Romans 7:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Do you not know, brothers and sisters--for I am speaking to those who know the law--that the law has authority over someone only as long as that person lives?

New Living Translation
Now, dear brothers and sisters--you who are familiar with the law--don't you know that the law applies only while a person is living?

English Standard Version
Or do you not know, brothers—for I am speaking to those who know the law—that the law is binding on a person only as long as he lives?

Berean Study Bible
Do you not know, brothers (for I am speaking to those who know the law), that the law has authority over a man only as long as he lives?

Berean Literal Bible
Or are you ignorant brothers (for I speak to those knowing the law), that the law rules over the man for as long as the time he is alive?

New American Standard Bible
Or do you not know, brethren (for I am speaking to those who know the law), that the law has jurisdiction over a person as long as he lives?

King James Bible
Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Since I am speaking to those who understand law, brothers, are you unaware that the law has authority over someone as long as he lives?

International Standard Version
Don't you realize, brothers—for I am speaking to people who know the Law—that the Law can press its claims over a person only as long as he is alive?

NET Bible
Or do you not know, brothers and sisters (for I am speaking to those who know the law), that the law is lord over a person as long as he lives?

New Heart English Bible
Or do you not know, brothers (for I speak to men who know the law), that the law has dominion over a man for as long as he lives?

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Or do you not know, my brethren, for I speak to those who know The Written Law, that The Written Law has authority over a man as long as he lives,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Don't you realize, brothers and sisters, that laws have power over people only as long as they are alive? (I'm speaking to people who are familiar with Moses' Teachings.)

New American Standard 1977
Or do you not know, brethren (for I am speaking to those who know the law), that the law has jurisdiction over a person as long as he lives?

Jubilee Bible 2000
Know ye not, brethren (for I speak to those that know the law), that the law has dominion over a man only as long as he lives?

King James 2000 Bible
Know you not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law has dominion over a man as long as he lives?

American King James Version
Know you not, brothers, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law has dominion over a man as long as he lives?

American Standard Version
Or are ye ignorant, brethren (for I speak to men who know the law), that the law hath dominion over a man for so long time as he liveth?

Douay-Rheims Bible
KNOW you not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) that the law hath dominion over a man, as long as it liveth?

Darby Bible Translation
Are ye ignorant, brethren, (for I speak to those knowing law,) that law rules over a man as long as he lives?

English Revised Version
Or are ye ignorant, brethren (for I speak to men that know the law), how that the law hath dominion over a man for so long time as he liveth?

Webster's Bible Translation
Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law) that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth?

Weymouth New Testament
Brethren, do you not know--for I am writing to people acquainted with the Law--that it is during our lifetime that we are subject to the Law?

World English Bible
Or don't you know, brothers (for I speak to men who know the law), that the law has dominion over a man for as long as he lives?

Young's Literal Translation
Are ye ignorant, brethren -- for to those knowing law I speak -- that the law hath lordship over the man as long as he liveth?
Study Bible
Release from the Law
1Do you not know, brothers (for I am speaking to those who know the law), that the law has authority over a man only as long as he lives? 2For instance, a married woman is bound by law to her husband as long as he lives. But if her husband dies, she is released from the law of marriage.…
Cross References
Romans 1:13
I do not want you to be unaware, brothers, how often I planned to come to you (but have been prevented from visiting until now), in order that I might have a harvest among you, just as I have had among the other Gentiles.

Romans 10:4
Christ is the end of the Law, in order to bring righteousness to everyone who believes.
Treasury of Scripture

Know you not, brothers, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law has dominion over a man as long as he lives?

Know. See on

Romans 6:3 Know you not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ …

brethren.

Romans 9:3 For I could wish that myself were accursed from Christ for my brothers, …

Romans 10:1 Brothers, my heart's desire and prayer to God for Israel is, that …

them that.

Romans 2:17,18 Behold, you are called a Jew, and rest in the law, and make your boast of God…

Ezra 7:25 And you, Ezra, after the wisdom of your God, that is in your hand, …

Proverbs 6:23 For the commandment is a lamp; and the law is light; and reproofs …

1 Corinthians 9:8 Say I these things as a man? or said not the law the same also?

Galatians 4:21 Tell me, you that desire to be under the law, do you not hear the law?

the law.

