Matthew 18:23
New International Version
"Therefore, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

New Living Translation
"Therefore, the Kingdom of Heaven can be compared to a king who decided to bring his accounts up to date with servants who had borrowed money from him.

English Standard Version
“Therefore the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his servants.

Berean Study Bible
Because of this, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

Berean Literal Bible
Because of this, the kingdom of the heavens has become like to a man, a king, who desired to settle accounts with his servants.

New American Standard Bible
"For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves.

King James Bible
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a certain king, which would take account of his servants.

Christian Standard Bible
"For this reason, the kingdom of heaven can be compared to a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

Contemporary English Version
This story will show you what the kingdom of heaven is like: One day a king decided to call in his officials and ask them to give an account of what they owed him.

Good News Translation
because the Kingdom of heaven is like this. Once there was a king who decided to check on his servants' accounts.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For this reason, the kingdom of heaven can be compared to a king who wanted to settle accounts with his slaves.

International Standard Version
"That is why the kingdom from heaven may be compared to a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

NET Bible
"For this reason, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his slaves.

New Heart English Bible
Therefore the Kingdom of Heaven is like a certain king, who wanted to reconcile accounts with his servants.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Therefore the Kingdom of Heaven is compared to a man who was a King, wanting to take an account of his servants.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"That is why the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants.

New American Standard 1977
“For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a certain king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Therefore is the kingdom of the heavens likened unto a man who is king who would take account of his slaves.

King James 2000 Bible
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a certain king, who would take account of his servants.

American King James Version
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened to a certain king, which would take account of his servants.

American Standard Version
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a certain king, who would make a reckoning with his servants.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened to a king, who would take an account of his servants.

Darby Bible Translation
For this cause the kingdom of the heavens has become like a king who would reckon with his bondmen.

English Revised Version
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a certain king, which would make a reckoning with his servants.

Webster's Bible Translation
Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened to a certain king who would take account of his servants.

Weymouth New Testament
"For this reason the Kingdom of the Heavens may be compared to a king who determined to have a settlement of accounts with his servants.

World English Bible
Therefore the Kingdom of Heaven is like a certain king, who wanted to reconcile accounts with his servants.

Young's Literal Translation
'Because of this was the reign of the heavens likened to a man, a king, who did will to take reckoning with his servants,
Study Bible
The Unforgiving Servant
22Jesus answered, “I tell you, not just seven times, but seventy-seven times! 23Because of this, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants. 24As he began the settlements, a debtor was brought to him owing ten thousand talents.…
Cross References
Matthew 7:24
Therefore everyone who hears these words of Mine and acts on them is like a wise man who built his house on the rock.

Matthew 13:24
Jesus presented another parable to them: "The kingdom of heaven is like a man who sowed good seed in his field.

Matthew 18:24
As he began the settlements, a debtor was brought to him owing ten thousand talents.

Matthew 25:19
After a long time, the master of those servants returned to settle accounts with them.

Treasury of Scripture

Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened to a certain king, which would take account of his servants.

is.

Matthew 3:2
And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

Matthew 13:24,31,33,44,45,47,52
Another parable put he forth unto them, saying, The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a man which sowed good seed in his field: …

Matthew 25:1,14
Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten virgins, which took their lamps, and went forth to meet the bridegroom…

which.

Matthew 25:19-30
After a long time the lord of those servants cometh, and reckoneth with them…

Luke 16:1,2
And he said also unto his disciples, There was a certain rich man, which had a steward; and the same was accused unto him that he had wasted his goods…

Luke 19:12-27
He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return…







Lexicon
Because of
Διὰ (Dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

this,
τοῦτο (touto)
Demonstrative Pronoun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3778: This; he, she, it.

the
(hē)
Article - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

kingdom
βασιλεία (basileia)
Noun - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 932: From basileus; properly, royalty, i.e. rule, or a realm.

of
τῶν (tōn)
Article - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

heaven
οὐρανῶν (ouranōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3772: Perhaps from the same as oros; the sky; by extension, heaven; by implication, happiness, power, eternity; specially, the Gospel.

is like
ὡμοιώθη (hōmoiōthē)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 3666: To make like, liken; I compare. From homoios; to assimilate, i.e. Compare; passively, to become similar.

