Hebrews 1:10
Parallel Verses
New International Version
He also says, "In the beginning, Lord, you laid the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of your hands.

New Living Translation
He also says to the Son, "In the beginning, Lord, you laid the foundation of the earth and made the heavens with your hands.

English Standard Version
And, “You, Lord, laid the foundation of the earth in the beginning, and the heavens are the work of your hands;

New American Standard Bible
And, "YOU, LORD, IN THE BEGINNING LAID THE FOUNDATION OF THE EARTH, AND THE HEAVENS ARE THE WORKS OF YOUR HANDS;

King James Bible
And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:

Holman Christian Standard Bible
And: In the beginning, Lord, You established the earth, and the heavens are the works of Your hands;

International Standard Version
And, "In the beginning, Lord, you laid the foundation of the earth, and the heavens are the work of your hands.

NET Bible
And, "You founded the earth in the beginning, Lord, and the heavens are the works of your hands.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And again, “You have laid the foundation of The Earth from the beginning and the Heavens are the work of your hands.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
God also said, "Lord, in the beginning you laid the foundation of the earth. With your own hands you made the heavens.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:

King James 2000 Bible
And, you, Lord, in the beginning have laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of your hands:

American King James Version
And, You, Lord, in the beginning have laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of your hands:

American Standard Version
And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning didst lay the foundation of the earth, And the heavens are the works of thy hands:

Douay-Rheims Bible
And: Thou in the beginning, O Lord, didst found the earth: and the works of thy hands are the heavens.

Darby Bible Translation
And, *Thou* in the beginning, Lord, hast founded the earth, and works of thy hands are the heavens.

English Revised Version
And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth, And the heavens are the works of thy hands:

Webster's Bible Translation
And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens are the works of thy hands.

Weymouth New Testament
It is also of His Son that God says, "Thou, O Lord, in the beginning didst lay the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of Thy hands.

World English Bible
And, "You, Lord, in the beginning, laid the foundation of the earth. The heavens are the works of your hands.

Young's Literal Translation
and, 'Thou, at the beginning, Lord, the earth didst found, and a work of thy hands are the heavens;
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

