Acts 1:13
And when they were come in, they went up into an upper room, where stayed both Peter, and James, and John, and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas the brother of James.
Jump to: AlfordBarnesBengelBensonBICalvinCambridgeChrysostomClarkeDarbyEllicottExpositor'sExp DctExp GrkGaebeleinGSBGillGrayHaydockHastingsHomileticsICCJFBKellyKJTLangeMacLarenMHCMHCWMeyerParkerPNTPoolePulpitSermonSCOTTBVWSWESTSK
EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(13) They went up into an upper room, where abode . . .—Better, into the upper room, where they were abiding. The Greek noun has the article. The room may have been the same as that in which the Paschal Supper had been eaten (Mark 14:15). On the other hand, that room seems to have been different from that in which the disciples had lodged during the Paschal week, and to have been chosen specially for the occasion (Luke 22:8). The word used is also different in form. So far as we are able to distinguish between the two words, the room of the Paschal Supper was on the first floor, the guest-chamber, used for meals; that in which the disciples now met, on the second floor, or loft, which was used for retirement and prayer. It would seem from Luke 24:53, that they spent the greater part of each day in the Temple, and met together in the evening. The better MSS. give “prayer” only, without “supplication.” The prayer thus offered may be thought of as specially directed to the “promise of the Father.” Whether it was spoken or silent, unpremeditated or in some set form of words, like the Lord’s Prayer, we have no data to determine.

Peter, and James.—On the lists of the Twelve Apostles see Notes on Matthew 10:2-4. The points to be noticed are—(1) that Andrew stands last in the group of the first four, divided from his brother, thus agreeing with the list in St. Mark (Mark 3:17); (2) that Philip is in like manner divided from Bartholomew, and Thomas from Matthew; (3) that Zelotes appears here, as in Luke 6:15, instead of the Cananæan.

Acts 1:13-14. When they were come, they went up into an upper room — Where they usually held their meetings. The upper rooms, so frequently mentioned in Scripture, were chambers in the highest part of the houses, set apart by the Jews for private prayer. These, on account of their being so retired and convenient, the apostles now used for all the offices of religion. Here all the eleven were assembled, who all continued with one accord in prayer and supplication — And that with great intenseness and ardour of soul; with the women — Who were formerly mentioned as attending the cross of their Lord, and being early at the sepulchre on the day in which he arose; and Mary the mother of Jesus — Mentioned here the last time in the Scriptures; and with his brethren — His near kinsmen, who for some time did not believe; probably not till near, or even after, the time of his death.1:12-14 God can find hiding-places for his people. They made supplication. All God's people are praying people. It was now a time of trouble and danger with the disciples of Christ; but if any is afflicted, let him pray; that will silence cares and fears. They had now a great work to do, and before they entered upon it, they were earnest in prayer to God for his presence. They were waiting for the descent of the Spirit, and abounded in prayer. Those are in the best frame to receive spiritual blessings, who are in a praying frame. Christ had promised shortly to send the Holy Ghost; that promise was not to do away prayer, but to quicken and encourage it. A little company united in love, exemplary in their conduct, fervent in prayer, and wisely zealous to promote the cause of Christ, are likely to increase rapidly.Were come in - To Jerusalem.

They went up into an upper room - The word ὑπερῷον huperoōn, here translated "upper room," occurs only four times in the New Testament: Acts 9:37, "She (Dorcas) was sick and died; whom when they had washed, they laid her in an upper chamber" (see also Acts 9:39); Acts 20:8, "And there were many lights in the upper chamber where they were gathered together." The room so designated was an upper chamber used for devotion, or as a place where to lay the dead before burial, or occasionally for conversation, etc. Here it evidently means the place where they were assembled for devotion. Luke 24:53 says they were continually "in the temple" praising and blessing God; and some have supposed that the upper room here designated was one of the rooms in the temple. But there is no evidence of that, and it is not very probable. Such a room as that here referred to was a part of every house, especially in Jerusalem; and the disciples probably selected one where they might be together, and yet so retired that they might be safe from the Jews. The expression used in Luke 24:53, "They were continually - διαπαντός diapantos - in the temple," signifies no more than that this was a frequent or customary resort; they were always in the temple at the usual seasons of devotion, or they were in the constant habit of resorting thither. "Even DeWette allows that there is no discrepancy."

