Luke 16:6
New International Version
"'Nine hundred gallons of olive oil,' he replied. "The manager told him, 'Take your bill, sit down quickly, and make it four hundred and fifty.'

New Living Translation
The man replied, 'I owe him 800 gallons of olive oil.' So the manager told him, 'Take the bill and quickly change it to 400 gallons.'

English Standard Version
He said, ‘A hundred measures of oil.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.’

Berean Study Bible
‘A hundred measures of olive oil,’ he answered. ‘Take your bill,’ said the manager. ‘Sit down quickly, and write fifty.’

Berean Literal Bible
And he said, 'A hundred baths of oil.' And he said to him, 'Take your bill, and having sat down quickly, write fifty.'

New American Standard Bible
"And he said, 'A hundred measures of oil.' And he said to him, 'Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.'

King James Bible
And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

Christian Standard Bible
"'A hundred measures of olive oil,' he said. "'Take your invoice,' he told him, 'sit down quickly, and write fifty.'

Contemporary English Version
"A hundred barrels of olive oil," the man answered. So the manager said, "Take your bill and sit down and quickly write '50.'"

Good News Translation
'One hundred barrels of olive oil,' he answered. 'Here is your account,' the manager told him; 'sit down and write fifty.'

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"A hundred measures of olive oil,' he said. "'Take your invoice,' he told him, sit down quickly, and write 50.'

International Standard Version
The man replied, 'A hundred jars of olive oil.' The manager told him, 'Get your bill. Sit down quickly and write "50."'

NET Bible
The man replied, 'A hundred measures of olive oil.' The manager said to him, 'Take your bill, sit down quickly, and write fifty.'

New Heart English Bible
He said, 'A hundred batos of oil.' He said to him, 'Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.'

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
“And he said to him, 'A hundred baths of oil', and he said to him, 'Take your book, sit quickly and write fifty baths.' “

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"The debtor replied, 'Eight hundred gallons of olive oil.' "The manager told him, 'Take my master's ledger. Quick! Sit down, and write "four hundred!"'

New American Standard 1977
“And he said, ‘A hundred measures of oil.’ And he said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.’

Jubilee Bible 2000
And he said, A hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bill and sit down quickly and write fifty.

King James 2000 Bible
And he said, A hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take your bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

American King James Version
And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said to him, Take your bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

American Standard Version
And he said, A hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bond, and sit down quickly and write fifty.

Douay-Rheims Bible
But he said: An hundred barrels of oil. And he said to him: Take thy bill and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

Darby Bible Translation
And he said, A hundred baths of oil. And he said to him, Take thy writing and sit down quickly and write fifty.

English Revised Version
And he said, A hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bond, and sit down quickly and write fifty.

Webster's Bible Translation
And he said, A hundred measures of oil. And he said to him, Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

Weymouth New Testament
"'A hundred firkins of oil,' he replied. "'Here is your account,' said the steward: 'sit down quickly and change it into fifty firkins.'

World English Bible
He said, 'A hundred batos of oil.' He said to him, 'Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.'

Young's Literal Translation
and he said, A hundred baths of oil; and he said to him, Take thy bill, and having sat down write fifty.
Study Bible
The Parable of the Shrewd Manager
5And he called in each one of his master’s debtors. ‘How much do you owe my master?’ he asked the first. 6‘A hundred measures of olive oil,’ he answered. ‘Take your bill,’ said the manager. ‘Sit down quickly, and write fifty.’ 7Then he asked another, ‘And how much do you owe?’ ‘A hundred measures of wheat,’ he replied. ‘Take your bill and write eighty,’ he told him.…
Cross References
Matthew 20:8
When evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his foreman, 'Call the workers and pay them their wages, starting with the last ones hired and moving on to the first.'

Luke 16:5
And he called in each one of his master's debtors. 'How much do you owe my master?' he asked the first.

Luke 16:7
Then he asked another, 'And how much do you owe?' 'A hundred measures of wheat,' he replied. 'Take your bill and write eighty,' he told him.

John 2:6
Now six stone water jars had been set there for the Jewish rites of purification. Each could hold from twenty to thirty gallons.

Treasury of Scripture

And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said to him, Take your bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

measures.

#NAME?#NAME?

Take.

Luke 16:9,12
And I say unto you, Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness; that, when ye fail, they may receive you into everlasting habitations…

Titus 2:10
Not purloining, but shewing all good fidelity; that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things.







Lexicon
‘A hundred
Ἑκατὸν (Hekaton)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1540: One hundred. Of uncertain affinity; a hundred.

