Philippians 3:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Further, my brothers and sisters, rejoice in the Lord! It is no trouble for me to write the same things to you again, and it is a safeguard for you.

New Living Translation
Whatever happens, my dear brothers and sisters, rejoice in the Lord. I never get tired of telling you these things, and I do it to safeguard your faith.

English Standard Version
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you is no trouble to me and is safe for you.

Berean Study Bible
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. It is no trouble for me to write the same things to you again, and it is a safeguard for you.

Berean Literal Bible
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you indeed is not troublesome to me, and is safe for you.

New American Standard Bible
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things again is no trouble to me, and it is a safeguard for you.

King James Bible
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not grievous, but for you it is safe.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write to you again about this is no trouble for me and is a protection for you.

International Standard Version
So then, my brothers, keep on rejoicing in the Lord. It is no trouble for me to write the same things to you; indeed, it is for your safety.

NET Bible
Finally, my brothers and sisters, rejoice in the Lord! To write this again is no trouble to me, and it is a safeguard for you.

New Heart English Bible
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not tiresome, but for you it is safe.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Therefore, my brethren, rejoice in Our Lord; it is not tedious to me as I write these same things to you, because they protect you.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Now then, brothers and sisters, be joyful in the Lord. It's no trouble for me to write the same things to you, and it's for your safety.

New American Standard 1977
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things again is no trouble to me, and it is a safeguard for you.

Jubilee Bible 2000
It remains, my brethren, that ye rejoice in the Lord. It does not bother me to write the same things to you, and for you it is safe.

King James 2000 Bible
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not troublesome, but for you it is safe.

American King James Version
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not grievous, but for you it is safe.

American Standard Version
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not irksome, but for you it is safe.

Douay-Rheims Bible
As to the rest, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not wearisome, but to you it is necessary.

Darby Bible Translation
For the rest, my brethren, rejoice in [the] Lord: to write the same things to you, to me [is] not irksome, and for you safe.

English Revised Version
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not irksome, but for you it is safe.

Webster's Bible Translation
Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not grievous, but for you it is safe.

Weymouth New Testament
In conclusion, my brethren, be joyful in the Lord. For me to give you the same warnings as before is not irksome to me, while so far as you are concerned it is a safe precaution.

World English Bible
Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not tiresome, but for you it is safe.

Young's Literal Translation
As to the rest, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord; the same things to write to you to me indeed is not tiresome, and for you is sure;
Study Bible
Righteousness through Faith
1Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. It is no trouble for me to write the same things to you again, and it is a safeguard for you. 2Watch out for those dogs, those workers of evil, those mutilators of the flesh!…
Cross References
Psalm 33:1
Sing for joy in the LORD, O you righteous ones; Praise is becoming to the upright.

Philippians 2:18
So you too should be glad and rejoice with me.

Philippians 4:4
Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!

2 Peter 1:12
Therefore, I will always remind you of these things, even though you know them and are established in the truth you now have.
Treasury of Scripture

Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not grievous, but for you it is safe.

Finally.

Philippians 4:8 Finally, brothers, whatever things are true, whatever things are …

2 Corinthians 13:11 Finally, brothers, farewell. Be perfect, be of good comfort, be of …

Ephesians 6:10 Finally, my brothers, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might.

1 Thessalonians 4:1 Furthermore then we beseech you, brothers, and exhort you by the Lord Jesus…

1 Peter 3:8 Finally, be you all of one mind, having compassion one of another, …

rejoice.

Philippians 3:3 For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and …

Philippians 4:4 Rejoice in the Lord always: and again I say, Rejoice.

