Galatians 3:11
New International Version
Clearly no one who relies on the law is justified before God, because "the righteous will live by faith."

New Living Translation
So it is clear that no one can be made right with God by trying to keep the law. For the Scriptures say, "It is through faith that a righteous person has life."

English Standard Version
Now it is evident that no one is justified before God by the law, for “The righteous shall live by faith.”

Berean Study Bible
And it is clear that no one is justified before God by the Law, because, “The righteous will live by faith.”

Berean Literal Bible
Now it is evident that no one is justified before God by the law, because "The righteous will live by faith."

New American Standard Bible
Now that no one is justified by the Law before God is evident; for, "THE RIGHTEOUS MAN SHALL LIVE BY FAITH."

King James Bible
But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.

Christian Standard Bible
Now it is clear that no one is justified before God by the law, because the righteous will live by faith.

Contemporary English Version
No one can please God by obeying the Law. The Scriptures also say, "The people God accepts because of their faith will live."

Good News Translation
Now, it is clear that no one is put right with God by means of the Law, because the scripture says, "Only the person who is put right with God through faith shall live."

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Now it is clear that no one is justified before God by the law, because the righteous will live by faith.

International Standard Version
Now it is obvious that no one is justified in the sight of God by the Law, because "The righteous will live by faith."

NET Bible
Now it is clear no one is justified before God by the law, because the righteous one will live by faith.

New Heart English Bible
Now it is evident that no one is justified by the law before God, for, "The righteous will live by faith."

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But that a man is not made right with God by The Written Law, this is revealed, because it is written: “The just shall live by faith.”

GOD'S WORD® Translation
No one receives God's approval by obeying the law's standards since, "The person who has God's approval will live by faith."

New American Standard 1977
Now that no one is justified by the Law before God is evident; for, “THE RIGHTEOUS MAN SHALL LIVE BY FAITH.”

Jubilee Bible 2000
But that no one is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident, for The just shall live by faith.

King James 2000 Bible
But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.

American King James Version
But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.

American Standard Version
Now that no man is justified by the law before God, is evident: for, The righteous shall live by faith;

Douay-Rheims Bible
But that in the law no man is justified with God, it is manifest: because the just man liveth by faith.

Darby Bible Translation
but that by law no one is justified with God [is] evident, because The just shall live on the principle of faith;

English Revised Version
Now that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, is evident: for, The righteous shall live by faith;

Webster's Bible Translation
But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.

Weymouth New Testament
It is evident, too, that no one can find acceptance with God simply by obeying the Law, because "the righteous shall live by faith,"

World English Bible
Now that no man is justified by the law before God is evident, for, "The righteous will live by faith."

Young's Literal Translation
and that in law no one is declared righteous with God, is evident, because 'The righteous by faith shall live;'
Study Bible
Christ Redeemed Us
10All who rely on works of the Law are under a curse. For it is written: “Cursed is everyone who does not continue to do everything written in the Book of the Law.” 11And it is clear that no one is justified before God by the Law, because, “The righteous will live by faith.” 12The Law, however, is not based on faith; on the contrary, “The man who does these things will live by them.”…
Cross References
Habakkuk 2:4
Look at the proud one; His soul is not upright--But the righteous will live by his faith--

Romans 1:17
For the gospel reveals the righteousness of God that comes by faith from start to finish, just as it is written: "The righteous will live by faith."

Galatians 2:16
know that a man is not justified by works of the Law, but by faith in Jesus Christ. So we, too, have believed in Christ Jesus, that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by works of the Law, because by works of the Law no one will be justified.

Hebrews 10:38
But My righteous one will live by faith; and if he shrinks back, I will take no pleasure in him."

James 1:27
Pure and undefiled religion before our God and Father is this: to care for orphans and widows in their distress, and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.

Treasury of Scripture

But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.

that.

Galatians 2:16
Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law: for by the works of the law shall no flesh be justified.

1 Kings 8:46
If they sin against thee, (for there is no man that sinneth not,) and thou be angry with them, and deliver them to the enemy, so that they carry them away captives unto the land of the enemy, far or near;

Job 9:3
If he will contend with him, he cannot answer him one of a thousand.

The just.

Habakkuk 2:4
Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith.

Romans 1:17
For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith.

Hebrews 10:38
Now the just shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him.







