Luke 10:38
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him.

New Living Translation
As Jesus and the disciples continued on their way to Jerusalem, they came to a certain village where a woman named Martha welcomed him into her home.

English Standard Version
Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a village. And a woman named Martha welcomed him into her house.

Berean Study Bible
As they traveled along, Jesus entered a village where a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home.

Berean Literal Bible
Now in their proceeding, He entered into a certain village; and a certain woman named Martha received Him into the home.

New American Standard Bible
Now as they were traveling along, He entered a village; and a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home.

King James Bible
Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
While they were traveling, He entered a village, and a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home.

International Standard Version
Now as they were traveling along, Jesus went into a village. A woman named Martha welcomed him into her home.

NET Bible
Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a certain village where a woman named Martha welcomed him as a guest.

New Heart English Bible
It happened as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village, and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And it was that when they were traveling on a road, he entered a certain village and a woman whose name was Martha received him into her house.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
As they were traveling along, Jesus went into a village. A woman named Martha welcomed him into her home.

New American Standard 1977
Now as they were traveling along, He entered a certain village; and a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village; and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

King James 2000 Bible
Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

American King James Version
Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

American Standard Version
Now as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Now it came to pass as they went, that he entered into a certain town: and a certain woman named Martha, received him into her house.

Darby Bible Translation
And it came to pass as they went that he entered into a certain village; and a certain woman, Martha by name, received him into her house.

English Revised Version
Now as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Webster's Bible Translation
Now it came to pass, as they were going, he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman, named Martha, received him into her house.

Weymouth New Testament
As they pursued their journey He came to a certain village, where a woman named Martha welcomed Him to her house.

World English Bible
It happened as they went on their way, he entered into a certain village, and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

Young's Literal Translation
And it came to pass, in their going on, that he entered into a certain village, and a certain woman, by name Martha, did receive him into her house,
Study Bible
Martha and Mary
37“The one who showed him mercy,” replied the expert in the law. Then Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.” 38As they traveled along, Jesus entered a village where a woman named Martha welcomed Him into her home. 39She had a sister named Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet, listening to His message.…
Cross References
Luke 10:37
"The one who showed him mercy," replied the expert in the law. Then Jesus told him, "Go and do likewise."

Luke 10:40
But Martha was distracted by all the preparations to be made. She came to Jesus and said, "Lord, do You not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her to help me!"

Luke 10:41
"Martha, Martha," the Lord replied, "you are worried and upset about many things.

John 11:1
At this time a man named Lazarus was sick. He lived in Bethany, the village of Mary and her sister Martha.

John 11:5
Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.

John 11:20
So when Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went out to meet Him; but Mary stayed at home.

John 12:2
So they hosted a dinner for Jesus there. Martha served, and Lazarus was among those reclining at the table with Him.

Acts 17:7
and Jason has welcomed them into his home. They are all defying Caesar's decrees, saying there is another king, named Jesus!"
Treasury of Scripture

Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village: and a certain woman named Martha received him into her house.

a certain.

John 11:1-5 Now a certain man was sick, named Lazarus, of Bethany, the town of …

John 12:1-3 Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus …

received.

Luke 8:2,3 And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, …

Acts 16:15 And when she was baptized, and her household, she sought us, saying, …

2 John 1:10 If there come any to you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him …

(38) He entered into a certain village.--The identity of the two names that follow, and, we may add, of the characters connected with the names, leaves hardly room for doubt that the village thus spoken of was Bethany. (See Note on Matthew 21:1.) St. Luke's reason for not giving the name is probably connected with the singular reticence of the first three Gospels as to the family of Lazarus. St. Matthew (Matthew 26:7) and St. Mark (Mark 14:3) narrate the anointing, which we learn from John 12:3 to have been the act of Mary, but suppress her name. St. Luke gives, in this section, a characteristic anecdote of the two sisters, but suppresses the name of the village in which they lived. None of the first three Gospels name Lazarus, though there seems some reason to believe that the first two narrate a fact in which he took a prominent part (see Note on Matthew 19:16), and that the third gives the name with a special reference to him. (See Note on Luke 16:20.) A probable explanation is that, both on spiritual and perhaps social grounds, reticence as to the family of Bethany was, for a time, generally maintained among the disciples of Jerusalem, and that St. Luke, coming at a later period, and finding his way, as a physician, into the company of devout women, named one fact that seemed of special interest. (See Introduction, and Note on chap Luke 8:1.)

Martha.--The name does not appear in the Old Testament, and is Aramaic rather than Hebrew. It has a point of contact with secular history in having been borne by the Syrian prophetess who accompanied the Roman general, Marius, in his Numidian campaigns. Its meaning, as the feminine of Maran (= Lord), and therefore equivalent to the Greek Kyria, suggests the possible identity of the sister of Lazarus with the elect Kyria (or elect Lady), to whom St. John addressed his second Epistle. (See Note on 2John 1:1.)