Romans 7:6 But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we …

Romans 6:14 For sin shall not have dominion over you: for you are not under the …

a man. Or, person, either man or woman; [anthropos] and homo having this extent of signification.

VII.

(1-6) The Apostle takes up an idea to which he had alluded in Romans 7:14-15 of the preceding chapter, "Ye are not under the Law, but under grace;" and as he had worked out the conclusion of the death of the Christian to sin, so now he works out that of his death to the Law. This he does by an illustration borrowed from the marriage-bond. That bond is dissolved by the death of one of the parties to it. And in like manner the death of the Christian with Christ releases him from his obligation to the Law, and opens out to him a new and spiritual service in place of his old subjection to a written code.

(1) Know ye not.--Here again insert "or": Or know ye not, &c., carrying on the thought from the end of the last chapter. Is not, argues the Apostle, what I say true? Or do I hear the old objection raised again, that the system under which the Christian is living is not one of grace in which eternal life is given freely by God, but the Mosaic law? That would show an ignorance--which in you I cannot believe--of the fact that the dominion of the Law ceases with death, of which fact it is easy to take a simple illustration.

To them that know the law.--The Roman Church, as we have seen, was composed in about equal proportions of Jewish and of Gentile Christians. The Jews would naturally know the provisions of their own law, while the Gentile Christians would know them sufficiently to be aware of the fact, from their intercourse with Jewish members of their own community, and from hearing the Old Testament read in the synagogues, where their public worship was still conducted. The practice of reading from the Old Testament did not cease on the transition from Jewish to Christian modes of worship; it survives still in the "First Lesson."

Verses 1-6. - Here comes in the third illustration of the moral obligation of the baptized. It rests on the recognized principle that death cancels the claims of human law on a person (cf. Romans 6:7); and this with especial reference to the law of marriage, as being peculiarly applicable to the subject to be illustrated, since the Church is elsewhere regarded as married to Christ. As has been observed above, it is from the Law that Christians are now said to be emancipated in the death of Christ; not from sin, as in the previous sections. Hence this section might at first sight seem to introduce a new line of thought. But it is really a continuation of the same, though differently viewed; for, in the sense intended by St. Paul, being under the Law is equivalent to being under sin. How this is has already more or less appeared; and it will be shown further in the latter part of this chapter. For elucidating the connection of thought between this and the preceding sections, it may be here briefly stated thus: A fundamental axiom with the apostle is that "where no law is, there is no transgression" (Romans 4:15; cf. 5:13; 7:9); i.e. without law of some kind (including in the idea both external law and the law of conscience) to reveal to man the difference between right and wrong, he is not held responsible; to be a sinner before God he must know what sin is. Human sin consists in a man doing wrong, knowing it to be wrong; or, at any rate, with an original power and opportunity of knowing it to be so. (This, be it observed, is the idea running through the whole of ch. 1, in which all mankind are convicted of sin; the whole drift of the argument being that they had sinned against knowledge.) Law, then, in making sin known to man, subjects him to its guilt, and consequently to its condemnation. But this is all it does; it is all that, in itself, it can do. It can remove neither the guilt nor the dominion of sin. Its principle is simply to exact entire obedience to its requirements; and there it leaves the sinner. The above view applies to all law, and of course peculiarly to the Mosaic Law (which the writer has all along mainly in view) in proportion to the authority of its source and the strictness of its requirements. Thus it is that St. Paul regards being under the Law as the same thing as being under sin, and dying to the Law as the same thing as dying to sin. Grace, on the other hand, under which we pass in rising again with Christ, does both the things which law cannot do: it both cancels the guilt of sin (repentance and faith presumed), and also imparts power to overcome it. Verse 1. - Are ye ignorant, brethren (for I speak to persons knowing law), how that the Law hath dominion over a man for so long time as he liveth? i.e. so long as the man liveth; not so long as the Law liveth in the sense of viget, or "remains in force," though Origen, Ambrose, Grotius, Erasmus, and others, for reasons that will appear, understood the latter sense. It is not the natural one. Know ye not, brethren,.... The apostle having asserted, Romans 6:14, that the believing Romans were "not under the law"; which he knew would be displeasing to many, and excepted to by them, especially the Jews that were among them, who though they believed in Christ, yet were zealous of the law, takes it up again, and explains and defends it. That they were the Jewish converts at Rome he here particularly addresses, appears partly from his calling them "brethren", for they were so according to the flesh, as well as in a spiritual relation, and this he rather mentions to soften their resentments, and conciliate their minds to him; and partly from the words included in a parenthesis,