Deuteronomy 12:18 But you must eat them before the LORD your God in the place which …

Deuteronomy 16:11 And you shall rejoice before the LORD your God, you, and your son, …

1 Samuel 2:1 And Hannah prayed, and said, My heart rejoices in the LORD, my horn …

1 Chronicles 15:28 Thus all Israel brought up the ark of the covenant of the LORD with …

1 Chronicles 16:10,31-33 Glory you in his holy name: let the heart of them rejoice that seek the LORD…

1 Chronicles 29:22 And did eat and drink before the LORD on that day with great gladness. …

2 Chronicles 30:26,27 So there was great joy in Jerusalem: for since the time of Solomon …

Nehemiah 8:10 Then he said to them, Go your way, eat the fat, and drink the sweet, …

Job 22:26 For then shall you have your delight in the Almighty, and shall lift …

Psalm 5:11 But let all those that put their trust in you rejoice: let them ever …

Psalm 32:11 Be glad in the LORD, and rejoice, you righteous: and shout for joy, …

Psalm 33:1 Rejoice in the LORD, O you righteous: for praise is comely for the upright.

Psalm 37:4 Delight yourself also in the LORD: and he shall give you the desires …

Psalm 42:4 When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had …

Psalm 97:1 The LORD reigns; let the earth rejoice; let the multitude of isles …

Psalm 100:1,2 Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all you lands…

Psalm 149:2 Let Israel rejoice in him that made him: let the children of Zion …

Isaiah 12:2,3 Behold, God is my salvation; I will trust, and not be afraid: for …

Isaiah 41:16 You shall fan them, and the wind shall carry them away, and the whirlwind …

Isaiah 61:10 I will greatly rejoice in the LORD, my soul shall be joyful in my …

Isaiah 65:14 Behold, my servants shall sing for joy of heart, but you shall cry …

Isaiah 66:11,12 That you may suck, and be satisfied with the breasts of her consolations; …

Joel 2:23 Be glad then, you children of Zion, and rejoice in the LORD your …

Habakkuk 3:17,18 Although the fig tree shall not blossom, neither shall fruit be in …

Zephaniah 3:14,17 Sing, O daughter of Zion; shout, O Israel; be glad and rejoice with …

Zechariah 10:7 And they of Ephraim shall be like a mighty man, and their heart shall …

Matthew 5:12 Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: …

Luke 1:47 And my spirit has rejoiced in God my Savior.

Romans 5:2,3,11 By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, …

1 Thessalonians 5:16 Rejoice ever more.

James 1:2 My brothers, count it all joy when you fall into divers temptations;

1 Peter 1:6-8 Wherein you greatly rejoice, though now for a season, if need be, …

1 Peter 4:13 But rejoice, inasmuch as you are partakers of Christ's sufferings; …

To write.

Philippians 2:17,18 Yes, and if I be offered on the sacrifice and service of your faith, …

2 Peter 1:12-15 Why I will not be negligent to put you always in remembrance of these …

2 Peter 3:1 This second letter, beloved, I now write to you; in both which I …

III.

[6.Original Conclusion of the Epistle (Philippians 3:1).

"FINALLY BRETHREN, FAREWELL IN THE LORD."]

(1) Finally.--The same word is used in 2Corinthians 13:11; Ephesians 6:10; 2Thessalonians 3:1 (as also in this Epistle, Philippians 4:8), to usher in the conclusion. Here, on the contrary, it stands nearly in the middle of the Epistle. Moreover, the commendation above of Timothy and Epaphroditus is exactly that which, according to St. Paul's custom, would mark the final sentences of the whole. Again, the words "rejoice in the Lord" may, according to the common usage of the time (although certainly that usage is not adopted in other Letters of St. Paul), not improbably signify farewell in the Lord; and even if not used in this formal and conventional sense, yet certainly hold the position of final good wishes, which that sense implies. The resumption of them in Philippians 4:4, where the actual conclusion now begins, is striking. It seems, therefore, highly probable, that in this place the Letter was originally drawing to an end, and that some news was at that moment brought which induced the Apostle to add a second part, couched in language of equal affection, but of greater anxiety and more emphatic warning. Of such a break, and resumption with a far more complete change of style, we have a notable instance at the beginning of the tenth chapter of the Second Epistle to the Corinthians; as also of the addition of postscript after postscript in the last chapter of the Epistle to the Romans.

