Psalm 19:12
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
But who can discern their own errors? Forgive my hidden faults.

New Living Translation
How can I know all the sins lurking in my heart? Cleanse me from these hidden faults.

English Standard Version
Who can discern his errors? Declare me innocent from hidden faults.

New American Standard Bible
Who can discern his errors? Acquit me of hidden faults.

King James Bible
Who can understand his errors? cleanse thou me from secret faults.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Who perceives his unintentional sins? Cleanse me from my hidden faults.

International Standard Version
Who can detect his own mistake? Cleanse me from hidden sin.

NET Bible
Who can know all his errors? Please do not punish me for sins I am unaware of.

New Heart English Bible
Who can discern his errors? Forgive me from hidden errors.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Who understands offenses? Acquit me from secret sins.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Who can notice every mistake? Forgive my hidden faults.

JPS Tanakh 1917
Who can discern his errors? Clear Thou me from hidden faults.

New American Standard 1977
Who can discern his errors? Acquit me of hidden faults.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Who can understand his errors? cleanse thou me from secret faults.

King James 2000 Bible
Who can understand his errors? cleanse me from secret faults.

American King James Version
Who can understand his errors? cleanse you me from secret faults.

American Standard Version
Who can discern his errors? Clear thou me from hidden faults .

Douay-Rheims Bible
Who can understand sins? from my secret ones cleanse me, O Lord:

Darby Bible Translation
Who understandeth [his] errors? Purify me from secret [faults].

English Revised Version
Who can discern his errors? clear thou me from hidden faults.

Webster's Bible Translation
Who can understand his errors? cleanse thou me from secret faults.

World English Bible
Who can discern his errors? Forgive me from hidden errors.

Young's Literal Translation
Errors! who doth understand? From hidden ones declare me innocent,
Study Bible
The Heavens Declare the Glory of God
11Moreover, by them Your servant is warned; In keeping them there is great reward. 12Who can discern his errors? Acquit me of hidden faults. 13Also keep back Your servant from presumptuous sins; Let them not rule over me; Then I will be blameless, And I shall be acquitted of great transgression.…
Cross References
Psalm 18:23
I was also blameless with Him, And I kept myself from my iniquity.

Psalm 40:12
For evils beyond number have surrounded me; My iniquities have overtaken me, so that I am not able to see; They are more numerous than the hairs of my head, And my heart has failed me.

Psalm 51:1
For the choir director. A Psalm of David, when Nathan the prophet came to him, after he had gone in to Bathsheba. Be gracious to me, O God, according to Your lovingkindness; According to the greatness of Your compassion blot out my transgressions.

Psalm 51:2
Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity And cleanse me from my sin.

Psalm 90:8
You have placed our iniquities before You, Our secret sins in the light of Your presence.

Psalm 139:6
Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; It is too high, I cannot attain to it.

Psalm 139:23
Search me, O God, and know my heart; Try me and know my anxious thoughts;

Psalm 139:24
And see if there be any hurtful way in me, And lead me in the everlasting way.

Ezekiel 45:20
"Thus you shall do on the seventh day of the month for everyone who goes astray or is naive; so you shall make atonement for the house.
Treasury of Scripture

Who can understand his errors? cleanse you me from secret faults.

can

Psalm 40:12 For innumerable evils have compassed me about: my iniquities have …

Job 6:24 Teach me, and I will hold my tongue: and cause me to understand wherein …

Isaiah 64:6 But we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are …

1 Corinthians 4:4 For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but …

Hebrews 9:7 But into the second went the high priest alone once every year, not …

cleanse

Psalm 51:5-10 Behold, I was shaped in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me…

Psalm 65:3 Iniquities prevail against me: as for our transgressions, you shall …

1 John 1:7 But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship …

secret

Psalm 90:8 You have set our iniquities before you, our secret sins in the light …

Psalm 139:2,23,24 You know my sitting down and my rising up, you understand my thought afar off…

Leviticus 4:2 Speak to the children of Israel, saying…

Jeremiah 17:9 The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: …

(12) His eulogium on the Law was not Pharisaic or formal, for the poet instantly gives expression to his sense of his own inability to keep it. If before we were reminded of St. Paul's, "The law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good," (Romans 7:12), his own spiritual experience, contained in the same chapter, is here recalled: "For the good that I would I do not: but the evil that I would not, that I do."