for I speak to them that know the law; not the law of nature, but the law of Moses, as the Jews did, being trained up in the knowledge of it; to these he appeals, saying, "know ye not", for the truth of a principle or maxim he afterwards improves, which they could not be ignorant of,

how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he, or "it",

liveth; for the word "liveth" may refer either to man or to the law. The law may be said to live, when it is in full force, and to be dead, when it is abrogated and disannulled; now whilst it lives, or is in force, it has dominion over a man; it can require and command obedience of him, and in case of disobedience can condemn him, and inflict punishment on him: and this power it has also as long as the man lives who is under it, but when he is dead it has no more dominion over him; then "the servant is free from his master", Job 3:19; that is, from the law of his master; and children are free from the law of their parents, the wife from the law of her husband, and subjects from the law of their prince. This is so clear a point that none can doubt of it. The Jews have a saying (d), that

"when a man is dead, he becomes , free from the law, and from the commands.''

(d) T. Bab. Sabbat, fol. 30. 1. Niddah, fol. 61. 2. & T. Hieros. Kilaim, fol. 32. 1.CHAPTER 7

Ro 7:1-25. Same Subject Continued.

Relation of Believers to the Law and to Christ (Ro 7:1-6).

Recurring to the statement of Ro 6:14, that believers are "not under the law but under grace," the apostle here shows how this change is brought about, and what holy consequences follow from it.

1. I speak to them that know the law—of Moses to whom, though not themselves Jews (see on [2209]Ro 1:13), the Old Testament was familiar.7:1-6 So long as a man continues under the law as a covenant, and seeks justification by his own obedience, he continues the slave of sin in some form. Nothing but the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus, can make any sinner free from the law of sin and death. Believers are delivered from that power of the law, which condemns for the sins committed by them. And they are delivered from that power of the law which stirs up and provokes the sin that dwells in them. Understand this not of the law as a rule, but as a covenant of works. In profession and privilege, we are under a covenant of grace, and not under a covenant of works; under the gospel of Christ, not under the law of Moses. The difference is spoken of under the similitude or figure of being married to a new husband. The second marriage is to Christ. By death we are freed from obligation to the law as a covenant, as the wife is from her vows to her husband. In our believing powerfully and effectually, we are dead to the law, and have no more to do with it than the dead servant, who is freed from his master, has to do with his master's yoke. The day of our believing, is the day of being united to the Lord Jesus. We enter upon a life of dependence on him, and duty to him. Good works are from union with Christ; as the fruitfulness of the vine is the product of its being united to its roots; there is no fruit to God, till we are united to Christ. The law, and the greatest efforts of one under the law, still in the flesh, under the power of corrupt principles, cannot set the heart right with regard to the love of God, overcome worldly lusts, or give truth and sincerity in the inward parts, or any thing that comes by the special sanctifying influences of the Holy Spirit. Nothing more than a formal obedience to the outward letter of any precept, can be performed by us, without the renewing, new-creating grace of the new covenant.
Jump to Previous
Acquainted Binding Clear Dominion Jurisdiction Law Power Rules Speak Speaking Subject Time Using Writing
Jump to Next
Acquainted Binding Clear Dominion Jurisdiction Law Power Rules Speak Speaking Subject Time Using Writing
Links
Romans 7:1 NIV
Romans 7:1 NLT
Romans 7:1 ESV
Romans 7:1 NASB
Romans 7:1 KJV

Romans 7:1 Biblia Paralela
Romans 7:1 Chinese Bible
Romans 7:1 French Bible
Romans 7:1 German Bible

Alphabetical: for a am as authority brethren brothers Do for has he I jurisdiction know law law lives long man men not only Or over person speaking that the those to who you

NT Letters: Romans 7:1 Or don't you know brothers for (Rom. Ro) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Romans 6:23
Top of Page
Top of Page