Where abode - Where were remaining. This does not mean that this was their permanent habitation; but they remained there waiting for the descent of the Holy Spirit.

Peter ... - All the apostles were there which Jesus had at first chosen except Judas, Luke 6:13-16.

13. went up into an upper room—perhaps the same "large upper room" where with their Lord they had celebrated the last Passover and the first Supper (Lu 22:12).

where abode—not lodged, but had for their place of rendezvous.

Peter, &c.—(See on [1934]Mt 10:2-4).

And when they were come in, to the city, and to the house,

they went up into an upper room; the same probably where they had kept the passover, and partook of the Lord’s supper; howsoever, for its largeness capable to receive so many.

Peter, as elder, and first called to the apostleship, is generally first named; and here especially his name is put first, and their names are repeated, to show, that though they fell in forsaking of Christ, they did rise again in professing of him; and that, notwithstanding their apostasy, they were continued after their recovery in their former office and dignity. "Into it", as the Arabic version reads; that is, into the city of Jerusalem, and into some house in that city; but what house it was is needless to inquire, since it cannot be known. Some think it was the house of John the Evangelist, whither he had taken Mary the mother of our Lord, John 19:27 which is not improbable: others, that it was the house of Mary, the mother of John Mark, where the disciples met for prayer when Peter was put into prison, Acts 12:12 others, that it was the house of Simon the leper; but his house was not at Jerusalem, but in Bethany, Matthew 26:6. Some have thought it was the house of Nicodemus, or of Joseph of Arimathea; but after all it seems most likely, that it was not any private house, but the temple into which the disciples immediately went, and where they continued; see Luke 24:52 and Acts 2:46.

they went up into an upper room; which, if in a private house, they might choose for retirement and secrecy; and might be the same in which they had eaten the passover; and so a Syriac scholiast, in manuscript, on the place, says it was the same. It was usual to meet in upper rooms for devotion and religious conversation; see Gill on Mark 2:4 though this upper room might be one of the chambers in the temple; for not only from the scriptural account of the temple, there were chambers round about it, and upper chambers; see 1 Kings 6:5 and one of these is called the chamber of Gemariah, in which Baruch read the prophecies of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 36:10 but also from the Jewish writings, in which frequent mention is made of the chamber Palhedrin, where the high priest was brought seven days before the day of atonement (c); and the chamber of the counsellors (d); and the chamber Gazith, where the sanhedrim sat; and the chamber of the house of Abtines (e); and the chamber of wood; and the chamber of the lepers; and the chamber of the house of oil (f); and the chamber of salt; and the chamber of Parvah; and the chamber of them that wash, besides others (g). And into a chamber, or upper room in the temple they might be let by Joses Barnabas, a Levite, one of their own company, Acts 4:36 who might have the care of it, for they are said to be continually in the temple, Luke 24:53.

Where abode both Peter, and James, and John. The Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Ethiopic versions read, "Peter, and John, and James"; and so the Alexandrian copy. These were the three favourite disciples of Christ, and are often mentioned together, as here first,

and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew. The Syriac and Ethiopic versions put Matthew before Bartholomew,

James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas, the brother of James; all the Oriental versions read, "Judas the son of James": of the names of the apostles; see Gill on Matthew 10:2, Matthew 10:3, Matthew 10:4. They are all here mentioned but Judas the betrayer, who was dead, to show, that though one had disbelieved the resurrection of Christ, another had denied him, and all of them had forsook him, and fled; yet they were got together again, and were firm and steadfast in the faith of Christ, waiting for the pouring forth of the Spirit,

(c) Misn. Yoma, c. 1. sect. 1.((d) T. Bab. Yoma, fol. 8. 2.((e) Ib. fol. 19. 1.((f) Misn. Middot, c. 2. sect. 5. (g) Ib. c. 5. sect. 2, 3.