[7.Words of Warning (Philippians 3:1 to Philippians 4:3).

(1) AGAINST THE JUDAISERS.

(a)Warning against confidence "in the flesh," illustrated by his own renunciation of all Jewish privileges and hopes, in order to have "the righteousness of Christ" (Philippians 3:1-9).

(b)Warning against confidence in perfection as already attained, again illustrated by his own sense of imperfection and hope of continual progress (Philippians 3:10-16).

(2) AGAINST THE ANTINOMIAN PARTY.

Contrast of the sensual and corrupt life of the flesh with the spirituality and hope of future perfection which become citizens of heaven (Philippians 3:17-21).

(3) AGAINST ALL TENDENCY TO SCHISM (Philippians 4:1-3).

To write the same things to you.--These words may refer to what goes before, in which case the reference must be to "rejoice in the Lord." Now, it is true that this is the burden of the Epistle; but this interpretation suits ill the following words, "for you it is safe," which obviously refer to some warning against danger or temptation. Hence it is far better to refer them to the abrupt and incisive warnings that follow.

These, then, are said to be a repetition; but of what? Hardly of the former part of this Epistle, for it is difficult there to find anything corresponding to them. If not, then it must be of St. Paul's previous teaching, by word or by letter. For the use here of the word "to write," though it suits better the idea of former communication by writing, cannot exclude oral teaching. That there was more than one Epistle to Philippi has been inferred (probably, but not certainly) from an expression in Polycarp's letter to the Philippians (sect. 3), speaking of "the Epistles" of St. Paul to them. It is not in itself unlikely that another Epistle should have been written; nor have we any right to argue decisively against it, on the ground that no such Epistle is found in the canon of Scripture. But however this may be, it seems natural to refer to St. Paul's former teaching as a whole. Now, when St. Paul first preached at Philippi, he had not long before carried to Antioch the decree of the council against the contention of "them of the circumcision;" and, as it was addressed to the churches "of Syria and Cilicia," he can hardly have failed to communicate it, when he passed through both regions "confirming the churches" (Acts 15:41). At Thessalonica, not long after, the jealousy of the Jews at his preaching the freedom of the gospel drove him from the city (Acts 17:5). When he came to Macedonia on his next journey, the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, written there and probably at Philippi, marks the first outburst of the Judaising controversy; and when he returned to Philippi, on his way back, he had just written the Epistles to the Galatians and Romans, which deal exhaustively with the whole question. Nothing is more likely than that his teaching at Philippi had largely dealt with the warning against the Judaisers. What, then, more natural than to introduce a new warning on the subject--shown to be necessary by news received--with the courteous half-apology, "To write the same things to you, to me is not grievous (or, tedious) but for you it is safe," making assurance doubly sure?

