Job 41:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
"Can you pull in Leviathan with a fishhook or tie down its tongue with a rope?

New Living Translation
"Can you catch Leviathan with a hook or put a noose around its jaw?

English Standard Version
“Can you draw out Leviathan with a fishhook or press down his tongue with a cord?

New American Standard Bible
"Can you draw out Leviathan with a fishhook? Or press down his tongue with a cord?

King James Bible
Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Can you pull in Leviathan with a hook or tie his tongue down with a rope?

International Standard Version
"Can you draw Leviathan out of the water with a hook, or tie down his tongue with a rope?

NET Bible
"Can you pull in Leviathan with a hook, and tie down its tongue with a rope?

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"Can you pull Leviathan out [of the water] with a fishhook or tie its tongue down with a rope?

Jubilee Bible 2000
Canst thou draw out leviathan with a hook or with the cord which thou lettest down on his tongue?

King James 2000 Bible
Can you draw out leviathan with a hook? or his tongue with a cord which you let down?

American King James Version
Can you draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which you let down?

American Standard Version
Canst thou draw out leviathan with a fishhook? Or press down his tongue with a cord?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Canst thou draw out the leviathan with a hook, or canst thou tie his tongue with a cord?

Darby Bible Translation
Wilt thou draw out the leviathan with the hook, and press down his tongue with a cord?

English Revised Version
Canst thou draw out leviathan with a fish hook? or press down his tongue with a cord?

Webster's Bible Translation
Canst thou draw out leviathan with a hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?

World English Bible
"Can you draw out Leviathan with a fishhook, or press down his tongue with a cord?

Young's Literal Translation
Dost thou draw leviathan with an angle? And with a rope thou lettest down -- his tongue?
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

41:1-34 Concerning Leviathan. - The description of the Leviathan, is yet further to convince Job of his own weakness, and of God's almighty power. Whether this Leviathan be a whale or a crocodile, is disputed. The Lord, having showed Job how unable he was to deal with the Leviathan, sets forth his own power in that mighty creature. If such language describes the terrible force of Leviathan, what words can express the power of God's wrath? Under a humbling sense of our own vileness, let us revere the Divine Majesty; take and fill our allotted place, cease from our own wisdom, and give all glory to our gracious God and Saviour. Remembering from whom every good gift cometh, and for what end it was given, let us walk humbly with the Lord.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 1-34. - The crowning description of a natural marvel - the "leviathan," or crocodile - is now given, and with an elaboration to which there is no parallel in the rest of Scripture. It forms, however, a fit climax to the gradually more and more elaborate descriptions of Job 38:39-41; Job 39:1-30; and Job 40:15-24. Verse 1. - Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? The word leviathan, or more properly livyathan, which has previously occurred in ch. 3:8, and is found also in Psalm 74:14; Psalm 104:26; and Isaiah 27:1, seems to be derived from לוי, "twisting," and תן, "a monster," whence the תּנּין or תּנּים of the Pentateuch and also of Job (Job 7:12), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 9:11), and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 29:3). It is thus a descriptive epithet rather than a name, and has not unnaturally been used to designate more than one kind of animal. The best modern critics regard it as applied sometimes to a python or large serpent, sometimes to a cetacean, a whale or grampus, and sometimes, as hero, to the crocodile. This last application is now almost universally accepted. The crocodile was fished for by the Egyptians with a hook, and in the time of Herodotus was frequently caught and killed (Herod., 2:70); but probably in Job's day no one had been so venturous as to attack him. Or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down? rather, or press down his tongue with a cord? (see the Revised Version); i.e. "tie a rope round his lower jaw, and so press down his tongue." Many savage animals are represented in the Assyrian sculptures as led along by a rope attached to their mouths.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook?.... That is, draw it out of the sea or river as anglers draw out smaller fishes with a line or hook? the question suggests it cannot be done; whether by the "leviathan" is meant the whale, which was the most generally received notion; or the crocodile, as Bochart, who has been followed by many; or the "orca", a large fish of the whale kind with many teeth, as Hasaeus, it is not easy to say "Leviathan" is a compound word of than the first syllable of "thanni", rendered either a whale, or a dragon, or a serpent, and of "levi", which signifies conjunction, from the close joining of its scales, Job 41:15; the patriarch Levi had his name from the same word; see Genesis 29:34; and the name bids fairest for the crocodile, and which is called "thannin", Ezekiel 29:3. Could the crocodile be established as the "leviathan", and the behemoth as the river horse, the transition from the one to the other would appear very easy; since, as Pliny says (a), there is a sort of a kindred between them, being of the same river, the river Nile, and so may be thought to be better known to Job than the whale; though it is not to be concealed what Pliny says (b), that whales have been seen in the Arabian seas; he speaks of one that came into the river of Arabia, six hundred feet long, and three hundred and sixty broad. There are some things in the description of this creature that seem to agree best with the crocodile, and others that suit better with the whale, and some with neither;

