; the sky; by extension, heaven; by implication, happiness, power, eternity; specially, the Gospel.

nor
οὐδὲ (oude)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 3761: Neither, nor, not even, and not. From ou and de; not however, i.e. Neither, nor, not even.

the
(ho)
Article - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Son,
Υἱός (Huios)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 5207: A son, descendent. Apparently a primary word; a 'son', used very widely of immediate, remote or figuratively, kinship.

but
εἰ (ei)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1487: If. A primary particle of conditionality; if, whether, that, etc.

only
μόνος (monos)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3441: Only, solitary, desolate. Probably from meno; remaining, i.e. Sole or single; by implication, mere.

the
(ho)
Article - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Father.
Πατὴρ (Patēr)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3962: Father, (Heavenly) Father, ancestor, elder, senior. Apparently a primary word; a 'father'.
(36) No, not the angels of heaven.--St. Mark's addition (Mark 13:32), "neither the Son"--or better, not even the Son--is every way remarkable. Assuming, what is well-nigh certain (see Introduction to St. Mark), the close connection of that Gospel with St. Peter, it is as if the Apostle who heard the discourse desired, for some special reason, to place on record the ipsissima verba of his Master. And that reason may be found in his own teaching. The over-eager expectations of some, and the inevitable reaction of doubt and scorn in others, both rested on their assumption that the Son of Man had definitely fixed the time of His appearing, and on their consequent forgetfulness of the "long-suffering" which might extend a day into a thousand years (2Peter 3:3-8). It is obviously doing violence to the plain meaning of the words to dilute them into the statement that the Son of Man did, not communicate the knowledge which He possessed as the Son of God. If we are perplexed at the mystery of this confession in One in whom we recosniise the presence of "the fulness of the Godhead bodily" (Colossians 1:19; Colossians 2:9), we may find that which may help us at least to wait patiently for the full understanding of the mystery in St. Paul's teaching, that the eternal Word in becoming flesh, "emptied Himself" (see Note on Philippians 2:7) of the infinity which belongs to the divine attributes, and took upon Him the limitations necessarily incidental to man's nature, even when untainted by evil and in fullest fellowship, through the Eternal Spirit, with the Father.

Verse 36. - The apostles had asked (ver. 3), "When shall these things be?" Christ does not now expressly answer this question; he puts forth strongly the uncertainty in the knowledge of these great events, and how this ignorance is disciplinary. Of that day (de die illa, Vulgate) and hour, viz. when Christ shall appear in judgment, The expression plainly, implies that a definite day and moment are fixed for this great appearing, but known only to God. Knoweth no man, no, not (οὐδὲ, not even) the angels of heaven. A kind of climax. Man is naturally excluded from the knowledge; but even to the angels it has not been revealed. A further climax is added in St. Mark, and from that Gospel has been introduced by some very good manuscripts into this place, neither the Son (the Revised Version admits the clause). The words have given occasion to some erroneous statements. It is said by Arians and semi-Arians, and modern disputants who have followed in their steps, that the Son cannot be equal to the Father, if he knows not what the Father knows. Alford says boldly, "This matter was hidden from him." But when we consider such passages as "I and my Father are one;" "I am in the Father, and the Father in me" (John 10:30; John 14:11, etc.), we cannot believe that the time of the great consummation was unknown to him. What is meant, then, by this assertion? How is it true? Doubtless it is to be explained (if capable of explanation) by the hypostatic union of two natures in the Person of Christ, whereby the properties of the two natures are interchangeably predicated. From danger of error on this mysterious subject we are preserved by the precise terms of the Athanasian Creed, according to which we affirm that Christ is "equal to the Father, as touching his Godhead; and inferior to the Father, as touching his manhood ... one altogether; not by confusion of substance, but by unity of Person," etc. If, then, Christ asserts that he is ignorant of anything, it must be that in his human nature he hath, willed not to know that which in his Divine nature he was cognizant cf. This is a part of that voluntary self-surrender and self-limitation of which the apostle speaks when he says that Christ "emptied himself" (Philippians 2:7). He condescended to assume all the conditions of humanity, even willing to share the imperfection of our knowledge in some particulars. How the two natures thus interworked we know not, and need not conjecture; nor can we always divine why prominence at one time is given to the Divine, at another to the human. It is enough for us to know that, for reasons which seemed good unto him, he imposed restriction on his omniscience in this matter, and, to enhance the mysteriousness and awfulness of the great day, announced to his disciples his ignorance of the precise moment of its occurrence. This is a safer exposition than to say, with some, that Christ knew not the day so as to reveal it to us, that it was no part of his mission from the Father to divulge it to men, and therefore that he could truly say he knew it not. This seems rather an evasion than an explanation of the difficulty. But my Father only. The best manuscripts have "the Father." "But" is εἰ μὴ, except. So Christ said to his inquiring apostles, "It is not for you to know the times or seasons, which the Father hath put in his own power" (Acts 1:7). These words do not exclude the Son's participation in the knowledge, though he willed that it should not extend to his human nature. With this and such-like texts in view, how futile, presumptuous, and indeed profane, it is to attempt to settle the exact date and hour when the present age shall end!" 24:29-41 Christ foretells his second coming. It is usual for prophets to speak of things as near and just at hand, to express the greatness and certainty of them. Concerning Christ's second coming, it is foretold that there shall be a great change, in order to the making all things new. Then they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds. At his first coming, he was set for a sign that should be spoken against, but at his second coming, a sign that should be admired. Sooner or later, all sinners will be mourners; but repenting sinners look to Christ, and mourn after a godly sort; and those who sow in those tears shall shortly reap in joy. Impenitent sinners shall see Him whom they have pierced, and, though they laugh now, shall mourn and weep in endless horror and despair. The elect of God are scattered abroad; there are some in all places, and all nations; but when that great gathering day comes, there shall not one of them be missing. Distance of place shall keep none out of heaven. Our Lord declares that the Jews should never cease to be a distinct people, until all things he had been predicting were fulfilled. His prophecy reaches to the day of final judgment; therefore he here, ver. 34, foretells that Judah shall never cease to exist as a distinct people, so long as this world shall endure. Men of the world scheme and plan for generation upon generation here, but they plan not with reference to the overwhelming, approaching, and most certain event of Christ's second coming, which shall do away every human scheme, and set aside for ever all that God forbids. That will be as surprising a day, as the deluge to the old world. Apply this, first, to temporal judgments, particularly that which was then hastening upon the nation and people of the Jews. Secondly, to the eternal judgment. Christ here shows the state of the old world when the deluge came. They were secure and careless; they knew not, until the flood came; and they believed not. Did we know aright that all earthly things must shortly pass away, we should not set our eyes and hearts so much upon them as we do. The evil day is not the further off for men's putting it far from them. What words can more strongly describe the suddenness of our Saviour's coming! Men will be at their respective businesses, and suddenly the Lord of glory will appear. Women will be in their house employments, but in that moment every other work will be laid aside, and every heart will turn inward and say, It is the Lord! Am I prepared to meet him? Can I stand before him? And what, in fact, is the day of judgment to the whole world, but the day of death to every one?
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