Revelation 9:12
New International Version
The first woe is past; two other woes are yet to come.

New Living Translation
The first terror is past, but look, two more terrors are coming!

English Standard Version
The first woe has passed; behold, two woes are still to come.

Berean Study Bible
The first woe has passed. Behold, two woes are still to follow.

Berean Literal Bible
The first woe has passed. Behold, two woes still are coming after these things.

King James Bible
One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.

New King James Version
One woe is past. Behold, still two more woes are coming after these things.

New American Standard Bible
The first woe has passed; behold, two woes are still coming after these things.

NASB 1995
The first woe is past; behold, two woes are still coming after these things.

NASB 1977
The first woe is past; behold, two woes are still coming after these things.

Amplified Bible
The first woe has passed; behold, two woes are still coming after these things.

Christian Standard Bible
The first woe has passed. There are still two more woes to come after this.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The first woe has passed. There are still two more woes to come after this.

American Standard Version
The first Woe is past: behold, there come yet two Woes hereafter.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
One woe is gone; behold, again two woes are coming.

Contemporary English Version
The first horrible thing has now happened! But wait. Two more horrible things will happen soon.

Douay-Rheims Bible
One woe is past, and behold there come yet two woes more hereafter.

English Revised Version
The first Woe is past: behold, there come yet two Woes hereafter.

Good News Translation
The first horror is over; after this there are still two more horrors to come.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
The first catastrophe is over. After these things there are two more catastrophes yet to come.

International Standard Version
The first catastrophe is over. After these things, there are still two more catastrophes to come.

Literal Standard Version
The first woe went forth, behold, there yet come two woes after these things.

NET Bible
The first woe has passed, but two woes are still coming after these things!

New Heart English Bible
The first woe is past. Look, there are still two woes coming after this.

Weymouth New Testament
The first woe is past; two other woes have still to come.

World English Bible
The first woe is past. Behold, there are still two woes coming after this.

Young's Literal Translation
The first woe did go forth, lo, there come yet two woes after these things.

Additional Translations ...
Context
The Fifth Trumpet
11They were ruled by a king, the angel of the Abyss. His name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in Greek it is Apollyon. 12The first woe has passed. Behold, two woes are still to follow. 13Then the sixth angel sounded his trumpet, and I heard a voice from the four horns of the golden altar before God…

Cross References
Revelation 8:13
And as I observed, I heard an eagle flying overhead, calling in a loud voice, "Woe! Woe! Woe to those who dwell on the earth, because of the trumpet blasts about to be sounded by the remaining three angels!"

Revelation 11:14
The second woe has passed. Behold, the third woe is coming shortly.


Treasury of Scripture

One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.

woe.

Revelation 9:1,2
And the fifth angel sounded, and I saw a star fall from heaven unto the earth: and to him was given the key of the bottomless pit…

two.

Revelation 9:13-21
And the sixth angel sounded, and I heard a voice from the four horns of the golden altar which is before God, …

Revelation 8:13
And I beheld, and heard an angel flying through the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice, Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabiters of the earth by reason of the other voices of the trumpet of the three angels, which are yet to sound!

Revelation 11:14
The second woe is past; and, behold, the third woe cometh quickly.









(12) One woe is passed . . .--Better, The one woe has passed; behold there cometh (the verb is in the ( singular) yet two woes after these things. Here is the patience and faith of the saints. The troubles which pass only yield place to more, the rest and the victory are not yet; the powers of evil have not exhausted themselves, the iniquity of the social and spiritual Amorites is not yet full,