{5} And when they were {i} come in, they went up into an upper room, where abode both Peter, and James, and John, and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas the brother of James.

(5) Ecclesiastical assemblies to hear the word, and to make common prayer, were first instituted and kept in private houses by the Apostles.

(i) They went into the house which the Church had chosen at that time to be a gathering place for the whole assembly.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
Acts 1:13-14. Εἰσῆλθον] not: into their place of meeting, as Beza and others hold, but, in accordance with what immediately precedes: into the city. The simple style of a continued narrative.

τὸ ὑπερῶον] עֲלִיָּה, the room directly under the flat roof, used for praying and for meetings (Hieros. Sotah, f. 24. 2). See Lightfoot, p. 11 f., and Vitringa, Synag. p. 145, and concerning the word generally, which is very common with classical writers and not a compound, see Valckenaer, Schol. p. 317 f.; Lobeck, Elem. I. p. 452 f. It is here to be conceived as in a private house, whose possessor was devoted to the gospel, and not with de Dieu, Lightfoot, Hammond, Schoettgen, and Krebs, as an upper room in the temple (on account of Luke 24:53; see on that passage), because, considering the hatred of the hierarchy, the temple could neither be desired by the followers of Jesus, nor permitted to them as a place for their special closed meetings. Perhaps it was the same room as in John 20:19; John 20:26.

οὗ ἦσαν καταμ.] where, i.e. in which they were wont to reside, which was the place of their common abode. The following ὅ τε Πέτρος κ.τ.λ. is a supplementary more exact statement of the subject of ἀνέβησαν. According to Acts, it is expressly the Eleven only, who were present at the ascension. In the Gospel, Luke 24:33 comp. Luke 1:36; Luke 1:44; Luke 1:50, the disciples of Emmaus and others are not excluded; but according to Mark 16:14, comp. Acts 1:15; Acts 1:19-20, it is likewise only the Eleven.

As to the list of the apostles, comp. on Matthew 10:2-4; Mark 3:17-18; Luke 6:14-16.

ὁ ζηλωτής] the (formerly) zealot. See on Matthew 10:4.

Ἰούδας Ἰακώβου] the relationship is arbitrarily defined as: brother of the (younger) James. It is: son of (an otherwise unknown) James. See on Luke 6:15; John 14:22; and Huther on Jude, Introd. § 1. Already the Syriac gives the correct rendering.

ὁμοθυμαδόν] denotes no mere external being-together; but, as Luther correctly renders it: unanimously. Comp. Dem. Phil. 4:147: ὁμοθυμαδὸν ἐκ μιᾶς γνώμης. So throughout in Acts and Romans 15:6.

σὺν γυναιξί] along with women; not: cum uxoribus (as Calvin holds);[101] they are partially known from the Gospels; Matthew 26:56; Matthew 26:61; Luke 8:2 f., Acts 24:10; Mark 15:40 f.

ΚΑῚ ΜΑΡΊᾼ] ΚΑΊ, also, singles out, after the mention in general terms, an individual belonging to the class as worthy of special remark. See Fritzsche, ad Marc. p. 11.

ἀδελφοῖς] The unbelief (John 7:5) of the four brothers-german of the Lord (see on Matthew 12:46; Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:3) was very probably overcome by His resurrection. Comp. on 1 Corinthians 15:7. Observe that here, besides the eleven apostles, two other classes are specified as assembled along with them (σὺνκαὶ σύν), namely (a), women, including the mother of Jesus; and (b) the brethren of Jesus. Among the latter, therefore, none of those eleven can be included. This in opposition to Lange, Hengstenberg, and older commentators. Comp. on John 7:3.