a king
βασιλεῖ (basilei)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 935: A king, ruler, but in some passages clearly to be translated: emperor. Probably from basis; a sovereign.

who
ὃς (hos)
Personal / Relative Pronoun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3739: Who, which, what, that.

wanted
ἠθέλησεν (ēthelēsen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2309: To will, wish, desire, be willing, intend, design.

to settle
συνᾶραι (synarai)
Verb - Aorist Infinitive Active
Strong's Greek 4868: To compare (settle) accounts, make a reckoning. From sun and airo; to make up together, i.e. to compute.

accounts
λόγον (logon)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3056: From lego; something said; by implication, a topic, also reasoning or motive; by extension, a computation; specially, the Divine Expression.

with
μετὰ (meta)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 3326: (a) gen: with, in company with, (b) acc: (1) behind, beyond, after, of place, (2) after, of time, with nouns, neut. of adjectives.

his
αὐτοῦ (autou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

servants.
δούλων (doulōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 1401: (a) (as adj.) enslaved, (b) (as noun) a (male) slave. From deo; a slave.
(23) Therefore is the kingdom of heaven likened . . .--Over and above the direct teaching of the parable it has the interest, as regards its form, of being, in some sense, an advance on those of chapter 13, i.e., as more fully bringing out human interests, and so more after the pattern of those that are characteristic of St. Luke.

Verses 23-35. - Christ illustrates his precept by the parable of the unmerciful servant, and the stern lesson which he himself enunciates at its close. Verse 23. - Therefore; i.e. because such is the infinite nature of the pardon to be meted out to an offending brother. The kingdom of heaven. The rule observed in the government of Christ's kingdom with regard to forgiveness is represented by the procedure of a certain earthly king. The picture supposes some great Oriental potentate, with numerous viceroys or satraps, who have to render to him an account of revenues received. These are called servants in the sense that, though they are high officials, they are the monarch's subordinates and dependents. Both Herodotus and Xenophon apply the term "slave" (δοῦλος) to the great officers of state. Immense sums of money would pass through their hands. This accounts for the enormous debt of the officer in the parable. Webster and Wilkinson compare the East India Company's collectors, who are high civil servants of the company, that is, now, of the government. If we regard the parable in a general light, as illustrating God's dealings with sinful man, we must see in the "taking account of his servants," not the judgment of the last day, but those many occasions when God makes a man turn his eyes inward and learn how he stands in the sight of his Lord. Such occasions are sickness, misfortune, great change of circumstances, a new year, reproach of conscience, however aroused, - these and such like incidents awaken a man to his true position, show him his delinquencies and misery. 18:21-35 Though we live wholly on mercy and forgiveness, we are backward to forgive the offences of our brethren. This parable shows how much provocation God has from his family on earth, and how untoward his servants are. There are three things in the parable: 1. The master's wonderful clemency. The debt of sin is so great, that we are not able to pay it. See here what every sin deserves; this is the wages of sin, to be sold as a slave. It is the folly of many who are under strong convictions of their sins, to fancy they can make God satisfaction for the wrong they have done him. 2. The servant's unreasonable severity toward his fellow-servant, notwithstanding his lord's clemency toward him. Not that we may make light of wronging our neighbour, for that is also a sin against God; but we should not aggravate our neighbour's wronging us, nor study revenge. Let our complaints, both of the wickedness of the wicked, and of the afflictions of the afflicted, be brought to God, and left with him. 3. The master reproved his servant's cruelty. The greatness of sin magnifies the riches of pardoning mercy; and the comfortable sense of pardoning mercy, does much to dispose our hearts to forgive our brethren. We are not to suppose that God actually forgives men, and afterwards reckons their guilt to them to condemn them; but this latter part of the parable shows the false conclusions many draw as to their sins being pardoned, though their after-conduct shows that they never entered into the spirit, or experienced the sanctifying grace of the gospel. We do not forgive our offending brother aright, if we do not forgive from the heart. Yet this is not enough; we must seek the welfare even of those who offend us. How justly will those be condemned, who, though they bear the Christian name, persist in unmerciful treatment of their brethren! The humbled sinner relies only on free, abounding mercy, through the ransom of the death of Christ. Let us seek more and more for the renewing grace of God, to teach us to forgive others as we hope for forgiveness from him.
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