Psalm 6:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
For the director of music. With stringed instruments. According to sheminith. A psalm of David. LORD, do not rebuke me in your anger or discipline me in your wrath.

New Living Translation
For the choir director: A psalm of David, to be accompanied by an eight-stringed instrument. O LORD, don't rebuke me in your anger or discipline me in your rage.

English Standard Version
To the choirmaster: with stringed instruments; according to The Sheminith. A Psalm of David. O LORD, rebuke me not in your anger, nor discipline me in your wrath.

New American Standard Bible
For the choir director; with stringed instruments, upon an eight-string lyre. A Psalm of David. O LORD, do not rebuke me in Your anger, Nor chasten me in Your wrath.

King James Bible
To the chief Musician on Neginoth upon Sheminith, A Psalm of David. O LORD, rebuke me not in thine anger, neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For the choir director: with stringed instruments, according to Sheminith. A Davidic psalm. LORD, do not rebuke me in Your anger; do not discipline me in Your wrath.

International Standard Version
LORD, in your anger, do not rebuke me, in your wrath, do not discipline me.

NET Bible
For the music director, to be accompanied by stringed instruments, according to the sheminith style; a psalm of David. LORD, do not rebuke me in your anger! Do not discipline me in your raging fury!

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Lord Jehovah, do not rebuke me in your wrath, neither discipline me in your anger.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
[For the choir director; with stringed instruments, on the [sheminith]; a psalm by David.] O LORD, do not punish me in your anger or discipline me in your rage.

Jubilee Bible 2000
O LORD, rebuke me not in thine anger, neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure.

King James 2000 Bible
O LORD, rebuke me not in your anger, neither chasten me in your hot displeasure.

American King James Version
O LORD, rebuke me not in your anger, neither chasten me in your hot displeasure.

American Standard Version
O Jehovah, rebuke me not in thine anger, Neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Unto the end, in verses, a psalm for David, for the octave. O Lord, rebuke me not in thy indignation, nor chastise me in thy wrath.

Darby Bible Translation
{To the chief Musician. On stringed instruments, upon Sheminith. A Psalm of David.} Jehovah, rebuke me not in thine anger, and chasten me not in thy hot displeasure.

English Revised Version
For the Chief Musician; on stringed instruments, set to the Sheminith. A Psalm of David. O LORD, rebuke me not in thine anger, neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure.

Webster's Bible Translation
To the chief Musician on Neginoth upon Sheminith, A Psalm of David. O LORD, rebuke me not in thy anger, neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure.

World English Bible
Yahweh, don't rebuke me in your anger, neither discipline me in your wrath.

Young's Literal Translation
To the Overseer with stringed instruments, on the octave. -- A Psalm of David. O Jehovah, in Thine anger reprove me not, Nor in Thy fury chastise me.
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

6:1-7 These verses speak the language of a heart truly humbled, of a broken and contrite spirit under great afflictions, sent to awaken conscience and mortify corruption. Sickness brought sin to his remembrance, and he looked upon it as a token of God's displeasure against him. The affliction of his body will be tolerable, if he has comfort in his soul. Christ's sorest complaint, in his sufferings, was of the trouble of his soul, and the want of his Father's smiles. Every page of Scripture proclaims the fact, that salvation is only of the Lord. Man is a sinner, his case can only be reached by mercy; and never is mercy more illustrious than in restoring backsliders. With good reason we may pray, that if it be the will of God, and he has any further work for us or our friends to do in this world, he will yet spare us or them to serve him. To depart and be with Christ is happiest for the saints; but for them to abide in the flesh is more profitable for the church.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 1. - O Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger. The psalmist begins by deprecating God's wrath and displeasure. He is conscious of some grievous sin, deserving rebuke and chastisement, and he does not ask to be spared his chastisement; but he would fain be chastised in love, not in anger (comp. Jeremiah 10:24, "O Lord, correct me, but with judgment; not in thine anger, lest thou bring me to nothing"). Neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure; or, in thy wrath. In its primary sense, humah (חמה) is no doubt "heat," "glow; ' but the secondary sense of "anger," "wrath," is quite as common.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

O Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger, The Lord sometimes rebukes or reproves men by his spirit, and sometimes by his word and ministers, and sometimes by his providences, and that on account of sin; to bring to a sense and acknowledgment of it; and particularly for remissness in duty, or neglect of it; and for trusting in the creature, or in any outward enjoyment, boasting of it, and loving it too much; and these rebukes of his own people are always in love, and never in wrath, though they sometimes fear they are; see Psalm 88:7, Lamentations 3:1; and therefore deprecate them, as the psalmist here does; not the thing itself, but the manner in which it is apprehended it is done, or doing;

neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure; when God chastens his own people it is not in a way of vindictive wrath, or as a proper punishment for sin; for this would be contrary to Christ's suretyship engagements and performances, and to the doctrine of his satisfaction for sin; it would draw a veil over it, and render it of none effect; it would be contrary to the justice of God to punish both surety and principal; and to the everlasting love of God to them, in which he always rests, and from which there can be no separation; nor would they be dealt with as children; and besides would be condemned with the world, and killed with the second death; whereas they will not, though chastened of God, it is the chastening of a father, is very instructive to them, and is always for their good, spiritual and eternal; is in measure, in judgment, and in love; and never in fury and hot displeasure; but this being feared, is deprecated.

The Treasury of David

1 O Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger, neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure.

2 Have mercy upon me, O Lord; for I am weak: O Lord, heal me; for my bones are vexed.

3 My soul is also sore vexed: but thou, O Lord, how long?

4 Return, O Lord, deliver my soul: oh save me for thy mercies' sake.

5 For in death there is no remembrance of thee: in the grave who shall give thee thanks?

6 I am weary with my groaning; all the night make I my bed to swim; I water my couch with my tears.

7 Mine eye is consumed because of grief; it waxeth old because of all mine enemies.

Having read through the first division, in order to see it as a whole, we will now look at it verse by verse. "O Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger." The Psalmist is very conscious that he deserves to be rebuked, and he feels, moreover, that the rebuke in some form or other must come upon him, if not for condemnation, yet for conviction and sanctification. "Corn is cleaned with wind, and the soul with chastenings." It were folly to pray against the golden hand which enriches us by its blows. He does not ask that the rebuke may be totally withheld, for he might thus lose a blessing in disguise; but, "Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger." If thou remindest me of my sin, it is good; but, oh, remind me not of it as one incensed against me, lest thy servant's heart should sink in despair. Thus saith Jeremiah, "O Lord, correct me, but with judgment; not in thine anger, lest thou bring me to nothing." I know that I must be chastened, and though I shrink from thy rod yet do I feel that it will be for my benefit; but, oh, my God, "chasten me not in thy hot displeasure," lest the rod become a sword, and lest in smiting, thou shouldest also kill. So may we pray that the chastisements of our gracious God, if they may not be entirely removed, may at least be sweetened by the consciousness that they are "not in anger, but in his dear covenant love."

Psalm 6:2, Psalm 6:3

"Have mercy upon me, O Lord; for I am weak." Though I deserve destruction, yet let thy mercy pity my frailty. This is the right way to plead with God if we would prevail. Urge not your goodness or your greatness, but plead your sin and your littleness. Cry, "I am weak," therefore O Lord, give me strength and crush me not. Send not forth the fury of thy tempest against so weak a vessel. Temper the wind to the shorn lamb. Be tender and pitiful to a poor withering flower, and break it not from its stem. Surely this is the plea that a sick man would urge to move the pity of his fellow if he were striving with him, "Deal gently with me, 'for I am weak.'" A sense of sin had so spoiled the Psalmist's pride, so taken away his vaunted strength, that he found himself weak to obey the law, weak through the sorrow that was in him, too weak, perhaps, to lay hold on the promise. "I am weak." The original may be read, "I am one who droops," or withered like a blighted plant. Ah! beloved, we know what this means, for we, too, have seen our glory stained, and our beauty like a faded flower.

"O Lord heal me; for my bones are vexed." Here he prays for healing, not merely the mitigation of the ills he endured, but their entire removal, and the curing of the wounds which had arisen therefrom. His bones were "shaken," as the Hebrew has it. His terror had become so great that his very bones shook; not only did his flesh quiver, but the bones, the solid pillars of the house of manhood, were made to tremble. "My bones are shaken." Ah, when the soul has a sense of sin, it is enough to make the bones shake; it is enough to make a man's hair stand up on end to see the flames of hell beneath him, an angry God above him, and danger and doubt surrounding him. Well might he say, "My bones are shaken." Lest, however, we should imagine that it was merely bodily sickness - although bodily sickness might be the outward sign - the Psalmist goes on to say, "My soul is also sore vexed." Soul-trouble is the very soul of trouble. It matters not that the bones shake if the soul be firm, but when the soul itself is also sore vexed this is agony indeed. "But thou, O Lord, how long?" This sentence ends abruptly, for words failed, and grief drowned the little comfort which dawned upon him. The Psalmist had still, however, some hope; but that hope was only in his God. He therefore cries. "O Lord, how long?" The coming of Christ into the soul in his priestly robes of grace is the grand hope of the penitent soul; and, indeed, in some form or other, Christ's appearance is, and ever has been, the hope of the saints.