[101] See also Calovius and others, not uninterested in opposing celibacy.Acts 1:13. τὸ ὑπερῷον: “the upper chamber,” R.V., as of some well-known place, but there is no positive evidence to identify it with the room of the Last Supper, although here and in Mark 14:15, as also in Luke 22:12, the Vulgate has cœnaculum. Amongst recent writers Hilgenfeld and Feine see in this definite mention of a room well known to the readers a reference to the author’s first book, Luke 22:11-12. But the word used in St. Mark and in St. Luke’s Gospel is different from that in the passage before us—ἀνάγαιον, but here ὑπερῷον. If we identify the former with the κατάλυμα, Luke 22:11, it would denote rather the guest-chamber used for meals than the upper room or loft set apart for retirement or prayer, although sometimes used for supper or for assemblies (ὑπερῷον). Both words are found in classical Greek, but only the latter in the LXX, where it is frequent. In the N.T. it is used by St. Luke alone, and only in Acts. Holtzmann, following Lightfoot and Schöttgen, considers that an upper room in the Temple is meant, but this would be scarcely probable under the circumstances, and a meeting in a private house, Acts 2:46, Acts 4:23, Acts 5:42, is far more likely.—ὅ τε Π.: in a series of nouns embraced under one category only the first may have the article, Winer-Schmiedel, pp. 154–157. In comparing this list of the Apostles with that given by the Synoptists we notice that whilst St. Peter stands at the head in the four lists, those three are placed in the first group who out of the whole band are prominent in the Acts as also in the Gospels, viz., Peter, John, and James; all the Synoptists, however, place St. James as the elder brother before St. John. In St. Luke’s first list, as in St. Matthew’s list, the brothers Peter and Andrew stand first, followed by another pair of brothers James and John; but in Acts Andrew gives place, as we might expect, to the three Apostles who had been admitted to the closest intimacy with Jesus during His earthly life, and St. John as St. Peter’s constant companion in the Gospel narrative makes a pair with him. The list in Acts agrees with that given by St. Luke in his Gospel in two particulars (see Friedrich, ubi supra, p. 50, and so too Zeller): (1) Simon the Zealot is called not ὁ Καναναῖος, as in Matthew and Mark, but ὁ Ζηλωτής, cf. Luke 6:15; (2) instead of Thaddæus (or Lebbæus) we have “Judas of James,” cf. Luke 6:16.—Ἰούδας Ἰακώβου, “the son of James,” R.V. (so too above Ἰάκωβος Ἀλφαίου, “James the son of Alphæus”), placing the words “or, brother, see Judges 1:1,” in the margin, so too in Luke 6:16. The rendering of the words as Jude the brother of James was probably caused by Judges 1:1, and it is difficult to believe, as Nösgen argues (see also Winer-Schmiedel, p. 262), that in the same list and in such close proximity these two meanings “the son of” and “the brother of” should occur for the genitive, although no doubt it is possible grammatically; see Nösgen and Wendt, in loco. On the other hand, see Felten, note, p. 66. But Winer, to whom the latter refers, is by no means positive, and only expresses the opinion that ἀδελφός is perhaps to be supplied here and in Luke 6:16 if the same Apostle is referred to in Judges 1:1. (Winer-Moulton, p. 238). But the identification with the latter is very improbable, as he was most likely the brother of James, known as “the Lord’s brother” (see Plummer on Luke, Luke 6:16, and Salmon, Introduction to N. T., pp. 473, 474, fifth edit.). It is also noteworthy that St. Luke uses ἀδελφός where he means “brother,” cf. Luke 3:1; Luke 6:14; Acts 12:2. Blass, Grammatik des N. G., gives the same reference to Alciphr., ii., 2, as Winer, Τιμοκράτης ὁ Μητροδώρου, sc. ἀδελφός, but at the same time he declines to commit himself as to the passage in Acts and Luke 6. The list, it has been thought, is given here again by St. Luke to show the recovery of the Apostolic band from their denial and flight—so St. Chrysostom remarks that Luke did well to mention the disciples, for since one had betrayed Christ and another had been unbelieving, he hereby shows that, except the first, all were preserved (so to the same effect Œcumenius, in loco). There may also have been the desire of the author to intimate that although only the works of a few on the list would be chronicled, yet all alike were witnesses to Christ and workers for Him (Lumby).13. And when they were come in] i.e. into the city, from the open country where the Ascension had taken place.

they went up into an [the] upper room] Probably the upper room which has been mentioned before (Mark 14:15; Luke 22:12) as used by our Lord and His disciples for the passover feast. The Greek word in the Gospels is not the same as here, but in both cases it is evident that it was some room which could be spared by the occupiers and which was let or lent to the Galilæan band and their followers. The next words indicate die temporary occupancy, and would be better rendered where they were abiding, namely Peter, &c. The eleven were the tenants of the upper room, to which the other disciples resorted for conference and communion.