Verse 1. - Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord. This word "finally" (τὸ λοιπόν is frequently used by St. Paul to introduce a practical conclusion after the doctrinal portion of his Epistles: thus it occurs again in Philippians 4:8, and also in 2 Corinthians 13:11; Ephesians 6:10; 1 Thessalonians 4:1; 2 Thessalonians 2:1. Some render χαίρετε "farewell;" but "rejoice" seems more suitable here. The golden thread of spiritual joy runs through this Epistle. "Rejoice in the Lord" is the oft-repeated refrain of St. Paul's solemn hymn of praise. To write the same things to you, to me indeed is not grievous, but for you it is safe. "The same things:" does he refer to his oral instructions, to a previous Epistle now lost, to his exhortations to unity, or to his reiterated command "Rejoice"? The words seem most naturally to point to something in the same Epistle rather than to advice given on former occasions. It is true that Polycarp, in his letter to the Philippiaus (section 3), says that St. Paul wrote Epistles (ἐπιστολάς) to them; but there is no trace of any other Epistle; and the mere plural number is not sufficient to support the theory of other letters, the plural word being frequently used of a single letter. Bishop Lightfoot suggests the exhortation to unity in Philippians 2:2. But this topic does not reappear before Philippians 4:2. And the hypothesis of an interruption, which (as Bishop Lightfoot and others think) suddenly turned the apostle's thoughts into another channel and prevented him from explaining τὰ αὐτά (the same things) till Philippians 4:2, seems forced and unnecessary, notwithstanding the great authority by which it is supported. It seems more probable (Bengel and others) that St. Paul refers to the constant admonition of this Epistle, "Rejoice in the Lord." To repeat this again and again was to him not grievous (rather, with R.V., "irksome"), but safe for the Philippians. Christian joy has a close connection with safety, for it implies unswerving faith, and, more than that, the presence of Christ. Compare the oft-repeated exhortation of Psalm 37, "Fret not thyself: it tends only to evil-doing" (ver. 8, in the Hebrew). Possibly, however, ἀσφαλές here, as in Acts 22:30 and. 25:26, may mean "certain." The repetition is not irksome to St. Paul, while it makes his meaning and his wishes certain to the Philippians. Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord,.... The Syriac version reads, "in our Lord", i.e. Christ. The apostle seems as if he was about to conclude his epistle; and therefore, as if he was taking his farewell of this church, and giving his last advice to them, he exhorts them in a most affectionate manner, as his dear brethren in a spiritual relation, that they would make Christ their chief joy; that whatever sorrow they might have on account of his bonds, or the sickness of Epaphroditus, yet, he observes they had reason to rejoice in their Lord and Saviour; and however, it might be matter of rejoicing to them to hear of his hope of coming once more to them, and of the recovery of their minister and his return to them, yet Christ should be the principal object of their joy. A believer has always reason to rejoice in Christ; in the greatness of his person, he being in the form of God, and equal to him, and therefore able to save his to the uttermost by his obedience and death, and has interest enough in heaven to make his intercession prevalent and successful and power to keep safe all that are committed to him; and in the fitness of his person to be a Mediator, and daysman, to take care of things pertaining to the glory of God, and to make reconciliation for sin; and in the fulness of his person, he having all grace in him for his people, which is all theirs, and with joy may they draw water out of the full wells of salvation in him; and in the beauty of his person which surpasses all others, a sight of which fills with joy unspeakable, and full of glory. They may, and should rejoice, as they sometimes do, in his salvation; in the contrivance of it by infinite wisdom; in the impetration of it by himself; and in the application of it by his spirit; and that because hereby justice is satisfied, the law is magnified and made honourable, sin is finished, and an everlasting righteousness brought in. Also they are called upon to rejoice in his resurrection, which is for their justification; in his ascension, seeing he then received gifts for men; and in his session at the right hand of God, which is in their nature; and in his intercession which is to their advantage; and in all the relations he stands in to them, as head, husband, father, brother, friend; and in everything that is his, and that belongs unto him, as his Gospel, ordinances, ways, and worship,

To write the same things to you. The apostle finding he had more time on his hands, or fresh thoughts occurred to him, writes on, and makes an apology for writing the same things, which he had either wrote to other churches, or which he had delivered when first among them, or which he had since wrote to them. For sometimes it is necessary to say and write the same things over and over again, partly that they may be the better understood, and partly that they may be more strongly fixed in the memory; as also, that the saints may be the more established in the present truth: and which he says,

to me indeed is not grievous; or troublesome; he found no backwardness to it, nor sluggishness in it; he was not loath to do it, nor was it wearisome to him; or made him slothful, as the Arabic renders it; nor was he afraid to repeat what he had wrote, or again to warn them against false teachers, of whom he stood in no fear:

but for you it is safe; or "necessary", as the Vulgate Latin version reads, being a means of preserving them from the error of the wicked; for though the saints are safe in Christ, and can never finally and totally be deceived, yet the Gospel, and the frequent ministration of it, are a means of keeping them from the deception of evil men; for as the Syriac version renders it, "they make you more cautious"; when truth is repeated, and afresh confirmed, it guards against falling in with damnable heresies. And so the Arabic version renders it, "is a guard", or "garrison to you". CHAPTER 3