Who can understand.--In the original the abruptness of the question is very marked and significant. Errors who marks? From unconscious ones clear me, i.e., pronounce me innocent, not cleanse, as in Authorised Version.

Verses 12-14. - A consideration of the Law cannot but raise the thought of transgression. Man "had not known sin but by the Law" (Romans 7:7), and he cannot contemplate the Law without being reminded of possible disobedience to it. The psalmist's thoughts are led in this direction, and he ends with an earnest prayer against "secret sins" (ver. 12), against "presumptuous sins" (ver. 13), and against sins of word and thought (ver. 14), addressed to "God his Strength [or, 'his Rock'] and his Redeemer." Verse 12. - Who can understand his errors? rather, who can discern (or, perceive) his errors? i.e. all of them. Who will not overlook some, try as he may to search out his heart? Cleanse thou me from secret faults. Those which are hidden from me, which I cannot discern. Who can understand his errors?.... Sin is an error, a wandering out of the way of God, swerving from the rule of his word; and many mistakes are made by the people of God themselves; even so many that they cannot number them; they are more than the hairs of their head; they cannot understand, find out and express, neither their number, nor their evil nature, nor the many aggravating circumstances which attend them: this the psalmist said, upon a view of the large extent, glory, and excellency of the word of God; and upon comparing himself with it, in which, as in a glass, he saw how far short he came of it, and what a disagreement and want of conformity there was in him unto it; see Psalm 119:97; and he suggests, that though the word he had been describing was perfect, pure, and clean, he was not; nor could he expect any reward of debt, but merely of grace, for his observance of it; and that it was best, under a sense of sin, to have recourse, not to works of righteousness done by men; but to the grace and mercy of God in Christ, as follows:

cleanse thou me from secret faults; by which are meant not such sins as are done in secret, and are unknown to men; such as David's sin with Bathsheba, 2 Samuel 12:12; nor the inward motions of sin in the heart, to which none are privy but God, and a man's own soul; not but that each of these may be properly enough included in such a petition; but sins, which are unknown to a man himself are meant: there are some actions, which, though known when committed, are not known to be sinful ones; and there are some sins which are committed unadvisedly, and through carelessness, and pass unobserved; not only many vain and sinful thoughts pass to and fro uncontrolled, without being taken notice of; but many foolish and idle words are spoken, and many evil actions, through infirmity and inadvertency, are done, which, when a good man, at the close of a day, comes to reflect upon the things that have passed in it, are quite hidden from him, are unknown to him, being unobserved by him; wherefore such a petition is highly proper to be inserted in his address at the throne of grace: and which also supposes the person sensible of the defiling nature of sin, and of his own impotency to cleanse himself from it; and that God only can do it, who does it by the application of the blood of his Son, which cleanses from all sin; for this respects not regenerating and sanctifying grace, but pardoning grace; a manifestation of it, a view of acquittance from sin by Christ, and of freedom from obligation to punishment for it. 12 Who can understand his errors? cleanse thou me from secret faults.

13 Keep back thy servant also from presumptuous sins; let them not have dominion over me: then shall I be upright, and I shall be innocent from the great transgression,

14 Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O Lord, my strength, and my redeemer.

Psalm 19:12

"Who can understand his errors?" A question which is its own answer. It rather requires a note of exclamation than of interrogation. By the law is the knowledge of sin, and in the presence of divine truth, the Psalmist marvels at the number and heinousness of his sins. He best knows himself who best knows the Word, but even such an one will be in a maze of wonder as to what he does not know, rather than on the mount of congratulation as to what he does know. We have heard of a comedy of errors, but to a good man this is more like a tragedy. Many books have a few lines of errata at the end, but our errata might well be as large as the volume if we could but have sense enough to see them. Augustine wrote in his older days a series of Retractations; ours might make a library if we had enough grace to be convinced of our mistakes and to confess them. "Cleanse thou me from secret faults." Thou canst mark in me faults entirely hidden from myself. It were hopeless to expect to see all my spots; therefore, O Lord, wash away in the atoning blood even those sins which my conscience has been unable to detect. Secret sins, like private conspirators, must be hunted out or they may do deadly mischief; it is well to be much in prayer concerning them. In the Lateran Council of the Church of Rome, a decree was passed that every true believer must confess his sins, all of them, once in a year to the priest, and they affixed to it this declaration, that there is no hope of pardon but in complying with that decree. What can equal the absurdity of such a decree as that? Do they suppose that they can tell their sins as easily as they can count their fingers? Why, if we could receive pardon for all our sins by telling every sin we have committed in one hour, there is not one of us who would be able to enter heaven, since, besides the sins that are known to us and that we may be able to confess, there are a vast mass of sins, which are as truly sins as those which we lament, but which are secret, and like the farmer's small samples which he brings to market, when he has left his granary full at home. We have but a very few sins which we can observe and detect, compared with those which are hidden from ourselves and unseen by our fellow-creatures.