Lexicon
And
δὲ (de)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 1161: A primary particle; but, and, etc.

it is clear
δῆλον (dēlon)
Adjective - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 1212: Clear, manifest, evident. Of uncertain derivation; clear.

that
ὅτι (hoti)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 3754: Neuter of hostis as conjunction; demonstrative, that; causative, because.

no one
οὐδεὶς (oudeis)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3762: No one, none, nothing.

is justified
δικαιοῦται (dikaioutai)
Verb - Present Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1344: From dikaios; to render just or innocent.

before
παρὰ (para)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 3844: Gen: from; dat: beside, in the presence of; acc: alongside of.

God
Θεῷ (Theō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2316: A deity, especially the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very.

by
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

[the] Law,
νόμῳ (nomō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3551: From a primary nemo; law, genitive case, specially, (including the volume); also of the Gospel), or figuratively.

because,
ὅτι (hoti)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 3754: Neuter of hostis as conjunction; demonstrative, that; causative, because.

“The
(Ho)
Article - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

righteous
δίκαιος (dikaios)
Adjective - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 1342: From dike; equitable; by implication, innocent, holy.

will live
ζήσεται (zēsetai)
Verb - Future Indicative Middle - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2198: To live, be alive. A primary verb; to live.

by
ἐκ (ek)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1537: From out, out from among, from, suggesting from the interior outwards. A primary preposition denoting origin, from, out.

faith.”
πίστεως (pisteōs)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 4102: Faith, belief, trust, confidence; fidelity, faithfulness.
(11, 12) The Law could not bring a blessing. It could not justify. For the condition of justification is faith; and the Law has nothing to do with faith. Its standpoint was entirely different--that of works.

(11) In the sight of God.--Standing as a prisoner before His tribunal.

The just shall live by faith.--The stress is on the word "faith." It is faith (not law) which gives life. In St. Paul's application of the passage, the word "just" must be taken in what is technically termed a slightly proleptic sense. A man is not just before the exercise of faith, but he becomes just by the exercise of it; and, in another aspect, the state of righteousness upon which he then enters is also a state of life. Strictly speaking, the order is--faith, justification, life. It would be possible to take the Greek in such a way as to bring out this more distinctly: "The just by faith" (i.e., he whose righteousness is based on faith) "shall live." Some good commentators take the passage thus, but a balance of considerations seems, on the whole, to be in favour of the sense adopted in the Authorised version.

The quotation is from Habakkuk 2:4, where it refers to the preservation of the righteous Israelite amidst the general ruin caused by the Chaldean invasion. Though the wicked and proud shall be destroyed, the righteous man shall live "by his faith." There is some division of opinion amongst commentators as to whether the word translated "faith" means, in the original, faith in the active sense or faith in the passive sense--"fidelity," "faithfulness," or "trust in God." The sense in which the word is used by St Paul is most nearly related to the latter. It has the full-developed Christian meaning, which begins in belief, includes trust, and passes on to become an active energy of devotion. (Comp. the Note and Excursus on Romans 1:17, where the same quotation is made.)

