2 Samuel 8:13
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
And David became famous after he returned from striking down eighteen thousand Edomites in the Valley of Salt.

New Living Translation
So David became even more famous when he returned from destroying 18,000 Edomites in the Valley of Salt.

English Standard Version
And David made a name for himself when he returned from striking down 18,000 Edomites in the Valley of Salt.

New American Standard Bible
So David made a name for himself when he returned from killing 18,000 Arameans in the Valley of Salt.

King James Bible
And David gat him a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of salt, being eighteen thousand men.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
David made a reputation for himself when he returned from striking down 18,000 Edomites in the Valley of Salt.

International Standard Version
David made a name for himself when he returned from killing 18,000 Edomites in the Salt Valley.

NET Bible
David became famous when he returned from defeating the Arameans in the Valley of Salt, he defeated 18,000 in all.

New Heart English Bible
David earned a reputation when he returned from smiting the Edomites in the Valley of Salt, even eighteen thousand men.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
David made a name for himself by killing 18,000 Edomites in the Dead Sea region as he returned [to Jerusalem].

JPS Tanakh 1917
And David got him a name when he returned from smiting the Arameans in the Valley of Salt, even eighteen thousand men.

New American Standard 1977
So David made a name for himself when he returned from killing 18,000 Arameans in the Valley of Salt.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And David received fame when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of salt eighteen thousand men.

King James 2000 Bible
And David got him a name when he returned from defeating of the Edomites in the valley of salt, being eighteen thousand men.

American King James Version
And David got him a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of salt, being eighteen thousand men.

American Standard Version
And David gat him a name when he returned from smiting the Syrians in the Valley of Salt, even eighteen thousand men.

Douay-Rheims Bible
David also made himself a name, when he returned after taking Syria in the valley of the saltpits, killing eighteen thousand:

Darby Bible Translation
And David made him a name when he returned, after he had smitten the Syrians in the valley of salt, eighteen thousand [men].

English Revised Version
And David gat him a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the Valley of Salt, even eighteen thousand men.

Webster's Bible Translation
And David made him a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of Salt, being eighteen thousand men.

World English Bible
David earned a reputation when he returned from smiting the Syrians in the Valley of Salt, even eighteen thousand men.

Young's Literal Translation
And David maketh a name in his turning back from his smiting Aram in the valley of Salt -- eighteen thousand;
Study Bible
David's Triumphs
12from Aram and Moab and the sons of Ammon and the Philistines and Amalek, and from the spoil of Hadadezer, son of Rehob, king of Zobah. 13So David made a name for himself when he returned from killing 18000 Arameans in the Valley of Salt. 14He put garrisons in Edom. In all Edom he put garrisons, and all the Edomites became servants to David. And the LORD helped David wherever he went.…
Cross References
Genesis 11:4
They said, "Come, let us build for ourselves a city, and a tower whose top will reach into heaven, and let us make for ourselves a name, otherwise we will be scattered abroad over the face of the whole earth."

2 Samuel 7:9
"I have been with you wherever you have gone and have cut off all your enemies from before you; and I will make you a great name, like the names of the great men who are on the earth.

2 Kings 14:7
He killed of Edom in the Valley of Salt 10,000 and took Sela by war, and named it Joktheel to this day.
Treasury of Scripture

And David got him a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of salt, being eighteen thousand men.