Peter, &c.] The names of the Apostles are again given, though they had been recorded for Theophilus in “the former treatise” (Luke 6:14-16), perhaps because it seemed fitting that the names of those who are now to be the leaders of the new teaching should be recited at the outset, that each one may be known to have taken his share in the labour, though it will not fall within the plan of the writer to give a notice of their several works; and secondly, as all the twelve had fled before the Crucifixion, this enumeration of them as again at their post, may shew that there had been in all of them, except Judas, only weakness of the flesh, and not unwillingness of the spirit.

It may be noticed that, whereas in the list of Apostles given in St Luke’s Gospel the name of Andrew stands second in the first group of four and next after Peter, in this repeated list Andrew is placed fourth. The history gives no reason for this change, but we see in the Gospels, when important events occurred in Christ’s ministry, such as the raising of the daughter of Jaïrus, the Transfiguration, and the Agony in Gethsemane, that the three disciples chosen to be present with Jesus are Peter, James and John, but not Andrew. Whatever may have been the reason for such an omission, the fact may in some degree explain the altered position of Andrew’s name in the list of the twelve. It appears no more in Holy Writ.

The order of the next group of four differs from their arrangement in the Gospel, but as none of them are mentioned after this verse there is nothing to explain the variation in order. In the next group the A. V. is inconsistent in rendering James the son of Alphæus, and afterwards a like construction by Judas the brother of James. It is more common to find this dependent genitive in descriptions of a son, though the relationship of brother to brother is found so indicated. Judas is called the brother of James here because it is assumed that he is the same person as the author of the Epistle of St Jude, who (Judges 1) calls himself brother of James. But as it is not certain that the writer of that Epistle was one of the twelve, it is better to render the two identical constructions standing so close together in the same way, and so to read Judas the son of James. James in that case would be the name of some otherwise unknown person, but it was a very common name among the Jews.

Simon Zelotes] called Simon the Canaanite (Matthew 10:4; Mark 3:18). The last-named title is a corruption of an Aramaic word of like meaning with the Greek Zelotes, and signifying Zealot, a name applied in our Lord’s time to those Jews who were most strict in their observance of the Mosaic ritual. Of this Simon we have no further mention in Scripture history.Acts 1:13. Ὑπερῷον) So the LXX. render עליה; Gregory says, “ὑπερῶα in the Scriptures were places in that part of the house which was farthest removed from the ground, set apart by the Jews for private prayer, looking towards the temple of Solomon or its site; which, on account of their consecration and suitable privacy, were used by the apostles for Christian purposes.”—Obs. ch. 3, where he describes at large ὑπερῷα.—Πέτρος, Peter) Construe this, etc., with ἀνέβησαν.[3] As to the order of the apostles, see on Matthew 10:2.[4] The article is added to Peter, rather than to the rest, as he was the foremost, ch. Acts 3:11, Acts 4:13; Acts 4:19, Acts 8:14; although not always so, ch. Acts 3:4. By means of these few and despised men, without any other human helps, Christ brought the world to the obedience of the faith.

[3] Not with ἦσαν καταμένοντες, as Engl. Vers. The commas should be after εἰσῆλθον, and after καταμένοντες, “when they were come in, Peter, etc., went up into an upper room, where they were abiding, or staying.”—E. and T.

