John 11:6
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
So when he heard that Lazarus was sick, he stayed where he was two more days,

New Living Translation
he stayed where he was for the next two days.

English Standard Version
So, when he heard that Lazarus was ill, he stayed two days longer in the place where he was.

Berean Study Bible
Yet when He heard that Lazarus was sick, He stayed where He was for two days.

Berean Literal Bible
Therefore when He heard that he is sick, then indeed He remained two days in the place in which He was.

New American Standard Bible
So when He heard that he was sick, He then stayed two days longer in the place where He was.

King James Bible
When he had heard therefore that he was sick, he abode two days still in the same place where he was.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
So when He heard that he was sick, He stayed two more days in the place where He was.

International Standard Version
Yet, when he heard that Lazarus was ill, he stayed where he was for two more days.

NET Bible
So when he heard that Lazarus was sick, he remained in the place where he was for two more days.

New Heart English Bible
When therefore he heard that he was sick, he stayed two days in the place where he was.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And after he heard that he was sick, he remained in the place where he was for two days.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Yet, when Jesus heard that Lazarus was sick, he stayed where he was for two more days.

New American Standard 1977
When therefore He heard that he was sick, He stayed then two days longer in the place where He was.

Jubilee Bible 2000
When he had heard therefore that he was sick, he abode two days still in the same place where he was.

King James 2000 Bible
When he had heard therefore that he was sick, he abode two days still in the same place where he was.

American King James Version
When he had heard therefore that he was sick, he stayed two days still in the same place where he was.

American Standard Version
When therefore he heard that he was sick, he abode at that time two days in the place where he was.

Douay-Rheims Bible
When he had heard therefore that he was sick, he still remained in the same place two days.

Darby Bible Translation
When therefore he heard, He is sick, he remained two days then in the place where he was.

English Revised Version
When therefore he heard that he was sick, he abode at that time two days in the place where he was.

Webster's Bible Translation
When therefore he had heard that he was sick, he abode two days still in the same place where he was.

Weymouth New Testament
When, however, He heard that Lazarus was ill, He still remained two days in that same place.

World English Bible
When therefore he heard that he was sick, he stayed two days in the place where he was.

Young's Literal Translation
when, therefore, he heard that he is ailing, then indeed he remained in the place in which he was two days,
(6) When he had heard therefore.--Better, When He heard therefore . . .

He abode two days still.--It is usual to explain this delay as caused by His wish to test the faith of the sisters, or by the nature of the work which He was then doing, and was unwilling to leave. But the first reason passes over the fact that their faith had been shown in their message to Him; and the second postulates His presence at Bethany as necessary for the restoration of Lazarus. (Comp. John 4:49-50.) A juster view is that which remembers the principle which He had taught at the first miracle (John 2:4), that the hours of His work were marked out by signs that He alone could read, but that every hour had its work, and every work its hour. (Comp. John 11:4; John 11:9, and John 9:3-4.)

A comparison with John 11:11 makes it certain that Lazarus was dead before they set out for Juda, but he was living when the words of John 11:4 were spoken. The fact of death may have determined the hour of their departure.

Verses 6, 7. - The τότε μὲν of ver. 6 implies an understood δὲ in ver. 7, and the whole passage will be as follows: Now Jesus loved deeply Martha, and her sister, and Lazarus; when therefore he heard that he (Lazarus) was sick, he remained, it is true, τότε μὲν two days in the place where he was, but then ἔπειτα (δὲ) after this (and because he loved) he saith to his disciples, Let us go again into Judaea. He did not remain because he loved, but, though he remained, and because he loved, he said, "Let us," etc. So that we do not see here any intention on his part, by remaining, to test their love (Olshausen), nor to exaggerate the effect of the miracle by raising a dead man from his grave rather than from his death-bed or his bier. It is not difficult to gather from the sequel that when the message reached Jesus Lazarus was dead and buried. We find that when our Lord returned to Bethany four days had elapsed since the death of Lazarus, and the four days must be calculated thus: First one long day's journey from Peraea to Bethany, a distance of eight or nine leagues. If the messenger of the sisters had taken equal time to reach Jesus in Perked, or even a longer period, as time might easily be consumed in the effort to find our Lord in the mountains of Moab; then the two days of his waiting after receiving the message would, with those occupied by the double journey, make up the four that had passed when Jesus reached the grave. Lucke, Neander, Godet, and Westcott think that our Lord remained in Peraea because there was work in which he was engaged and could not relinquish. Meyer, Moulton, and Weiss, that he waited for some especial communication from his Father, for some revelation of moral necessity and heavenly inspiration, like those which dictated all his other movements. B. Weiss: "It was a sacrifice to his calling, of his heart's most ardent desires, that he remained quietly two days in the same place." "We see," says Edersheim, "Christ once more asleep while the disciples are despairing, swamped in the storm! Christ never in haste, because always sure." The silences of Scripture and the waitings of God are often without explanation. The event proves that deep purpose presided over them. The "let us go," etc., implies a lofty courage, a sense of coming crisis. Love conquers fear and peril for himself and his followers. "Judaea" is mentioned rather than Bethany for the same reason. The "again" points forcibly back to the last visit, when he told both friends and foes that the good Shepherd would snatch his sheep from the jaws of death, even though he lay down his own life in the doing of it. When he had heard therefore that he was sick,.... Though Christ had heard that Lazarus was sick, and by such good hands, a message being sent him by his sisters, to acquaint him with it; and though he had such a very great love for him, and the whole family, yet he did not go directly to him, and to his assistance:

but he abode two days still in the same place where he was; at Bethabara, beyond Jordan; this he did to try the faith and patience of the sisters of Lazarus, and that the miracle of raising him from the dead might be the more manifest, and his own glory might be the more illustrious, and yet equal, if not greater tenderness and love be shown to his friends. 6. When he heard he was sick, he abode two days still … where he was—at least twenty-five miles off. Beyond all doubt this was just to let things come to their worst, in order to display His glory. But how trying, meantime, to the faith of his friends, and how unlike the way in which love to a dying friend usually shows itself, on which it is plain that Mary reckoned. But the ways of divine are not as the ways of human love. Often they are the reverse. When His people are sick, in body or spirit; when their case is waxing more and more desperate every day; when all hope of recovery is about to expire—just then and therefore it is that "He abides two days still in the same place where He is." Can they still hope against hope? Often they do not; but "this is their infirmity." For it is His chosen style of acting. We have been well taught it, and should not now have the lesson to learn. From the days of Moses was it given sublimely forth as the character of His grandest interpositions, that "the Lord will judge His people and repent Himself for His servants"—when He seeth that their power is gone (De 32:36).11:1-6 It is no new thing for those whom Christ loves, to be sick; bodily distempers correct the corruption, and try the graces of God's people. He came not to preserve his people from these afflictions, but to save them from their sins, and from the wrath to come; however, it behoves us to apply to Him in behalf of our friends and relatives when sick and afflicted. Let this reconcile us to the darkest dealings of Providence, that they are all for the glory of God: sickness, loss, disappointment, are so; and if God be glorified, we ought to be satisfied. Jesus loved Martha, and her sister, and Lazarus. The families are greatly favoured in which love and peace abound; but those are most happy whom Jesus loves, and by whom he is beloved. Alas, that this should seldom be the case with every person, even in small families. God has gracious intentions, even when he seems to delay. When the work of deliverance, temporal or spiritual, public or personal, is delayed, it does but stay for the right time.
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