Job 18:4
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New International Version
You who tear yourself to pieces in your anger, is the earth to be abandoned for your sake? Or must the rocks be moved from their place?

New Living Translation
You may tear out your hair in anger, but will that destroy the earth? Will it make the rocks tremble?

English Standard Version
You who tear yourself in your anger, shall the earth be forsaken for you, or the rock be removed out of its place?

Berean Study Bible
You who tear yourself in anger—should the earth be forsaken on your account, or the rocks be moved from their place?

New American Standard Bible
"O you who tear yourself in your anger-- For your sake is the earth to be abandoned, Or the rock to be moved from its place?

King James Bible
He teareth himself in his anger: shall the earth be forsaken for thee? and shall the rock be removed out of his place?

Christian Standard Bible
You who tear yourself in anger--should the earth be abandoned on your account, or a rock be removed from its place?

Contemporary English Version
You cut yourself in anger. Will that shake the earth or even move the rocks? *

Good News Translation
You are only hurting yourself with your anger. Will the earth be deserted because you are angry? Will God move mountains to satisfy you?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
You who tear yourself in anger-- should the earth be abandoned on your account, or a rock be removed from its place?

International Standard Version
You're tearing yourself to pieces in your anger. Will the land be abandoned because of you, or the rock be moved from its place?"

NET Bible
You who tear yourself to pieces in your anger, will the earth be abandoned for your sake? Or will a rock be moved from its place?

New Heart English Bible
You who tear yourself in your anger, shall the earth be forsaken for you? Or shall the rock be removed out of its place?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Why do you rip yourself apart in anger? Should the earth be abandoned for your sake or a boulder be dislodged?

JPS Tanakh 1917
Thou that tearest thyself in thine anger, Shall the earth be forsaken for thee? Or shall the rock be removed out of its place?

New American Standard 1977
“O you who tear yourself in your anger— For your sake is the earth to be abandoned, Or the rock to be moved from its place?

Jubilee Bible 2000
O thou that dost tear thy soul in thine anger; shall the earth be forsaken because of thee and shall the rocks be removed out of their place?

King James 2000 Bible
He tears himself in his anger: shall the earth be forsaken for you? and shall the rock be removed out of its place?

American King James Version
He tears himself in his anger: shall the earth be forsaken for you? and shall the rock be removed out of his place?

American Standard Version
Thou that tearest thyself in thine anger, Shall the earth be forsaken for thee? Or shall the rock be removed out of its place?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Thou that destroyest thy soul in thy fury, shall the earth be forsaken for thee, and shall rocks be removed out of their place?

Darby Bible Translation
Thou that tearest thyself in thine anger, shall the earth be forsaken for thee? and shall the rock be removed out of its place?

English Revised Version
Thou that tearest thyself in thine anger, shall the earth be forsaken for thee? or shall the rock be removed out of its place?

Webster's Bible Translation
He teareth himself in his anger: shall the earth be forsaken for thee? and shall the rock be removed out of its place?

World English Bible
You who tear yourself in your anger, shall the earth be forsaken for you? Or shall the rock be removed out of its place?

Young's Literal Translation
(He is tearing himself in his anger.) For thy sake is earth forsaken? And removed is a rock from its place?
Study Bible
Bildad: God Punishes the Wicked
3Why are we regarded as cattle, as stupid in your sight? 4You who tear yourself in anger— should the earth be forsaken on your account, or the rocks be moved from their place? 5Indeed, the lamp of the wicked is extinguished; the flame of his fire does not glow.…
Cross References
Job 18:3
Why are we regarded as cattle, as stupid in your sight?

Job 18:5
Indeed, the lamp of the wicked is extinguished; the flame of his fire does not glow.

Treasury of Scripture

He tears himself in his anger: shall the earth be forsaken for you? and shall the rock be removed out of his place?

teareth

Job 5:2 For wrath kills the foolish man, and envy slays the silly one.

Job 13:14 Why do I take my flesh in my teeth, and put my life in my hand?

Job 16:9 He tears me in his wrath, who hates me: he gnashes on me with his …

Jonah 4:9 And God said to Jonah, Do you well to be angry for the gourd? And …

Mark 9:18 And wherever he takes him, he tears him: and he foams, and gnashes …

Luke 9:39 And, see, a spirit takes him, and he suddenly cries out; and it tears …

himself. Heb. his soul. shall the

Job 40:8 Will you also cancel my judgment? will you condemn me, that you may …

Ezekiel 9:9 Then said he to me, The iniquity of the house of Israel and Judah …

the rock

Job 14:18 And surely the mountains falling comes to nothing, and the rock is …

Isaiah 54:10 For the mountains shall depart, and the hills be removed; but my …

Matthew 24:35 Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away.