Verses 38-42. - The sisters of Bethany. The following points are noticeable. A close intimacy evidently existed between the brother and his two sisters and Jesus. They evidently were prominent friends of the Master, and during the years of the public ministry were on many occasions associated with Jesus of Nazareth, and yet a singular reticence evidently existed on the part of the writers of the first three Gospels in respect of the brother and sisters. His name is never mentioned by them. Here, for instance, Bethany is simply alluded to as "a certain village." There was some reason, no doubt, why the three synoptical evangelists exercised this reticence. We have before explained that these Gospels more or less represent the "texts," so to speak, upon which the first preachers of the religion of Jesus based their sermons and instructions. The long recital of John 11. gives us the clue. For the disciples of Jesus publicly to call attention in their sermons and addresses to Lazarus, on whom the Master's greatest miracle had been worked, would have no doubt called down a ceaseless, restless hostility on the Bethany household; for it must be remembered that for years after the Resurrection the deadly enemies of Jesus and his followers were supreme in Jerusalem and the neighbourhood. There were reasons, no doubt, now unknown to us, which rendered it important to the welfare of the early Church that the Bethany family should remain undisturbed and in comparative privacy. The peculiar and unique position of Lazarus. During those four days what had he seen and heard? Much curiosity, no doubt, existed to question the risen one:what fierce hostility, what morbid useless speculation, might not have been easily aroused? St. John's Gospel was not written for long years after the event. It probably represents no public preaching, rather a private and esoteric teaching. The home of St. John, too, for years prior to putting forth his Gospel, was far distant from Jerusalem. Probably Jerusalem had ceased to exist as a city and the Jews as a nation well-nigh a quarter of a century before St. John's writing was given to the Church. There were no reasons then for any silence. Jerusalem and Bethany were a heap of ruins. Lazarus and his sisters and well-nigh all their friends had probably then been long in the presence of the loved or hated Master. Verse 38. - Now it came to pass, as they went, that he entered into a certain village. The scene here related took place, no doubt, at Bethany, and, most probably, during that short visit to Jerusalem, at the Feast of Dedication, in the month of that December which preceded the Passover "of the Crucifixion." This visit to Jerusalem, as has been suggested above, was made in the course of that solemn progress the account of which fills up the long section of St. Luke's Gospel, beginning at Luke 9:51. The characters of the sisters here mentioned exactly correspond, as do their names, with the well-known Bethany family of that Lazarus for whom the great miracle, related at length by St. John, was worked. There are several mentions of this family in the synoptical Gospels, besides the long and important notice in St. John. A certain woman named Martha. The name is rather Aramaic than pure Hebrew. It is equivalent to the Greek Kyria, and signifies "lady." It has been suggested that the Second Epistle of St. John was addressed to this Martha. It was written, we know, to the elect kyria, or "lady" (2 John 1). Various identifications, more or less probable, have been attempted in the persons of the Bethany family. Martha has been supposed to be identical with the wife of Simon the leper (Matthew 26:6; Mark 14:3). One hypothesis identifies Lazarus with the "young ruler" whom Jesus loved (see Dean Plumptre, in Bishop Ellicott's Commentary); another, with the saintly Rabbi Eliezer (or Lazarus) of the Talmud. These are, however, little more than ingenious, though perhaps not quite baseless, fancies. Now it came to pass as they went,.... As Christ and his disciples went from Jerusalem, having been at the feast of tabernacles, John 7:2 or at the feast of dedication, John 10:22 to some other parts of Judea:

that he entered into a certain village; called Bethany, which was about fifteen furlongs, or two miles from Jerusalem, John 11:1

and a certain woman named Martha. This is a common name with the Jews; hence we read of Samuel bar Martha (y), and of Abba bar Martha (z), and of Isaac bar Martha (a); and of Martha, the daughter of Baithus (b), who is said to be a rich widow; and this Martha here, is thought by Grotins to be a widow also, with whom her brother Lazarus, and sister Mary lived: though sometimes, this name was given to men; so we read of Martha, (c) the uncle of Rab, who had five brethren; and the same writer observes (d), that it is not known whether Martha is, a man or a woman, but this is determined here:

received him into her house; in a very kind and courteous manner, she being mistress of it; and having known Christ before, or at least had heard much of him, and believed in him, as the true Messiah.

(y) T. Bab. Beracot, fol. 13. 2. & 25. 2. & Pesachim, fol. 106. 2. Yoma, fol. 19. 2. Juchuin, fol. 76. 2.((z) T. Bab. Sabbat, fol. 121. 2. Juchasin, fol. 72. 2.((a) T. Bab. Pesachim, fol. 33. 2. Juchasin, fol. 91. 1.((b) Misn. Yebamot, c. 6. sect. 4. T. Bob. Yoma, fol. 18. 1. Succa, fol. 52. 2. Cetubot, fol. 104. 1. Gittin, fol. 56. 1. Juchasin, fol. 57. 1.((c) Juchasin, fol. 99. 1.((d) lb. fol. 105. 1.Lu 10:38-42. Martha and Mary.

38. certain village—Bethany (Joh 11:1), which Luke so speaks of, having no farther occasion to notice it.

received him … her house—The house belonged to her, and she appears throughout to be the older sister.10:38-42 A good sermon is not the worse for being preached in a house; and the visits of our friends should be so managed, as to make them turn to the good of their souls. Sitting at Christ's feet, signifies readiness to receive his word, and submission to the guidance of it. Martha was providing for the entertainment of Christ, and those that came with him. Here were respect to our Lord Jesus and right care of her household affairs. But there was something to be blamed. She was for much serving; plenty, variety, and exactness. Worldly business is a snare to us, when it hinders us from serving God, and getting good to our souls. What needless time is wasted, and expense often laid out, even in entertaining professors of the gospel! Though Martha was on this occasion faulty, yet she was a true believer, and in her general conduct did not neglect the one thing needful. The favour of God is needful to our happiness; the salvation of Christ is needful to our safety. Where this is attended to, all other things will be rightly pursued. Christ declared, Mary hath chosen the good part. For one thing is needful, this one thing that she has done, to give up herself to the guidance of Christ. The things of this life will be taken away from us, at the furthest, when we shall be taken away from them; but nothing shall separate from the love of Christ, and a part in that love. Men and devils cannot take it away from us, and God and Christ will not. Let us mind the one thing needful more diligently.
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