Verse 11. - But that no man is justified by the Law in the sight of God, it is evident (ὅτι δὲ ἐν νόμῳ οὐδεὶς δικαιοῦται παρὰ τῷ Θεῷ); but that in the Law no man is justified with God, is evident. To "be justified" means to be brought out of a state of guiltiness and cursedness into a state of acceptance. The apostle, assuming that every one is guilty and under a curse, now shows that the Law offers no means of justification. "But." The apostle is meeting the notion that, though one who is of works of the Law is evermore threatened with a curse ready to light down upon him, and though the curse has been, as it cannot but have been, actually incurred, yet, by setting himself afresh to the endeavour and thenceforward continuing steadfast in all things written in the Law, he may thus win pardon and righteousness with God. To obviate this conception, without stopping to insist upon the fact that through indwelling sin no man possibly can continue in all the things written in the Law, he puts the notion aside by stating that this is not the method of justification which Scripture recognizes. This he shows by adducing that cardinal aphorism of Habakkuk, by which, as it should seem, the apostle was wont to substantiate the doctrine of justification by faith (comp. Romans 1:17; Hebrews 10:38). The way in which the passage is here introduced, almost as an obiter dictum, and as if not needing a formal indication of its coming out of Scripture, suggests the feeling that the passage, as taken in the sense in which the apostle reads it, was one already familiar to his readers, no doubt through his own former teaching. When in the Acts (Acts 13:39-41) we read that in the synagogue at the Pisidian Antioch, in close connection with the statement that through believing in Christ a man is justified, he cited another passage of Habakkuk (Habakkuk 1:5), denouncing unbelieving despisers, we cannot doubt that he had made good his statement about justification by alleging this same probative text. "In the Law;" that is, as being it. the sphere and domain of the Law. Compare the use of the same preposition: Romans 2:12, "As many as have sinned under [Greek, 'in'] the Law;" 3:19, "It saith to them that are under [Greek, 'in'] the Law." An exactly parallel construction is found in Acts 13:39, "From all things from which ye could not by [Greek, 'in'] the Law be justified." They could not as being in the Law find therein any means of gaining acceptance. "Is justified with God;" comes to be accounted righteous with him. "With God;" not merely outwardly, Levitically, in the judgment of a Levitical priest - but inwardly and in reality, in God's estimation. The preposition "with" (παρά) is used similarly in Romans 2:13, "For not the hearers of the Law are righteous with God;" 1 Corinthians 3:19, "The wisdom of this world is foolishness with God." It is God himself that justifies the sinner (Romans 3:30; Romans 4:5); but the apostle does not write "is justified by God," because he is confronting the notion so natural to man, and above all, to the Judaizing legalist, that a man is to make himself righteous by doings - ceremonial or moral - of his own. For, The just shall live by faith (ὁ δίκαιος ἐκ πίστεως ζήσεται); the righteous by faith shall live. The apostle is not weaving the prophet's words into his own sentence simply as aptly expressing his own thought, but is citing them probatively as words of Scripture; as if he had said, "As Scripture saith, The righteous," etc. The same is the case with the words introduced in the next verse out of Leviticus; so Romans 9:7. In Romans 15:3 and 1 Corinthians 2:9 the apostle inserts, "according as it is written," as in parenthesis, before adding the words of Scripture in such a way as to form a continuation of his own sentence. "The righteous by faith shall live;" that is, the righteous man shall draw his life from his faith. It is generally agreed upon by Hebrew scholars that in the original passage (Habakkuk 2:4) the words, "by his faith" (or possibly, adopting another reading of the Hebrew text, "by my faith," that is, by faith in me) belong to "shall live," rather than to "the righteous" (see on this point Delitzsch on Hebrews 10:38, and Canon Cook on Habakkuk 2:4, in 'Speaker's Commentary'). And that St. Paul so understood it is made probable by the contrasted citation of" shall live in them "in the next verse. With this conjunction of the words, the passage suits the apostle's purpose perfect]y; for if it is by or from his faith that the righteous man lives, then it is by or from his faith that he gets to be accepted by God as righteous. The "faith" spoken of is shown by the context in Habakkuk to mean such reliance upon God as is of a steadfast character, and not a mere fleeting or occasional acceptance of God's promises as true. This is plainly the view of the passage which is taken by the Pauline writer of the Hebrews in Hebrews 10:38. 3:6-14 The apostle proves the doctrine he had blamed the Galatians for rejecting; namely, that of justification by faith without the works of the law. This he does from the example of Abraham, whose faith fastened upon the word and promise of God, and upon his believing he was owned and accepted of God as a righteous man. The Scripture is said to foresee, because the Holy Spirit that indited the Scripture did foresee. Through faith in the promise of God he was blessed; and it is only in the same way that others obtain this privilege. Let us then study the object, nature, and effects of Abraham's faith; for who can in any other way escape the curse of the holy law? The curse is against all sinners, therefore against all men; for all have sinned, and are become guilty before God: and if, as transgressors of the law, we are under its curse, it must be vain to look for justification by it. Those only are just or righteous who are freed from death and wrath, and restored into a state of life in the favour of God; and it is only through faith that persons become righteous. Thus we see that justification by faith is no new doctrine, but was taught in the church of God, long before the times of the gospel. It is, in truth, the only way wherein any sinners ever were, or can be justified. Though deliverance is not to be expected from the law, there is a way open to escape the curse, and regain the favour of God, namely, through faith in Christ. Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law; being made sin, or a sin-offering, for us, he was made a curse for us; not separated from God, but laid for a time under the Divine punishment. The heavy sufferings of the Son of God, more loudly warn sinners to flee from the wrath to come, than all the curses of the law; for how can God spare any man who remains under sin, seeing that he spared not his own Son, when our sins were charged upon him? Yet at the same time, Christ, as from the cross, freely invites sinners to take refuge in him.
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