(4) He teareth himself in his anger.--As Eliphaz had charged Job (Job 15:4) with the evil tendencies of his speeches, so Bildad here compares him to a maniac, and assumes that the effect of his teaching will be to banish God from the earth, and remove the strength and hope of man. The last clause is a direct quotation from Job in Job 14:18; it looks, therefore, very much like a wilful perversion of Job's words, for it is clear that he used them very differently. Even if there were no intentional misrepresentation Bildad applies Job's words to his own purposes. The drift of his question is, "Can you expect the course of God's providence to be altered for you? On the contrary, the retribution that awaits the wicked is sure and swift; for verily (Job 18:5) the light of the wicked shall be put out."

Verse 4. - He teareth himself in his anger. The Hebrew idiom, which allows of rapid transitions from the second to the third person, and vice versa, cannot be transferred without harshness to our modern speech. Our Revisers have given the true force of the original by discarding the third person, and translating, "Thou that tearest thyself in thine anger." There is probably an allusion to Job 16:9, where Job had represented God as "tearing him in his wrath." Bildad says it is not God who tests him - he tears himself. Shall the earth be forsaken for thee? i.e. "Shall the course of the world be altered to meet thy wishes, to suit thy case?" Job had wished for all manner of impossible things (Job 3:3-6; Job 9:32-35; Job 13:21, 22; Job 16:21; Job 17:3). Bildad's reproach is thus not wholly unjust. But he makes no allowance for the wild utter-shoes of one who is half distraught. And shall the rock be removed out of his place? Shall that which is most solid and firm give way, and alter its nature? He teareth himself in his anger,.... Or "his soul" (l), meaning Job, and referring to what he had said in Job 16:9; Now, says Bildad, it is neither God nor man that tears you, it is you yourself; representing Job as a madman, rending his clothes, tearing his flesh, and even his very soul; for by his passion which he expressed, whether to God or his friends, it did himself the most hurt, he broke his peace, and spoiled his comfort, and ruined his health, and made himself the most unhappy of mankind, by giving vent to his passion, to his wrath and anger, which slays and a man, Job 5:2; here a charge of impatience is suggested, contrary to the character even of Job, James 5:11;

shall the earth be forsaken for thee? through fear of thee, because of thy rage and fury; dost thou think that the inhabitants of the earth will flee before thee, at thy storming, rage, and wrath? before God none can stand when he is angry: there is no abiding his indignation when his fury is poured out like fire, and persons of the greatest rank will flee to the rocks and mountains to hide them from his face and fury; but what dost thou think, or make thyself to be, to be as Deity, that the inhabitants of the earth should flee fore thee, and forsake it? or when thou diest, dost thou think that all the inhabitants of the earth will die with thee, and so it will be forsaken for thy sake? taking the hint from what Job had said, Job 17:16; or dost thou think thyself a man of so much importance and consequence in the earth that when thou diest there will not be a man left of any worth and notice, that all might as well die with thee? or will God drop the government of the world on thy account? will he no more employ his care and providence in concerning himself in the affairs of the world, but let all things go as they will, and so the earth, as to his providential regards to it, be forsaken for thy sake? will God neither do good to good men, nor punish bad men? which must be the case according to thy doctrine; but will God counteract this method of his providence, he has always taken in the earth, that thou mayest appear not to be an evil man, as might be concluded from thine afflictions, but a good man notwithstanding them?

and shall the rock be removed out of his place? which is not usual, nor can it be done by man; it may be done by God, who touches the mountains, and they smoke, and at whose presence they drop and move, as Sinai did, and as the mountains and hills will flee away at the presence of the Judge of all the earth, when he appears; but no such phenomenon can be expected upon the presence and sight of a man; much less can God himself, who is often called a Rock, and is immovable, unalterable, and unchangeable in his nature, perfections, purposes, and the counsels of his will, be made to act contrary to either of them, Deuteronomy 32:4; nor will he do it for the sake of any man; he does all things after the counsel of his own will; he takes a constant course in Providence, in the government of the world, canst thou think that he will go out of his usual way for thy sake, in punishing wicked men, and rewarding good men? you may as soon imagine that a rock will be removed out of its place as the ordinary course of Providence will be altered on thy account; to suppose this is presumption, pride, and arrogance, which is what Bildad means to fasten upon Job.

(l) "animam suam", Pagninus, Montanus, &c. 4. Rather, turning to Job, "thou that tearest thyself in anger" (Job 5:2).

be forsaken?—become desolate. He alludes here to Job's words as to the "rock," crumbling away (Job 14:18, 19); but in a different application. He says bitterly "for thee." Wert thou not punished as thou art, and as thou art unwilling to bear, the eternal order of the universe would be disturbed and the earth become desolate through unavenged wickedness [Umbreit]. Bildad takes it for granted Job is a great sinner (Job 8:3-6; Isa 24:5, 6). "Shall that which stands fast as a rock be removed for your special accommodation?"18:1-4 Bildad had before given Job good advice and encouragement; here he used nothing but rebukes, and declared his ruin. And he concluded that Job shut out the providence of God from the management of human affairs, because he would not admit himself to be wicked.
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OT Poetry: Job 18:4 You who tear yourself in your anger (Jb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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