Ephesians 2:16
New International Version
and in one body to reconcile both of them to God through the cross, by which he put to death their hostility.

New Living Translation
Together as one body, Christ reconciled both groups to God by means of his death on the cross, and our hostility toward each other was put to death.

English Standard Version
and might reconcile us both to God in one body through the cross, thereby killing the hostility.

Berean Study Bible
and reconciling both of them to God in one body through the cross, by which He extinguished their hostility.

Berean Literal Bible
and He might reconcile both to God in one body through the cross, by it having slain the hostility.

New American Standard Bible
and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, by it having put to death the enmity.

King James Bible
And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

Christian Standard Bible
He did this so that he might reconcile both to God in one body through the cross by which he put the hostility to death.

Contemporary English Version
On the cross Christ did away with our hatred for each other. He also made peace between us and God by uniting Jews and Gentiles in one body.

Good News Translation
By his death on the cross Christ destroyed their enmity; by means of the cross he united both races into one body and brought them back to God.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
He did this so that He might reconcile both to God in one body through the cross and put the hostility to death by it.

International Standard Version
and reconciling both groups to God in one body through the cross, on which he eliminated the hostility.

NET Bible
and to reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, by which the hostility has been killed.

New Heart English Bible
and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, by which he put to death their enmity.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And he has reconciled the two with God in one body, and in his crucifixion he has killed the hatred.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
He also brought them back to God in one body by his cross, on which he killed the hostility.

New American Standard 1977
and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, by it having put to death the enmity.

Jubilee Bible 2000
and to reconcile both with God by the cross {Gr. stauros – stake} in one body, having slain the enmity thereby;

King James 2000 Bible
And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

American King James Version
And that he might reconcile both to God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

American Standard Version
and might reconcile them both in one body unto God through the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

Douay-Rheims Bible
And might reconcile both to God in one body by the cross, killing the enmities in himself.

Darby Bible Translation
and might reconcile both in one body to God by the cross, having by it slain the enmity;

English Revised Version
and might reconcile them both in one body unto God through the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

Webster's Bible Translation
And that he might reconcile both to God in one body by the cross, having by it slain the enmity:

Weymouth New Testament
thus effecting peace, and to reconcile Jews and Gentiles in one body to God, by means of His cross--slaying by it their mutual enmity.

World English Bible
and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, having killed the hostility thereby.

Young's Literal Translation
and might reconcile both in one body to God through the cross, having slain the enmity in it,
Study Bible
One in Christ
15by abolishing in His flesh the law of commandments and decrees. He did this to create in Himself one new man out of the two, thus making peace 16and reconciling both of them to God in one body through the cross, by which He extinguished their hostility. 17He came and preached peace to you who were far away and peace to those who were near.…
Cross References
1 Corinthians 10:17
Because there is one loaf, we who are many are one body; for we all partake of the one loaf.

2 Corinthians 5:18
All this is from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Christ and gave us the ministry of reconciliation:

Ephesians 2:15
by abolishing in His flesh the law of commandments and decrees. He did this to create in Himself one new man out of the two, thus making peace

Ephesians 3:6
This mystery is that through the gospel the Gentiles are fellow heirs, fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus.

Ephesians 4:4
There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to one hope when you were called;

Colossians 1:20
and through Him to reconcile to Himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through the blood of His cross.

Colossians 1:22
But now He has reconciled you by Christ's physical body through death to present you holy, unblemished, and blameless in His presence--

Colossians 3:15
Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, for to this you were called as members of one body. And be thankful.

Treasury of Scripture

And that he might reconcile both to God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

reconcile.

Romans 5:10
For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.

2 Corinthians 5:18-21
And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ, and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation; …

Colossians 1:21-22
And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled …

having.

Ephesians 2:15
Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;

Romans 6:6
Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.

Romans 8:3,7
For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: …

thereby.







Lexicon
and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

reconciling
ἀποκαταλλάξῃ (apokatallaxē)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 604: To reconcile, change from one state of feeling to another. From apo and katallasso; to reconcile fully.

both [of them]
ἀμφοτέρους (amphoterous)
Adjective - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 297: Both (of two). Comparative of amphi; both.

to God
Θεῷ (Theō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2316: A deity, especially the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very.

in
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

one
ἑνὶ (heni)
Adjective - Dative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 1520: One. (including the neuter Hen); a primary numeral; one.

body
σώματι (sōmati)
Noun - Dative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 4983: Body, flesh; the body of the Church. From sozo; the body, used in a very wide application, literally or figuratively.

through
διὰ (dia)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1223: A primary preposition denoting the channel of an act; through.

the
τοῦ (tou)
Article - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

cross,
σταυροῦ (staurou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 4716: A cross.

by
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

which
αὐτῷ (autō)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Dative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

He extinguished
ἀποκτείνας (apokteinas)
Verb - Aorist Participle Active - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 615: To put to death, kill; fig: I abolish. From apo and kteino; to kill outright; figuratively, to destroy.