[measures]
βάτους (batous)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 943: Of Hebrew origin; a bath, or measure for liquids.

of olive oil,’
ἐλαίου (elaiou)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 1637: Olive oil, oil. Neuter of the same as elaia; olive oil.

he answered.
εἶπεν (eipen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2036: Answer, bid, bring word, command. A primary verb; to speak or say.

‘Take
Δέξαι (Dexai)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Middle - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1209: To take, receive, accept, welcome. Middle voice of a primary verb; to receive.

your
σου (sou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

bill,’
γράμματα (grammata)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 1121: From grapho; a writing, i.e. A letter, note, epistle, book, etc. plural learning.

said [the manager].
εἶπεν (eipen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2036: Answer, bid, bring word, command. A primary verb; to speak or say.

‘Sit down
καθίσας (kathisas)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2523: Another form for kathezomai; to seat down, i.e. Set; intransitively, to sit; figuratively, to settle.

quickly,
ταχέως (tacheōs)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 5030: Soon, quickly, hastily. Adverb from tachus; briefly, i.e. speedily, or rapidly.

[and] write
γράψον (grapson)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1125: A primary verb; to 'grave', especially to write; figuratively, to describe.

fifty.’
πεντήκοντα (pentēkonta)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 4004: Fifty. Multiplicative of pente; fifty.
(6) Take thy bill, and sit down quickly.--The better MSS. give, thy bills, or thy documents, in the plural. These would include that which answered to the modern lease, the contract which specified the rent, and probably also the memorandum of the due delivery of the annual share of the produce. In this case the measure is the Hebrew bath, which has been variously estimated, the data being uncertain and conflicting, at from one to three gallons to the higher number stated in the marginal note. The steward by thus tempting the debtors with an immediate gain, and making them sharers in his frauds, took the readiest and most direct means of securing at once their favour and their silence. That which answered to this in the first application of the parable was the conduct of the Pharisees, just in proportion as they lost the moral force which they had once exercised, in accommodating their casuistry to the selfishness of their followers. Thus by their Corban teaching (see Note on Matthew 15:5) they released men from the obligation of supporting parents, and made perjury easy by their artificial distinctions as to oaths (Matthew 5:33; Matthew 23:16-22), gave a wide license to lust by their doctrine of divorce (Matthew 5:31; Matthew 19:3), and substituted the paying tithes of mint, and anise, and cummin for the weightier matters of the Law (Matthew 23:23). Like phenomena have been seen in analogous circumstances in the history of the Christian Church. When Leo X. sent forth his preachers of indulgences with their short and easy methods of salvation; when Jesuit confessors were to be found in every court of Europe, doing nothing to preserve their votaries from a fathomless licentiousness; when Protestant theologians tuned their voice according to the time, and pandered to the passions of a Henry VIII. or a Landgrave of Hesse; when the preachers of justification by faith turned the grace of God into lasciviousness, or made it compatible with a life of money-making worldliness; when men lower the standard of duty to gain support and popularity--there the act of the steward in bidding the debtor write fifty measures, when he owed a hundred, finds its counterpart.

16:1-12 Whatever we have, the property of it is God's; we have only the use of it, according to the direction of our great Lord, and for his honour. This steward wasted his lord's goods. And we are all liable to the same charge; we have not made due improvement of what God has trusted us with. The steward cannot deny it; he must make up his accounts, and be gone. This may teach us that death will come, and deprive us of the opportunities we now have. The steward will make friends of his lord's debtors or tenants, by striking off a considerable part of their debt to his lord. The lord referred to in this parable commended not the fraud, but the policy of the steward. In that respect alone is it so noticed. Worldly men, in the choice of their object, are foolish; but in their activity, and perseverance, they are often wiser than believers. The unjust steward is not set before us as an example in cheating his master, or to justify any dishonesty, but to point out the careful ways of worldly men. It would be well if the children of light would learn wisdom from the men of the world, and would as earnestly pursue their better object. The true riches signify spiritual blessings; and if a man spends upon himself, or hoards up what God has trusted to him, as to outward things, what evidence can he have, that he is an heir of God through Christ? The riches of this world are deceitful and uncertain. Let us be convinced that those are truly rich, and very rich, who are rich in faith, and rich toward God, rich in Christ, in the promises; let us then lay up our treasure in heaven, and expect our portion from thence.
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Alphabetical: A and bill down Eight fifty' four gallons he him hundred hundred' it make manager measures of oil olive quickly replied said sit Take The to told write your

NT Gospels: Luke 16:6 He said 'A hundred batos of oil (Luke Lu Lk) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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