(12) THE SIXTH TRUMPET--THE SECOND WOE TRUMPET.--The first point which will strike the reader is that the plague under this trumpet resembles the last, though it is one of much more aggravated nature. Again we have vast hosts, with the powers of the horse, the lion, and the viper, at command, but the destructive elements are increased, the multitudes are more numerous, the horses' heads grow lion-like. With the mouth breathing forth threatening and slaughter, as well as with the tail armed with deadly fangs, they can deal forth, not torment only, as in the last vision, but death itself, to a vast proportion of the human race. To aid in this new desolation new forces are released: the four angels bound near the Euphrates are loosed. The next point to notice is that, even more directly than before, we are reminded that the moral and spiritual aspect of these visions should claim our thought. The aim of the plague is to exhibit the death-working power of false thoughts, false customs, false beliefs, and to rouse men to forsake the false worships, worldliness, and self-indulgence into which they had fallen (Revelation 9:20-21). The Psalmist has told us that great plagues remain for the ungodly. Here, whatever special interpretations we may adopt, is an illustration of the Psalmist's words. The enemy against whom these foes are gathered is the great world lost in false thoughts, luxurious ways, dishonest customs; that world which in the very essential genius of its nature is hostile to goodness and the God of goodness. But the hosts which come against this sin-drowned world are not merely plagues, as famine and pestilence, they are plagues which are the results of the world-spirit, and are to a great extent, therefore, the creation of those who suffer. For there are evils which are loosed upon the world by the natural action of sin and sinful customs. As the evil spirit mingled for the first time in the plague of the fifth trumpet, so from all quarters (typified by the four angels) new powers of misery arise. Nor must another feature be overlooked: the historical basis of the Apocalypse is the past history of the chosen people; God's dealings with men always follow the same lines. The Apocalypse shows us the same principles working in higher levels and in wider arena. The Israel of God, the Church of Christ, with its grand opportunities, takes the place of the national Israel. Its advance is against the world, and the trumpets of war are sounded. Its progress is, like Israel's, at first a success; it gains its footing in the world, but the world-spirit which infects it is its worst and bitterest foe; it becomes timid, and seeks false alliances; it has its Hezekiahs, men of astonishing faith in hours of real peril, and of astonishing timidity in times of comparative safety, who can defy a real foe, but fall before a pretended ally, and who in mistaken friendliness lay the foundation of more terrible dangers (2Kings 20:12-19). The people who are victorious by faith at Jericho lay themselves open by their timid worldliness to the dangers of a Babylonish foe. The plague which falls on the spirit of worldliness does not spare the worldliness in the Church. he overthrow of corrupted systems bearing the Christian name is not a victory of the world over the Church, but of the Church over the world. He who mistakes the husk for the grain, and the shell for the kernel, will despair for Christianity when organisations disappear; but he who remembers that God is able to raise up even of the stones children to Abraham, will never be confounded; he knows the vision may linger, but it cannot come too late (Hebrews 2:3). With all this section the prophecy of Habakkuk should be compared, especially Revelation 1:6-11; Revelation 1:14-15; Revelation 2:1-14; Revelation 3:17-19. The history of Israel is in much the key to the history of the world. . . .

Verse 12. - One woe is past; the one woe, or the first woe. "Woe" (ἡ οὐαί) is feminine; perhaps because expressing the idea of tribulation, such words being generally feminine in the Greek. Some have thought that these words are a further announcement by the eagle of Revelation 8:13; but there is nothing to lead us to suppose that they are not the words of the writer. And, behold, there come two woes more hereafter. Omit "and:" behold, there cometh yet two woes hereafter. The verb is singular in א, A, and others; the plural is found in א, B, P, and others. Alford says, "singular, the verb applying simply to that which is future, without reference as yet to its plurality." But probably οὐαί, although written as a feminine in the preceding clause, being really indeclinable, is treated as a neuter; and thus the singular verb is made to agree with the neuter plural, in conformity with the rules of Greek grammar. The second woe extends from this place to Revelation 11:14, and the third woe is contained in Revelation 11:14-19, especially in Revelation 11:18.

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
The
(hē)
Article - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

first
μία (mia)
Adjective - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's 1520: One. (including the neuter Hen); a primary numeral; one.

woe
Οὐαὶ (Ouai)
Noun
Strong's 3759: Woe!, alas!, uttered in grief or denunciation. A primary exclamation of grief; 'woe'.

has passed.
ἀπῆλθεν (apēlthen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 565: From apo and erchomai; to go off, aside or behind, literally or figuratively.

Behold,
ἰδοὺ (idou)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's 2400: See! Lo! Behold! Look! Second person singular imperative middle voice of eido; used as imperative lo!

two
δύο (dyo)
Adjective - Nominative Feminine Plural
Strong's 1417: Two. A primary numeral; 'two'.

woes
Οὐαὶ (Ouai)
Noun
Strong's 3759: Woe!, alas!, uttered in grief or denunciation. A primary exclamation of grief; 'woe'.

[are] still
ἔτι (eti)
Adverb
Strong's 2089: (a) of time: still, yet, even now, (b) of degree: even, further, more, in addition. Perhaps akin to etos; 'yet, ' still.

to follow.
ἔρχεται (erchetai)
Verb - Present Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's 2064: To come, go.


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NT Prophecy: Revelation 9:12 The first woe is past (Rev. Re Apocalypse)
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