Psalm 19:13

"Keep back thy servant also from presumptuous sins; let them not have dominion over me." - This earnest and humble prayer teaches us that saints may fall into the worst of sins unless restrained by grace, and that therefore they must watch and pray lest they enter into temptation. There is a natural proneness to sin in the best of men, and they must be held back as a horse is held back by the bit or they will run into it. Presumptuous sins are peculiarly dangerous. All sins are great sins, but yet some sins are greater than others. Every sin has in it the very venom of rebellion, and is full of the essential marrow of traitorous rejection of God; but there be some sins which have in them a greater development of the essential mischief of rebellion, and which wear upon their faces more of the brazen pride which defies the Most High. It is wrong to suppose that because all sins will condemn us, that therefore one sin is not greater than another. The fact is, that while all transgression is a greatly grievous and sinful thing, yet there are some transgressions which have a deeper shade of blackness, and a more double scarlet-dyed hue of criminality than others. The presumptuous sins of our text are the chief and worst of all sins; they rank head and foremost in the list of iniquities. It is remarkable that though an atonement was provided under the Jewish law for every kind of sin, there was this one exception: "But the soul that sinneth presumptuously shall have no atonement; it shall be cut off from the midst of my people." And now under the Christian dispensation, although in the sacrifice of our blessed Lord there is a great and precious atonement for presumptuous sins, whereby sinners who have erred in this manner are made clean, yet without doubt, presumptuous sinners, dying without pardon, must expect to receive a double portion of the wrath of God, and a more terrible portion of eternal punishment in the pit that is digged for the wicked. For this reason is David so anxious that he may never come under the reigning power of these giant evils. "Then shall I be upright, and I shall be innocent from the great transgression." He shudders at the thought of the unpardonable sin. Secret sin is a stepping stone to presumptuous sin, and that is the vestibule of "the sin which is unto death." He who is not wilful in his sin, will be in a fair way to be innocent so far as poor sinful man can be; but he who tempts the devil to tempt him is in a path which will lead him from bad to worse, and from the worse to the worst.

Psalm 19:14

"Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O Lord, my strength, and my Redeemer." A sweet prayer, and so spiritual that it is almost as commonly used in Christian worship as the apostolic benediction. Words of the mouth are mockery if the heart does not meditate; the shell is nothing without the kernel; but both together are useless unless accepted; and even if accepted by man, it is all vanity if not acceptable in the sight of God. We must in prayer view Jehovah as our strength enabling, and our Redeemer saving, or we shall not pray aright, and it is well to feel our personal interest so as to use the word my, or our prayers will be hindered. Our near Kinsman's name, our Goel or Redeemer, makes a blessed ending to the Psalm; it began with the heavens, but it ends with him whose glory fills heaven and earth. Blessed Kinsman, give us now to meditate acceptably upon thy most sweet love and tenderness. 12-14. The clearer our view of the law, the more manifest are our sins. Still for its full effect we need divine grace to show us our faults, acquit us, restrain us from the practice, and free us from the power, of sin. Thus only can our conduct be blameless, and our words and thoughts acceptable to God. 19:11-14 God's word warns the wicked not to go on in his wicked way, and warns the righteous not to turn from his good way. There is a reward, not only after keeping, but in keeping God's commandments. Religion makes our comforts sweet, and our crosses easy, life truly valuable, and death itself truly desirable. David not only desired to be pardoned and cleansed from the sins he had discovered and confessed, but from those he had forgotten or overlooked. All discoveries of sin made to us by the law, should drive us to the throne of grace, there to pray. His dependence was the same with that of every Christian who says, Surely in the Lord Jesus have I righteousness and strength. No prayer can be acceptable before God which is not offered in the strength of our Redeemer or Divine Kinsman, through Him who took our nature upon him, that he might redeem us unto God, and restore the long-lost inheritance. May our hearts be much affected with the excellence of the word of God; and much affected with the evil of sin, and the danger we are in of it, and the danger we are in by it.
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