Calvin's favourite exclamation was "Domine usque quo" - "O Lord, how long?" Nor could his sharpest pains, during a life of anguish, force from him any other word. Surely this is the cry of the saints under the altar, "O Lord, how long?" And this should be the cry of the saints waiting for the millennial glories, "Why are his chariots so long in coming; Lord, how long?" Those of us who have passed through conviction of sin knew what it was to count our minutes hours, and our hours years, while mercy delayed its coming. We watched for the dawn of grace, as they that watch for the morning. Earnestly did our anxious spirits ask, "O Lord, how long?"

Psalm 6:4

"Return, O Lord; deliver my soul." As God's absence was the main cause of his misery, so his return would be enough to deliver him from his trouble. "Oh save me for thy mercies' sake." He knows where to look, and what arm to lay hold upon. He does not lay hold on God's left hand of justice, but on his right hand of mercy. He knew his iniquity too well to think of merit, or appeal to anything but the grace of God.

continued...

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

PSALM 6

Ps 6:1-10. On Neginoth (See on [571]Ps 4:1, title) upon Sheminith—the eighth—an instrument for the eighth key; or, more probably, the bass, as it is contrasted with Alamoth (the treble, Ps 46:1) in 1Ch 15:20, 21. In deep affliction the Psalmist appeals to God's mercy for relief from chastisement, which otherwise must destroy him, and thus disable him for God's service. Sure of a gracious answer, he triumphantly rebukes his foes.

1. He owns his ill desert in begging a relief from chastisement.

Psalm 6:1 Additional Commentaries
Context
Don't Rebuke Me in Your Anger
1For the choir director; with stringed instruments, upon an eight-string lyre. A Psalm of David. O LORD, do not rebuke me in Your anger, Nor chasten me in Your wrath. 2Be gracious to me, O LORD, for I am pining away; Heal me, O LORD, for my bones are dismayed.…
Cross References
1 Chronicles 15:21
and Mattithiah, Eliphelehu, Mikneiah, Obed-Edom, Jeiel and Azaziah were to play the harps, directing according to sheminith.

Psalm 27:9
Do not hide your face from me, do not turn your servant away in anger; you have been my helper. Do not reject me or forsake me, God my Savior.

Psalm 38:1
A psalm of David. A petition. LORD, do not rebuke me in your anger or discipline me in your wrath.

Psalm 118:18
The LORD has chastened me severely, but he has not given me over to death.

Jeremiah 10:24
Discipline me, LORD, but only in due measure-- not in your anger, or you will reduce me to nothing.

Jeremiah 30:11
I am with you and will save you,' declares the LORD. 'Though I completely destroy all the nations among which I scatter you, I will not completely destroy you. I will discipline you but only in due measure; I will not let you go entirely unpunished.'
Treasury of Scripture

O LORD, rebuke me not in your anger, neither chasten me in your hot displeasure.

A.M.

Psalm 4:1 Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness: you have enlarged …

Sheminith. or, the eighth

Psalm 12:1 Help, LORD; for the godly man ceases; for the faithful fail from …

1 Chronicles 15:21 And Mattithiah, and Elipheleh, and Mikneiah, and Obededom, and Jeiel, …

rebuke

Psalm 2:5 Then shall he speak to them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure.

Psalm 38:1 O lord, rebuke me not in your wrath: neither chasten me in your hot displeasure.

Isaiah 54:9 For this is as the waters of Noah to me: for as I have sworn that …

Isaiah 57:16 For I will not contend for ever, neither will I be always wroth: …

Jeremiah 10:24 O LORD, correct me, but with judgment; not in your anger, lest you …

Jeremiah 46:28 Fear you not, O Jacob my servant, said the LORD: for I am with you…

1 Corinthians 11:31,32 For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged…

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