[4] Thomas is in this list put above Bartholomew, below whom he is placed in Matthew, Mark, and Luke; also above Matthew, below whom he is placed in Mark and Luke. In Matthew, owing to the modesty of the Evangelist, Thomas is put before Matthew. The higher place given Thomas in Acts answers to the confirmation of his faith, John 20:27-28, which was subsequent to the time referred to, when the Evangelists mention him in their respective lists.—E. and T.Verse 13. - The upper chamber for an upper room, A.V.; where they were abiding for where abode, A.V.; son of James for brother of James, A.V. The upper chamber; perhaps the same room where they had eaten the Passover with Christ (Luke 22:12); but this is very uncertain, though affirmed by Epiphanius, and by Nicephorus, who further relates that the very house in which the upper chamber was built into the back part of the temple which the Empress Helena erected on Mount Sion. The word here is ὑπερῷον, there it is ἀνώγεον. The ὑπερῷον (Hebrew עֲליּהָ, 2 Kings 4:10, 11) was the room immediately under the roof; the ἀνώγεον was synonymous. Where they were abiding. A slight change in the order of the words, as adopted in the text of the R.V., makes Peter and the other apostles the nominative case to the verb "went up," instead of, as in the A.V., to "abode." In regard to the list of the apostles which follows, it may be noticed first, that it is identical with that of Luke 6:14-16, except in the omission of Judas Iscariot and the order in which the apostles are named. The order in Luke seems to have followed that of natural birth and association. The brothers, Peter and Andrew, James and John, are classed together; Philip and Bartholomew, or Nathanael, go together, and so on. But in this list John follows Peter, his close companion in missionary work (Acts 3:1, etc.; Acts 4:12; 8:14); James follows instead of preceding John; and others are classed somewhat differently, for reasons probably analogous, but which we know not. Of the other lists that in Mark 3:16-19 agrees most nearly with that before us. In all, Simon Peter stands first. The Jude of Luke 6:16 (comp. Jude 1:1) and Acts 1:13 is called Thaddaeus in Matthew 10:3 (" Lebbaeus whose surname was Thaddaeus," A.V.) and in Mark 3:18; but no doubt the persons are the same. In all the lists Philip stands fifth. In three Bartholomew is sixth, while in the list in Acts his being named after Thomas makes him seventh. In all the lists James the son of Alphaeus is ninth, and Judas Iscariot the last, except in the Acts, where he is not named, being already dead. The underwritten columns give the four lists in one view: - Matthew 10:2-5

1. Simon Peter

2. Andrew

3. James

4. John

5. Phillip

6. Bartholomew

7. Thomas

8. Matthew

9. James son of Alphaeus

10. Thaddaeus

11. Simon the Cananaean

12. Judas Iscariot Mark 3:16-19

1. Simon Peter

2. James

3. John

4. Andrew

5. Philip

6. Bartholomew

7. Matthew

8. Thomas

9. James son of Alphaeus

10. Thaddaeus

11. Simon the Cananaean

12. Judas Iscariot Luke 6:14-16

1. Simon Peter

2. Andrew

3. James

4. John

5. Philip

6. Bartholomew

7. Matthew

8. Thomas

9. James son of Alphaeus

10. Simon the Zealot

11. Judas, the son, or brother, of James

12. Judas Iscariot Acts 1:13

1. Simon Peter

2. John

3. James

4. Andrew

5. Philip

6. Thomas

7. Bartholomew

8. Matthew

9. James son of Alphaeus

10. Simon the Zealot

11. Jude, the son, or brother, of James An upper room (τὸ ὑπερῷον)

With the article, denoting some well-known place of resort. It was the name given to the room directly under the flat roof. Such rooms were often set apart as halls for meetings. In such an apartment Paul delivered his farewell address at Troas (Acts 20:8), and the body of Dorcas was laid (Acts 9:37). Used by Luke only.

Abode (ἦσαν καταμένοντες)

The participle and finite verb, denoting continuance or habitual residence. Hence more correctly, as Rev., "where they were abiding."

Links
Acts 1:13 Interlinear
Acts 1:13 Parallel Texts


Acts 1:13 NIV
Acts 1:13 NLT
Acts 1:13 ESV
Acts 1:13 NASB
Acts 1:13 KJV

Acts 1:13 Bible Apps
Acts 1:13 Parallel
Acts 1:13 Biblia Paralela
Acts 1:13 Chinese Bible
Acts 1:13 French Bible
Acts 1:13 German Bible

Bible Hub






Acts 1:12
Top of Page
Top of Page