gat him

2 Samuel 7:9 And I was with you wherever you went, and have cut off all your enemies …

1 Chronicles 18:12 Moreover Abishai the son of Zeruiah slew of the Edomites in the valley …

Psalm 60:1 O God, you have cast us off, you have scattered us, you have been …

smiting [heb] his smiting
the valley of salt

2 Kings 14:7 He slew of Edom in the valley of salt ten thousand, and took Selah …

2 Chronicles 25:11 And Amaziah strengthened himself, and led forth his people, and went …

being. or, slaying

(13) When he returned from smiting of the Syrians.--Possibly, from the similarity in the original between Syria and Edom (see 2Samuel 8:3; 2Samuel 8:12), the words "he smote Edom" have dropped out of the text, but this supposition is not necessary. The course of affairs appears to have been as follows:--the war was originally undertaken against the Ammonites (2Samuel 10:1-12), who had obtained the aid of the Syrians. In the first campaign their combined armies were defeated (2Samuel 10:13-14), and they sought aid from every quarter, from the tribes beyond the Euphrates, on the north (2Samuel 10:16), and from the Edomites on the south. David first inflicted a crushing defeat upon the allies near Hamath, and then "returned" to the south, where he again met them in "the valley of salt"--the Arabalt south of the Dead Sea, this latter army being naturally chiefly composed of Edomites, and so called in 1Chronicles 18:12, and in the title of Psalms 60, but here spoken of as Syrians because the whole confederacy is called by the name of its most powerful member. David himself returned from the southern campaign; but what was done by his general, Abishai, under his orders, is naturally said to have been done by him. Meantime, when this first battle, attended with the slaughter of 18,000 men, had been won by Abishai, Joab, the general-in-chief, being set free by the victories in the north, gained another battle in the same locality, killing 12,000 (Psalms 60, title). The power of Edom was now completely broken, and the whole forces of Israel were mustered under Joab to overrun their country and destroy all its male inhabitants (1Kings 11:15-16), certain of them, however, excepted (1Kings 11:17), and their descendants in after ages were relentless foes of Israel. (Comp. the prophecy of Isaac, Genesis 27:40.)

In this summary of David's reign the historian here turns from his wars and victories over other nations to the internal affairs of his kingdom. Substantially the same list of officers is again given in 2Samuel 20:23-26.

Verse 13. - From smiting of the Syrians; Hebrew, of Aram. Here "Edom" is certainly right (see 1 Chronicles 18:12), unless we accept Keil's conjecture, and suppose that "he smote Edom" has dropped out of the text, and must be inserted. In the superscription of Psalm we find the wars with Aram-Naharaim (Mesopotamia) and Aram-Zobah coupled with this smiting of Edom in the valley of salt, which lay to the south of the Dead Sea, and was a fatal place to the Edomitos in their war subsequently with Amaziah (2 Kings 14:7). Such a double victory over the Arameans first, and immediately afterwards over Edom, would account for the "name," that is, the reputation, which David gained. The course of events seems to have been as follows. The Edomites, believing that David was engaged in a struggle beyond his powers with the Syrians, took the opportunity to invade Israel. But the campaign in Aram was quickly decided, and David was able to send Abishai with a detachment of his forces to repel the Edomites. On hearing of his approach, they retired before him, and, making a stand in their own territories, were defeated in the valley of salt, with the loss of eighteen thousand men (1 Chronicles 18:12). In this place the victory is ascribed to David, because it was won by his general acting under his orders. For some unexplained reason, the feelings of the Israelites against Edom were very vindictive, and Joab followed with larger forces, and not only slew twelve thousand in a second battle (Psalm 60, title), but remained six months in the country, ruthlessly putting every male to death (1 Kings 11:15, 16). From this time the Edomites and Israelites were implacable foes, and in later Jewish literature the Jews gave vent to their intense hatred of the Roman empire by giving it the name of Edom. And David gat him a name,.... Fame and reputation in the several nations of the world for valour and courage, for the many and signal victories that he obtained; the Jewish writers generally refer this to his humanity in burying the dead bodies of his enemies slain in war, which gained him great esteem among all, and even his very enemies; but nothing of that kind is pointed at here, but his conquests: or "he made himself a name"; erected a triumphal arch (b) in memory of his victories:

when he returned from smiting of the Syrians in the valley of salt,

being eighteen thousand men; in the relation of this fact in different places some difficulties arise, both as to the people smitten, and their numbers, and by whom; in this place they are said to be Syrians, but in 1 Chronicles 18:12, and in the title of Psalm 60:1, which was composed on account of these victories, they are called Edomites, and said to be of Edom; which may be reconciled by observing, that the Syrians and Edomites were confederates in this war; and that whereas the latter were auxiliaries to the former, the whole body of the army might be called Syrians, of which twenty two thousand were slain that were properly Syrians, and eighteen thousand Edomites, in all forty thousand; which was a very great slaughter: or the sense is, that when he had smitten the twenty two thousand Syrians, and was upon the return, he met with a body of Edomites, who came to the assistance of the Syrians, and he slew eighteen thousand of them; and the Jews say, as Jarchi observes, there were two battles; and if so, this would remove all the difficulties started; as for the numbers slain, here eighteen thousand, and Psalm 60:1, twelve thousand, it is reconciled by observing, that Abishai first began the attack upon the Edomites, and slew six thousand of them; and then Joab fell upon them, and slew twelve thousand more, in all eighteen thousand; in 1 Chronicles 18:12, this slaughter is ascribed to Abishai, because he began it, even the whole number; and in Psalm 60:1, to Joab, the twelve thousand slain by him, who seconded Abishai; and the whole is here attributed to David, because he was king, under whom Abishai and Joab served as generals: and no less difficult is it to ascertain the place where this slaughter was made, called "the valley of salt": it seems by our text that it was in Syria, but in other places as if it was in Edom; see 2 Kings 14:7; but in Edom itself is no such valley to be found, though there is in Syria; one traveller (c) tells us, that in the way from Aleppo to the banks of Euphrates are many villages, among which is one of note, called Tedith, famous for a synod held here by the Jews, in the year from the creation 3498, of which Ezra was the scribe; when were placed the books of the Old Testament in the order in which they now are; and near this town, he says, is the valley of salt, memorable for the victory here recorded: others say (d) about three or four hours' journey from Aleppo is the valley of salt, near which is a salt spring, whose waters running over the place leave, when dried by the sun, a great quantity of excellent salt; this salt is thrown together in the Gabboul, or salt house; but by others (e) we are informed, that near about an hour's distance from the city of Tadmor, see 1 Kings 9:18 2 Chronicles 8:3, is to be seen a large valley of salt, affording great quantities thereof; and it is thought that this is more probably the valley of salt mentioned here, than another which lies about four hours from Aleppo, and has sometimes passed for it; and which the above accounts show: but a modern writer (f), in his account of Palmyra, the same with Tadmor, speaks of a great plain, all covered with salt, from whence the whole country round is supplied. This plain is about a league from Palmyra, and extends itself towards the eastern part of Idumea (or Edom) the capital city of which was Bozra; and indeed this valley being both in Syria, and reaching to the borders of Edom, bids fair to be the valley here spoken of.

(b) So Hieron. Trad. Heb. in 2 Reg. fol. 78. D. (c) Cartwright's Preacher's Travels, p. 11. (d) Egmont and Heyman's Travels, vol. 2. p. 347. (e) See Lowthorp's Philosophical Transactions abridged, vol. 3. p. 504. (f) Halifax apud Calmet's Dictionary in the Word "Salt". 13. David gat him a name when he returned from smiting of the Syrians—Instead of Syrians, the Septuagint version reads "Edomites," which is the true reading, as is evident from 2Sa 8:14. This conquest, made by the army of David, was due to the skilful generalship and gallantry of Abishai and Joab. (1Ch 18:12; compare Ps 60:1, title.) The valley was the ravine of salt (the Ghor), adjoining the Salt Mountain, at the southwestern extremity of the Dead Sea, separating the ancient territories of Judah and Edom [Robinson].8:9-14 All the precious things David was master of, were dedicated things; they were designed for building the temple. The idols of gold David destroyed, 2Sa 5:21, but the vessels of gold he dedicated. Thus, in the conquest of a soul by the grace of the Son of David, what stands in opposition to God must be destroyed, every lust must be mortified and crucified, but what may glorify him must be dedicated; thus the property of it is altered. God employs his servants in various ways; some, as David, in spiritual battles; others, as Solomon, in spiritual buildings; and one prepares work for the other, that God may have the glory of all.
Jump to Previous
Aram Arameans David Destruction Edom Edomites E'domites Eighteen Famous Gat Great Honour Killing Maketh Salt Slew Smiting Smitten Striking Syrians Thousand Turning Valley Won
Jump to Next
Aram Arameans David Destruction Edom Edomites E'domites Eighteen Famous Gat Great Honour Killing Maketh Salt Slew Smiting Smitten Striking Syrians Thousand Turning Valley Won
Links
2 Samuel 8:13 NIV
2 Samuel 8:13 NLT
2 Samuel 8:13 ESV
2 Samuel 8:13 NASB
2 Samuel 8:13 KJV

2 Samuel 8:13 Biblia Paralela
2 Samuel 8:13 Chinese Bible
2 Samuel 8:13 French Bible
2 Samuel 8:13 German Bible

Alphabetical: a after And Arameans became David down Edomites eighteen famous for from he himself in killing made name of returned Salt So striking the thousand Valley when

OT History: 2 Samuel 8:13 David got him a name when he (2Sa iiSam 2 Sam ii sam) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
2 Samuel 8:12
Top of Page
Top of Page