[their]
τὴν (tēn)
Article - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

hostility.
ἔχθραν (echthran)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 2189: Enmity, hostility, alienation. Feminine of echthros; hostility; by implication, a reason for opposition.
(16) And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body.--In this verse the latter subject opens--the reconciliation of all to God. On the reconciliation of man to God, see the great passage 2Corinthians 5:18-21. But it should be noted that in the original the word used here and in Colossians 1:20-21 (and nowhere else) is a compound signifying not simply to "conciliate," but properly to "reconcile,"--that is to reunite those who were originally united, but afterwards separated by the sin of man. This brings out the profound idea, which so especially characterises these Epistles, of a primeval unity of all created being in Christ, marred and broken by sin, and restored by His manifestation in human flesh. Note that the passage in the Colossians (on which see Notes) has a far wider scope than this passage--"having made peace through the blood of His cross, by Him to reconcile all things to Himself; by Him (I say), whether they be things on earth or things in heaven." On the other hand, this passage characteristically still lays stress on the idea "in one body"--that is, as throughout, His mystical body, the Church--although probably the phrase is suggested here by the thought of the natural body of the Lord offered on the cross, which is clearly referred to in Colossians 1:21. There is a similar connection of thought in 1Corinthians 10:16-17, "The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ? For we are all one bread, and one body."

By the cross, having slain the enmity thereby.--In this verse (in accordance with the context) "the enmity," which by His death He "slew," is the barrier between God and man, created by sin, but brought out by the Law, as hard and rigid law, "in ordinances" of which St. Paul does not hesitate to say that "sin took occasion by it," and "by it slew" man (Romans 7:11). This is illustrated by the cognate, though different, metaphor of Colossians 2:14, where it is said of Christ that He "blotted out the handwriting of ordinances which was against us, which was contrary unto us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to His cross." Compare also, in Galatians 2:19-20, the connection of spiritual "death to the Law" with our partaking of our Lord's crucifixion: "I, through the Law, am dead to the Law, that I might live unto God. I am crucified with Christ, nevertheless I live. . . . by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself for me." By His death Christ has both redeemed us from sin, and also "redeemed (properly, bought) us from the curse of the Law" (Galatians 3:13).

Verse 16. - And that he might reconcile both to God in one body by the cross. Exegetical of preceding statements, and making emphatic the fact of reconciliation to God on the same footing and by the same means; both were to be reconciled in, one body (see Ephesians 4:4) and by the cross. No preference was to be given to the Jew facilitating his union to Christ: the Gentile was to be taken into Christ's body as readily as the Jew. In reference to the sense in which reconciliation was effected by the cross of Jesus, some say it was only as the cross demonstrated to men the love of God and his willingness to bless them; while others maintain very strongly that it was as providing a satisfaction to God's justice for their guilt, and thus enabling him to receive and bless the sinner. Not only the analogy of other passages of Scripture as well as of this Epistle justifies the latter view, but preeminently the words, "by the cross." If Christ had only to proclaim God's friendship toward sinners, why should he have suffered on the cross? The cross as a mere pulpit is hideous; as an altar it is glorious. The love of God is ill revealed, if it subjected Jesus to unnecessary agony. The love of both Father and Son is indeed commended, if the agony was voluntarily borne by the Son, and permitted by the Father, as being indispensable for the pardon of the sinner. 'Αποκαταλλάξῃ denotes the whole process of reconciliation (see Eadie). Having slain the enmity thereby (or, thereon). "The enmity" is the same as at the beginning of ver. 15 - the enmity of man to God. The destruction of this enmity is one of the effects of the cross, though not the only effect; it is necessary to root out the enmity of the carnal mind. That this is the meaning here seems plain from Romans 5:10, "If, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son." The apostle there makes no allusion to the enmity of Jew and Gentile to each other, but to this wider fact - τὸ φρόνημα τῆς σαρκὸς ἔχθρα εἰς Θεόν. If any words can denote the result of a propitiatory sacrifice, it is surely "reconciled to God by the death of his Son." 2:14-18 Jesus Christ made peace by the sacrifice of himself; in every sense Christ was their Peace, the author, centre, and substance of their being at peace with God, and of their union with the Jewish believers in one church. Through the person, sacrifice, and mediation of Christ, sinners are allowed to draw near to God as a Father, and are brought with acceptance into his presence, with their worship and services, under the teaching of the Holy Spirit, as one with the Father and the Son. Christ purchased leave for us to come to God; and the Spirit gives a heart to come, and strength to come, and then grace to serve God acceptably.
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Alphabetical: and body both by cross death enmity God having he hostility in it might of one put reconcile the their them this through to which

NT Letters: Ephesians 2:16 And might reconcile them both in one (Ephes. Eph. Ep) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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