or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down? into the river or sea, as anglers do, with lead to it to make it sink below the surface of the water, and a quill or cork that it may not sink too deep; but this creature is not to be taken in this manner; and which may be objected to the crocodile being meant, since that has no tongue (c), or at least so small that it is not seen, and cleaves close to its lower jaw, which never moves; and is taken with hooks and cords, as Herodotus (d), Diodorus Siculus (e), and Leo Africanus (f), testify; but not so the whale.

(See definition for 03882. Editor.)

(a) Nat. Hist. l. 28. c. 8. (b) Ib. l. 32. c. 1.((c) Diodor. Sicul. l. 1. p. 31. Herodot. Euterpe, sive, l. 2. c. 68. Solin. c. 45. Plutarch. de Is. & Osir. Vid. Aristot. de Animal. l. 2. c. 17. & l. 4. c. 11. Plin. Nat. Hist. l. 11. c. 37. Thevenot, ut supra. (Travels, part 1. c. 72.) Sandys's Travels, l. 2. p. 78. (d) Ut supra, (Herodot. Euterpe, sive, l. 2.) c. 70. (e) Ut supra. (Diodor. Sicul. l. 1. p. 31.) (f) Descriptio Africae, l. 9. p. 762. See Sandy's Travels, ut supra, (l. 2.) p. 79.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

CHAPTER 41

Job 41:1-34.

1. leviathan—literally, "the twisted animal," gathering itself in folds: a synonym to the Thannin (Job 3:8, Margin; see Ps 74:14; type of the Egyptian tyrant; Ps 104:26; Isa 27:1; the Babylon tyrant). A poetical generalization for all cetacean, serpentine, and saurian monsters (see on [563]Job 40:15, hence all the description applies to no one animal); especially the crocodile; which is naturally described after the river horse, as both are found in the Nile.

tongue … lettest down?—The crocodile has no tongue, or a very small one cleaving to the lower jaw. But as in fishing the tongue of the fish draws the baited hook to it, God asks, Canst thou in like manner take leviathan?

Job 41:1 Additional Commentaries
Context
God's Power Shown in Creatures
1"Can you draw out Leviathan with a fishhook? Or press down his tongue with a cord? 2"Can you put a rope in his nose Or pierce his jaw with a hook?…
Cross References
Job 3:8
May those who curse days curse that day, those who are ready to rouse Leviathan.

Job 40:24
Can anyone capture it by the eyes, or trap it and pierce its nose?

Psalm 74:14
It was you who crushed the heads of Leviathan and gave it as food to the creatures of the desert.

Psalm 104:26
There the ships go to and fro, and Leviathan, which you formed to frolic there.

Isaiah 27:1
In that day, the LORD will punish with his sword-- his fierce, great and powerful sword-- Leviathan the gliding serpent, Leviathan the coiling serpent; he will slay the monster of the sea.
Treasury of Scripture

Can you draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which you let down?

leviathan. that is, a whale, or a whirlpool

Job 3:8 Let them curse it that curse the day, who are ready to raise up their mourning.

Psalm 74:14 You brake the heads of leviathan in pieces, and gave him to be meat …

Psalm 104:26 There go the ships: there is that leviathan, whom you have made to play therein.

Isaiah 27:1 In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword shall …

lettest down. Heb. drownest

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