Php 3:1-21. Warning against Judaizers: He Has Greater Cause than They to Trust in Legal Righteousness, but Renounced It for Christ's Righteousness, in Which He Presses after Perfection: Warning against Carnal Persons: Contrast of the Believer's Life and Hope.

1. Finally—rather, not with the notion of time, but making a transition to another general subject, "Furthermore" [Bengel and Wahl] as in 1Th 4:1. Literally, "As to what remains," etc. It is often used at the conclusion of Epistles for "finally" (Eph 6:10; 2Th 3:1). But it is not restricted to this meaning, as Alford thinks, supposing that Paul used it here intending to close his Epistle, but was led by the mention of the Judaizers into a more lengthened dissertation.

the same things—concerning "rejoicing," the prevailing feature in this Epistle (Php 1:18, 25; 2:17; 4:4, where, compare the "again I say," with "the same things" here).

In the Lord—marks the true ground of joy, in contrast with "having confidence in the flesh," or in any outward sensible matter of boasting (Php 3:3).

not grievous—"not irksome."

for you it is safe—Spiritual joy is the best safety against error (Php 3:2; Ne 8:10, end).3:1-11 Sincere Christians rejoice in Christ Jesus. The prophet calls the false prophets dumb dogs, Isa 56:10; to which the apostle seems to refer. Dogs, for their malice against faithful professors of the gospel of Christ, barking at them and biting them. They urged human works in opposition to the faith of Christ; but Paul calls them evil-workers. He calls them the concision; as they rent the church of Christ, and cut it to pieces. The work of religion is to no purpose, unless the heart is in it, and we must worship God in the strength and grace of the Divine Spirit. They rejoice in Christ Jesus, not in mere outward enjoyments and performances. Nor can we too earnestly guard against those who oppose or abuse the doctrine of free salvation. If the apostle would have gloried and trusted in the flesh, he had as much cause as any man. But the things which he counted gain while a Pharisee, and had reckoned up, those he counted loss for Christ. The apostle did not persuade them to do any thing but what he himself did; or to venture on any thing but that on which he himself ventured his never-dying soul. He deemed all these things to be but loss, compared with the knowledge of Christ, by faith in his person and salvation. He speaks of all worldly enjoyments and outward privileges which sought a place with Christ in his heart, or could pretend to any merit and desert, and counted them but loss; but it might be said, It is easy to say so; but what would he do when he came to the trial? He had suffered the loss of all for the privileges of a Christian. Nay, he not only counted them loss, but the vilest refuse, offals thrown to dogs; not only less valuable than Christ, but in the highest degree contemptible, when set up as against him. True knowledge of Christ alters and changes men, their judgments and manners, and makes them as if made again anew. The believer prefers Christ, knowing that it is better for us to be without all worldly riches, than without Christ and his word. Let us see what the apostle resolved to cleave to, and that was Christ and heaven. We are undone, without righteousness wherein to appear before God, for we are guilty. There is a righteousness provided for us in Jesus Christ, and it is a complete and perfect righteousness. None can have benefit by it, who trust in themselves. Faith is the appointed means of applying the saving benefit. It is by faith in Christ's blood. We are made conformable to Christ's death, when we die to sin, as he died for sin; and the world is crucified to us, and we to the world, by the cross of Christ. The apostle was willing to do or to suffer any thing, to attain the glorious resurrection of saints. This hope and prospect carried him through all difficulties in his work. He did not hope to attain it through his own merit and righteousness, but through the merit and righteousness of Jesus Christ.
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