1:4-14 Many Jews had a superstitious or idolatrous respect for angels, because they had received the law and other tidings of the Divine will by their ministry. They looked upon them as mediators between God and men, and some went so far as to pay them a kind of religious homage or worship. Thus it was necessary that the apostle should insist, not only on Christ's being the Creator of all things, and therefore of angels themselves, but as being the risen and exalted Messiah in human nature, to whom angels, authorities, and powers are made subject. To prove this, several passages are brought from the Old Testament. On comparing what God there says of the angels, with what he says to Christ, the inferiority of the angels to Christ plainly appears. Here is the office of the angels; they are God's ministers or servants, to do his pleasure. But, how much greater things are said of Christ by the Father! And let us own and honour him as God; for if he had not been God, he had never done the Mediator's work, and had never worn the Mediator's crown. It is declared how Christ was qualified for the office of Mediator, and how he was confirmed in it: he has the name Messiah from his being anointed. Only as Man he has his fellows, and as anointed with the Holy Spirit; but he is above all prophets, priests, and kings, that ever were employed in the service of God on earth. Another passage of Scripture, Ps 102:25-27, is recited, in which the Almighty power of the Lord Jesus Christ is declared, both in creating the world and in changing it. Christ will fold up this world as a garment, not to be abused any longer, not to be used as it has been. As a sovereign, when his garments of state are folded and put away, is a sovereign still, so our Lord, when he has laid aside the earth and heavens like a vesture, shall be still the same. Let us not then set our hearts upon that which is not what we take it to be, and will not be what it now is. Sin has made a great change in the world for the worse, and Christ will make a great change in it for the better. Let the thoughts of this make us watchful, diligent, and desirous of that better world. The Saviour has done much to make all men his friends, yet he has enemies. But they shall be made his footstool, by humble submission, or by utter destruction. Christ shall go on conquering and to conquer. The most exalted angels are but ministering spirits, mere servants of Christ, to execute his commands. The saints, at present, are heirs, not yet come into possession. The angels minister to them in opposing the malice and power of evil spirits, in protecting and keeping their bodies, instructing and comforting their souls, under Christ and the Holy Ghost. Angels shall gather all the saints together at the last day, when all whose hearts and hopes are set upon perishing treasures and fading glories, will be driven from Christ's presence into everlasting misery.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 10-12. - And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning, etc. The bearing of this quotation (from Psalm 102:25-27) on the argument in hand is not at first sight obvious; since, in the psalm, the address is plainly to God, without any mention of, or apparent reference to, the Son. The psalm is entitled, "A prayer of the afflicted, when he is overwhelmed, and poureth out his complaint before the LORD." It seems likely, from its contents, to have been written by some suffering saint during the Babylonian captivity: for its purport is a prayer, rising into confident expectation for deliverance from a state of deep affliction, Israel being in captivity and Jerusalem in ruins. The prayed-for and expected deliverance, portrayed in vers. 16-24, corresponds so closely, both in thought and expression, with that pictured in the latter chapters of Isaiah (beginning at Hebrews 40.),that we cannot hesitate in assigning the same meaning to both. There is, for instance, the looking down of the Loan from. heaven to behold the affliction of his people (cf. Isaiah 63:15); the setting free of captives (cf. Isaiah 42:7; Isaiah 61:1); the rebuilding and restoration of Zion, and in connection with this the conversion of the Gentiles to serve the Lore) with Israel (cf. Isaiah 40. - 66; and especially Isaiah 59:19; Isaiah 60:2). These are specimens of the general correspondence between the two pictures, which must be evident to all who have studied both. But the ultimate reference of Isaiah's prophecy is certainly Messianic: wherefore that of the psalm may be concluded to be the same. And thus we have made one step in explanation of the applicability of this quotation to the argument of the Epistle in confirming its ultimate reference to the Messiah's advent; to the final realization of the ideal of the Son, typified by theocratic kings. But we have still to account for the apparent application to the Son of what, in the original psalm, shows no sign of being addressed to him. One view is that there is no intention in the Epistle of quoting it as addressed to him, the phrase, πρὸς τὸν υἱόν (as has been seen) not of necessity implying such intention. According to this view, the point of the quotation is that the Messianic salvation is made to rest solely on the eternity and immutability of God - of him who, as he created all at first, so, though heaven and earth should pass away, remains unchanged. And the character of the salvation, thus regarded, is conceived to carry with it the transcendent super-angelic dignity of its accomplisher, the SON. So, in effect, Ebrard, who dwells on this as one example of the general character of apostolical exegesis, as opposed to rabbinical, in that, instead of drawing inferences, often arbitrary, from isolated words or phrases, the apostolic interpreters draw all their arguments from the spirit of the passages considered in their connection and this with a depth of intuition peculiar to themselves. Other commentators consider it more consistent with both the context and the argument to see, in the Epistle at least, an intended address to the Son. If this be so, our conclusion must be that this application of the psalmist's words is the inspired writer's own; since it is certainly not apparent in the psalm. It by no means follows that the writer of the Epistle foisted, consciously or unconsciously, a false meaning into the psalm. Even apart from the consideration of his being an inspired contributor to the New Testament canon, he was too learned in Scripture, and too able a reasoner, to adduce an evidently untenable argument. He may be understood as himself applying the passage in a way which he does not mean to imply was intended by the psalmist. His drift may be, "You have seen how in Psalm 45. the Son is addressed as God, and as having an eternal throne. Yea, so Divine is he that the address to the everlasting God himself in another psalm prophetic of his advent may be truly recognized as an address to him." Whichever view we take of this difficult passage, this at any rate is evident - that the inspired writer of the Epistle, apart from the question of the relevancy of quotation in the way of argument, associated Christ in his own mind with the unchangeable Creator of all things.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

And thou Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth,.... The person here addressed, as the Lord or Jehovah, and as the Maker of the heavens and the earth, is the same with the Son spoken to, and of, before; for the words are a continuation of the speech to him, though they are taken from another psalm, from Psalm 102:25. The phrase, "thou, Lord" is taken from Psalm 102:12 and is the same with, "O my God", Psalm 102:24 and whereas it is there said, "of old", and here, in the beginning, the sense is the same; and agreeably to the Septuagint, and the apostle, Jarchi interprets it by "at", or "from the beginning"; and so the Targum paraphrases it, , "from the beginning", that the creatures were created, &c. that in the beginning of the creation, which is the apostle's meaning; and shows the eternity of Christ, the Lord, the Creator of the earth, who must exist before the foundation of the world; and confutes the notion of the eternity of the world: and the rounding of it shows that the earth is the lower part of the creation; and denotes the stability of it; and points out the wisdom of the Creator in laying such a foundation; and proves the deity of Christ, by whom that, and all things in it, were made:

