Daniel 2:12
New International Version
This made the king so angry and furious that he ordered the execution of all the wise men of Babylon.

New Living Translation
The king was furious when he heard this, and he ordered that all the wise men of Babylon be executed.

English Standard Version
Because of this the king was angry and very furious, and commanded that all the wise men of Babylon be destroyed.

Berean Study Bible
This response made the king so angry and furious that he gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

New American Standard Bible
Because of this the king became indignant and very furious and gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

King James Bible
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Christian Standard Bible
Because of this, the king became violently angry and gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Good News Translation
At that, the king flew into a rage and ordered the execution of all the royal advisers in Babylon.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Because of this, the king became violently angry and gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

International Standard Version
At this point, the king flew into a rage and issued an order to destroy all the advisors of Babylon.

NET Bible
Because of this the king got furiously angry and gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

New Heart English Bible
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
This made the king so angry and furious that he gave an order to destroy all the wise advisers in Babylon.

JPS Tanakh 1917
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

New American Standard 1977
Because of this the king became indignant and very furious, and gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Jubilee Bible 2000
For this cause the king was angry and very furious and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

King James 2000 Bible
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

American King James Version
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

American Standard Version
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
Then the king in rage and anger commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Upon hearing this, the king in fury, and in great wrath, commanded that all the wise men of Babylon should be put to death.

Darby Bible Translation
For this cause the king was irritated and very wroth, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

English Revised Version
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Webster's Bible Translation
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

World English Bible
For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Young's Literal Translation
Therefore the king hath been angry and very wroth, and hath said to destroy all the wise men of Babylon;
Study Bible
Nebuchadnezzar's Dream
11What the king requests is so difficult that no one can tell it to him except the gods, whose dwelling is not with mortals.” 12This response made the king so angry and furious that he gave orders to destroy all the wise men of Babylon. 13So the decree went out that the wise men were to be executed, and men went to look for Daniel and his friends to execute them.…
Cross References
Psalm 76:10
Even the wrath of man shall praise You; with the survivors of wrath You will clothe Yourself.

Daniel 2:5
The king replied to the astrologers, "My word is final: If you do not tell me the dream and its interpretation, you will be cut into pieces and your houses will be reduced to rubble.

Daniel 2:24
Therefore Daniel went to Arioch, whom the king had appointed to destroy the wise men of Babylon, and said to him, "Do not execute the wise men of Babylon! Bring me before the king, and I will give him the interpretation."

Daniel 3:13
Then Nebuchadnezzar, furious with rage, summoned Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. So these men were brought before the king,

Daniel 3:19
At this, Nebuchadnezzar was filled with rage, and the expression on his face changed toward Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. He gave orders to heat the furnace seven times hotter than usual,

Daniel 5:19
Because of the greatness that He bestowed on him, all peoples, nations, and men of every language trembled in fear before him. He killed whom he wished and kept alive whom he wished; he exalted whom he wished and humbled whom he wished.

Treasury of Scripture

For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon.

Daniel 3:13
Then Nebuchadnezzar in his rage and fury commanded to bring Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Then they brought these men before the king.

Job 5:2
For wrath killeth the foolish man, and envy slayeth the silly one.

Psalm 76:10
Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee: the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain.







Lexicon
This [response] made
קֳבֵ֣ל (qo·ḇêl)
Preposition
Strong's Hebrew 6903: In front of, before, because of, because that

the king
מַלְכָּ֕א (mal·kā)
Noun - masculine singular determinate
Strong's Hebrew 4430: A king

so
שַׂגִּ֑יא (śag·gî)
Adjective - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7690: Great, much

angry
בְּנַ֖ס (bə·nas)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1149: To be enraged

and furious
וּקְצַ֣ף (ū·qə·ṣap̄)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Conjunctive perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7108: To become enraged

that he gave orders
וַאֲמַר֙ (wa·’ă·mar)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Conjunctive perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 560: To say, tell, command

to destroy
לְה֣וֹבָדָ֔ה (lə·hō·w·ḇā·ḏāh)
Preposition-l | Verb - Hifil - Infinitive construct
Strong's Hebrew 7: To wander away, lose oneself, to perish

all
כָּל־ (kāl-)
Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's Hebrew 3606: The whole, all, any, every

