Acts 10:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was known as the Italian Regiment.

New Living Translation
In Caesarea there lived a Roman army officer named Cornelius, who was a captain of the Italian Regiment.

English Standard Version
At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion of what was known as the Italian Cohort,

Berean Study Bible
At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was called the Italian Regiment.

Berean Literal Bible
Now a certain man in Caesarea named Cornelius was a centurion of the Cohort that is called Italian,

New American Standard Bible
Now there was a man at Caesarea named Cornelius, a centurion of what was called the Italian cohort,

King James Bible
There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
There was a man in Caesarea named Cornelius, a centurion of what was called the Italian Regiment.

International Standard Version
Now in Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was known as the Italian Regiment.

NET Bible
Now there was a man in Caesarea named Cornelius, a centurion of what was known as the Italian Cohort.

New Heart English Bible
Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of what was called the Italian Regiment,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But in Qesaria was a certain man, a Centurion whose name was Cornelius, from the regiment which is called Italiqa.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
A man named Cornelius lived in the city of Caesarea. He was a Roman army officer in the Italian Regiment.

New American Standard 1977
Now there was a certain man at Caesarea named Cornelius, a centurion of what was called the Italian cohort,

Jubilee Bible 2000
There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the company called the Italian,

King James 2000 Bible
There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

American King James Version
There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

American Standard Version
Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of the band called the Italian band ,

Douay-Rheims Bible
AND there was a certain man in Caesarea, named Cornelius, a centurion of that which is called the Italian band;

Darby Bible Translation
But a certain man in Caesarea, -- by name Cornelius, a centurion of the band called Italic,

English Revised Version
Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

Webster's Bible Translation
There was a certain man in Cesarea, called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

Weymouth New Testament
Now a Captain of the Italian Regiment, named Cornelius, was quartered at Caesarea.

World English Bible
Now there was a certain man in Caesarea, Cornelius by name, a centurion of what was called the Italian Regiment,

Young's Literal Translation
And there was a certain man in Caesarea, by name Cornelius, a centurion from a band called Italian,
Study Bible
Cornelius Sends for Peter
1At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was called the Italian Regiment. 2He and all his household were devout and God-fearing. He gave generously to the people and prayed to God regularly.…
Cross References
Matthew 27:27
Then the governor's soldiers took Jesus into the Praetorium and gathered the whole company around Him.

Mark 15:16
Then the soldiers led Jesus away into the palace (that is, the Praetorium) and called the whole company together.

John 18:3
So Judas brought a band of soldiers and officers from the chief priests and Pharisees. They arrived at the garden carrying lanterns, torches, and weapons.

John 18:12
Then the band of soldiers, with its commander and the officers of the Jews, arrested Jesus and bound Him.

Acts 8:40
But Philip appeared at Azotus and traveled through that region, preaching the gospel in all the towns until he came to Caesarea.

Acts 10:24
The following day he arrived in Caesarea, where Cornelius was expecting them and had called together his relatives and close friends.

Acts 21:31
While they were trying to kill him, the commander of the Roman regiment received a report that all Jerusalem was in turmoil.

Acts 27:1
When it was decided that we would sail for Italy, Paul and some other prisoners were handed over to a centurion named Julius, who belonged to the Augustan Regiment.
Treasury of Scripture

There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band,

Cir. A.M.

Acts 8:40 But Philip was found at Azotus: and passing through he preached in …

Acts 21:8 And the next day we that were of Paul's company departed, and came …

Acts 23:23,33 And he called to him two centurions, saying, Make ready two hundred …

Acts 25:1,13 Now when Festus was come into the province, after three days he ascended …

a centurion.

Acts 22:25 And as they bound him with thongs, Paul said to the centurion that …

Acts 27:1,31,43 And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered …

Matthew 8:5 And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came to him a centurion, …

Matthew 27:54 Now when the centurion, and they that were with him, watching Jesus, …

Luke 7:2 And a certain centurion's servant, who was dear to him, was sick, …

Italian. The Italian band, or rather cohort, [speira,] (a regiment sometimes consisting of from

Acts 27:1 And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered …

X.

(1) There was a certain man in Csarea.--We enter on a new stage of expansion in the Church's growth, the full details of which St. Luke may have learnt either from Philip the Evangelist during his stay at Csarea (Acts 21:8; Acts 24:27) or, possibly, from Cornelius himself. His admission into the Church, even if it were not the first instance of the reception of a Gentile convert as such, became, through its supernatural accompaniments and (in the strict sense of that word) its "prerogative" character, the ruling case on the subject. Whether it were earlier or later than the admission of the Gentiles recorded in Acts 11:20, we have no adequate data for determining. (See Note on that passage.)

Csarea was at this time the usual residence of the Roman Procurator of Juda, and was consequently garrisoned by Roman troops. Greeks, Jews, and Romans, probably also Phnicians and other traders, were mingled freely in its population.

Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian band.--The office was a comparatively subordinate one, the centurion commanding the sixth part of a cohort, the sixtieth part of a legion. The Greek implies that he belonged to the cohort, not that he commanded it. The name Cornelius may indicate a connection with the great Cornelian gens which had been made famous by the Gracchi and by Sylla. The bands, or cohorts, stationed at Csarea consisted chiefly of auxiliaries levied from the province (Jos. Wars, ii. 13, 6), who were not always to be relied on in times of popular excitement, and this cohort was accordingly distinguished from the others as Italian, i.e., as being at least commanded by Roman officers. A first Italian legion is repeatedly mentioned by Tacitus (Hist. i. 59, 64; c. 100; iii. 22), but this is said by Dion (lv. 24) to have been first raised by Nero; and the term which St. Luke uses for band (spira) was, strictly speaking, not used of the legions, the latter term being applied exclusively to Roman troops. In Acts 27:1 we meet with another of these cohorts, also at Csarea, known as the Augustan.

Verse 1. - Now there was (two last words in italics) for there was (in roman), A.V. and T.R.; Cornelius by name for called Cornelius, A.V. A glance at the map will show that Caesarea (see note to Acts 9:30) was but a short distance, some thirty miles, from Joppa. It was doubtless with a view to Peter's momentous errand to Caesarea that Luke recorded his previous visit to Lydda and his residence at Joppa, consequent upon the restoring of Dorcas to life: the origines of Gentile Christianity being the prime object of the Acts (see Introduction to the Acts). The Italian band; or, cohort (σπείρα). The σπείρα, or cohort, was used in two senses. When spoken of strictly Roman troops, it meant the tenth part of a legion, and consisted of from four hundred and twenty-five to five hundred or six hundred men, according to the strength of the legion. Its commander was called a chiliarch, and it was divided into centuries, each commanded by a centurion. But when spoken of auxiliary provincial troops, it meant a regiment of about a thousand men (Josephus, 'Bell. Jud.,' 3:42). It is in this last sense probably that it is used here. Josephus, in the passage above quoted, speaks of five such auxiliary cohorts coming from Caesarea to join Vespasian's army, and he tells us in another place ('Bell. Jud.,' 2:18, 7) that the principal portion of the Roman army at Caesarea were Syrians. It is pretty certain, therefore, that the Italian cohort here spoken of were auxiliaries, so called as being made up in whole or in part of Italians, probably volunteers or velones (Farrar, vol. 1:278, note). Another reason for this conclusion is that it does not seem likely that one of the divisions of a legion should have a name (though it was very common for the legions themselves to be distinguished, in addition to their number, prima, secunda, decima, etc., by such names as Italics, Parthica, Augusta, etc.), but that separate regiments would naturally have appropriate names for the same reason that the legions had. Thus, besides the Italian cohort here named, we have the Augustan cohort in Acts 27:1. It might be important for the security of the procurator, in so turbulent a province as Judaea, to have at least one cohort of Italian soldiers at the seat of government. Renan ('Apotres,' p. 202) thinks the full name of the cohort may have been "Cohors prima Augusta Italica civium Romanorum;" and adds that there were in the whole empire not fewer than thirty-two cohorts bearing the name of Italian. There was a certain man in Caesarea,.... This was the Caesarea formerly called Strato's tower, not Caesarea Philippi; for the former, and not the latter, lay near Joppa:

called Cornelius; which was a Roman name, and he himself was a Roman or an Italian:

a centurion of the band called the Italian band; which consisted of soldiers collected out of Italy, from whence the band took its name, in which Cornelius was a centurion, having a hundred men under him, as the name of his office signifies. CHAPTER 10

Ac 10:1-48. Accession and Baptism of Cornelius and His Party; or, The First-fruits of the Gentiles.

We here enter on an entirely new phase of the Christian Church, the "opening of the door of faith to the Gentiles"; in other words, the recognition of Gentile, on terms of perfect equality with Jewish, discipleship without the necessity of circumcision. Some beginnings appear to have been already made in this direction (see on [1981]Ac 11:20, 21); and Saul probably acted on this principle from the first, both in Arabia and in Syria and Cilicia. But had he been the prime mover in the admission of uncircumcised Gentiles into the Church, the Jewish party, who were never friendly to him, would have acquired such strength as to bring the Church to the verge of a disastrous schism. But on Peter, "the apostle" specially "of the circumcision," was conferred the honor of initiating this great movement, as before of the first admission of Jewish believers. (See on [1982]Mt 16:19). After this, however, one who had already come upon the stage was to eclipse this "chiefest of the apostles."

1, 2. Cæsarea—(See on [1983]Ac 8:40).

the Italian band—a cohort of Italians, as distinguished from native soldiers, quartered at Cæsarea, probably as a bodyguard to the Roman procurator who resided there. An ancient coin makes express mention of such a cohort in Syria. [Akerman, Numismatic Illustrations of the New Testament.]10:1-8 Hitherto none had been baptized into the Christian church but Jews, Samaritans, and those converts who had been circumcised and observed the ceremonial law; but now the Gentiles were to be called to partake all the privileges of God's people, without first becoming Jews. Pure and undefiled religion is sometimes found where we least expect it. Wherever the fear of God rules in the heart, it will appear both in works of charity and of piety, neither will excuse from the other. Doubtless Cornelius had true faith in God's word, as far as he understood it, though not as yet clear faith in Christ. This was the work of the Spirit of God, through the mediation of Jesus, even before Cornelius knew him, as is the case with us all when we, who before were dead in sin, are made alive. Through Christ also his prayers and alms were accepted, which otherwise would have been rejected. Without dispute or delay Cornelius was obedient to the heavenly vision. In the affairs of our souls, let us not lose time.
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