the heavens are the works of thine hands: there are more heavens than one; there are the airy heaven, and the starry heaven, and the heaven of heavens, the third heaven; and they were created the beginning, as the earth was, Genesis 1:1 and are the immediate work of Christ; they were made by himself, not by the means of angels, who were not in being till these were made; nor by any intermediate help, which he could not have, and which he did not need: the phrase is expressive of the power of Christ in making the upper parts of the creation, and of his wisdom in garnishing them, in which there is a wonderful display of his glory; and the whole serves to set forth the dignity and excellency of his person.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

10. And—In another passage (Ps 102:25-27) He says.

in the beginning—English Version, Ps 102:25, "of old": Hebrew, "before," "aforetime." The Septuagint, "in the beginning" (as in Ge 1:1) answers by contrast to the end implied in "They shall perish," &c. The Greek order here (not in the Septuagint) is, "Thou in the beginning, O Lord," which throws the "Lord" into emphasis. "Christ is preached even in passages where many might contend that the Father was principally intended" [Bengel].

laid the foundation of—"firmly founded" is included in the idea of the Greek.

heavens—plural: not merely one, but manifold, and including various orders of heavenly intelligences (Eph 4:10).

works of thine hands—the heavens, as a woven veil or curtain spread out.

Hebrews 1:10 Additional Commentaries
Context
The Supremacy of the Son
9"YOU HAVE LOVED RIGHTEOUSNESS AND HATED LAWLESSNESS; THEREFORE GOD, YOUR GOD, HAS ANOINTED YOU WITH THE OIL OF GLADNESS ABOVE YOUR COMPANIONS." 10And, "YOU, LORD, IN THE BEGINNING LAID THE FOUNDATION OF THE EARTH, AND THE HEAVENS ARE THE WORKS OF YOUR HANDS; 11THEY WILL PERISH, BUT YOU REMAIN; AND THEY ALL WILL BECOME OLD LIKE A GARMENT,…
Cross References
Genesis 1:1
In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

Psalm 102:25
In the beginning you laid the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of your hands.

Isaiah 40:12
Who has measured the waters in the hollow of his hand, or with the breadth of his hand marked off the heavens? Who has held the dust of the earth in a basket, or weighed the mountains on the scales and the hills in a balance?

Isaiah 48:13
My own hand laid the foundations of the earth, and my right hand spread out the heavens; when I summon them, they all stand up together.

Isaiah 51:6
Lift up your eyes to the heavens, look at the earth beneath; the heavens will vanish like smoke, the earth will wear out like a garment and its inhabitants die like flies. But my salvation will last forever, my righteousness will never fail.

Zechariah 12:1
A prophecy: The word of the LORD concerning Israel. The LORD, who stretches out the heavens, who lays the foundation of the earth, and who forms the human spirit within a person, declares:

Hebrews 12:27
The words "once more" indicate the removing of what can be shaken--that is, created things--so that what cannot be shaken may remain.
Treasury of Scripture

And, You, Lord, in the beginning have laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of your hands:

Thou.

Psalm 102:25-27 Of old have you laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens …

in.

Genesis 1:1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

John 1:1-3 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the …

Revelation 3:14 And to the angel of the church of the Laodiceans write; These things …

hast.

Proverbs 8:29 When he gave to the sea his decree, that the waters should not pass …

Isaiah 42:5 Thus said God the LORD, he that created the heavens, and stretched …

Isaiah 48:13 My hand also has laid the foundation of the earth, and my right hand …

Isaiah 51:13 And forget the LORD your maker, that has stretched forth the heavens, …

Jeremiah 32:17 Ah Lord GOD! behold, you have made the heaven and the earth by your …

Zechariah 12:1 The burden of the word of the LORD for Israel, said the LORD, which …

the works.

Deuteronomy 4:19 And lest you lift up your eyes to heaven, and when you see the sun, …

Psalm 8:3,4 When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon …

Psalm 19:1 The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows his handiwork.

Isaiah 64:8 But now, O LORD, you are our father; we are the clay, and you our …

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