the wise men
חַכִּימֵ֥י (ḥak·kî·mê)
Noun - masculine plural construct
Strong's Hebrew 2445: Wise, a Magian

of Babylon.
בָבֶֽל׃ (ḇā·ḇel)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew 895: Babylon -- an eastern Mediterranean empire and its capital city
(12) This order to massacre the wise men extended apparently only to those who were resident in the city of Babylon, where they had a fixed habitation. Though Daniel had been already trained in their schools, he had not as yet been appointed "a wise man." However, being a student, his death was implied in the general order, which, as appears from Daniel 2:13, had already begun to be executed.

Verse 12. - For this cause the king was angry and very furious, and commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon. The Septuagint rendering differs little in sense from the above, but in words it does considerably, "Then the king, becoming gloomy and very grieved, commanded that they lead out all the wise men of Babylonia." The main thing to be observed is the softening of the meaning in the hands of the Septuagint translator. This is so great as to suggest that he read לָהוזָלה instead of לְהובָדָה. The aphel of אזל is not used in Chaldee, but is used in Syriac. Theodotion's rendering is, "Then the king in anger and wrath commanded to destroy all the wise meal of Babylon." The Syriac has a shade of difference, "Then was the king vehemently enraged, and in great fury commanded to destroy all the wise men of Babylon." It is evident that Theodotion read בְנַס (benas), "was angry," as if it were the preposition ב and the Syriac noun נַס (has), "anger." He also must have inserted the preposition before קְצַפ (qetzaph), "wrath;" in this he is followed by the Peshitta. The Septuagint is freer in its rendering in this verse, and one cannot argue anything from it. The probability seems to be that נַס; (nas) is used as a noun, and that the Targamic verb was formed from the mistake of a scribe dropping the preposition before קְצַפ (qetzaph). If we are correct in this, we have an additional evidence that the original languagge of Daniel was not Chaldee, but Syriac, or, at all events, Eastern Aramaic. As a grammatical note, we direct attention to the form לְהובָדָה, where the א of the root has totally disappeared before the ה of the haphel, the equivalent in Biblical Aramaic of the Chaldee and Syriac aphel with its preformative א . Professor Bevan says that this distinction is only a matter of orthography. Are we to deduce that Professor Bevan has a cockney disregard for hs? The writer now drops reference to special classes of wise men, and names them generally hakeemin. The king is unconvinced of the truth of these wise men (hakeemin), or rather he is convinced that they are traitors and deceivers. They are either concealing from him the knowledge they have, and are, therefore, traitors to him; or the gods have withdrawn from them, and therefore they must have been untrue to the gods. On both these grounds Nebuchadnezzar thinks them worthy of death. He at once issues the decree that all the wise men in the city of Babylon should be slain. If the LXX. reading of Daniel 2:2 be correct, he had only summoned the Chaldean wise men. If all the wise men of Babylon were ordered to be slain, the punishment is extended beyond the offence. Possibly he argued, "If even my fellow-countrymen, the Chaldeans, are traitors, much more will the Babylonians be so." So far as words go, it is doubtful whether this decree applies to the province of Babylonia, as the Septuagint translator thinks, or merely to those in the city. But cruel and furious as was the young conqueror, he was scarcely likely to order the wholesale massacre of those who, in Sippara and Borsippa, had neither refused to do what he wished, nor by implication called him an unreasonable tyrant, as had the wise men in Babylon. 2:1-13 The greatest men are most open to cares and troubles of mind, which disturb their repose in the night, while the sleep of the labouring man is sweet and sound. We know not the uneasiness of many who live in great pomp, and, as others vainly think, in pleasure also. The king said that his learned men must tell him the dream itself, or they should all be put to death as deceivers. Men are more eager to ask as to future events, than to learn the way of salvation or the path of duty; yet foreknowledge of future events increases anxiety and trouble. Those who deceived, by pretending to do what they could not do, were sentenced to death, for not being able to do what they did not pretend to.
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Alphabetical: all and angry Babylon became Because destroy execution furious gave he indignant king made men of ordered orders so that the This to very wise

OT Prophets: Daniel 2:12 For this cause the king was angry (Dan. Da Dn) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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