Psalm 142:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
A maskil of David. When he was in the cave. A prayer. I cry aloud to the LORD; I lift up my voice to the LORD for mercy.

New Living Translation
A psalm of David, regarding his experience in the cave. A prayer. I cry out to the LORD; I plead for the LORD's mercy.

English Standard Version
A Maskil of David, when he was in the cave. A Prayer. With my voice I cry out to the LORD; with my voice I plead for mercy to the LORD.

New American Standard Bible
Maskil of David, when he was in the cave. A Prayer. I cry aloud with my voice to the LORD; I make supplication with my voice to the LORD.

King James Bible
Maschil of David; A Prayer when he was in the cave. I cried unto the LORD with my voice; with my voice unto the LORD did I make my supplication.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
A Davidic Maskil. When he was in the cave. A prayer. I cry aloud to the LORD; I plead aloud to the LORD for mercy.

International Standard Version
My voice cries out to the LORD; my voice pleads for mercy to the LORD.

NET Bible
A well-written song by David, when he was in the cave; a prayer. To the LORD I cry out; to the LORD I plead for mercy.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
With my voice to Lord Jehovah I cried; with my voice to Lord Jehovah I made supplication.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
[A [maskil] by David when he was in the cave; a prayer.] Loudly, I cry to the LORD. Loudly, I plead with the LORD for mercy.

Jubilee Bible 2000
I shall cry unto the LORD with my voice; with my voice shall I ask the LORD for mercy.

King James 2000 Bible
I cried unto the LORD with my voice; with my voice unto the LORD did I make my supplication.

American King James Version
I cried to the LORD with my voice; with my voice to the LORD did I make my supplication.

American Standard Version
I cry with my voice unto Jehovah; With my voice unto Jehovah do I make supplication.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Of understanding for David. A prayer when he was in the cave. [1 Kings 24]. I cried to the Lord with my voice: with my voice I made supplication to the Lord.

Darby Bible Translation
{An instruction of David; when he was in the cave: a prayer.} I cry unto Jehovah with my voice: with my voice unto Jehovah do I make supplication.

English Revised Version
Maschil of David, when he was in the cave; a Prayer. I cry with my voice unto the LORD; with my voice unto the LORD do I make supplication.

Webster's Bible Translation
Maschil of David; a prayer when he was in the cave. I cried to the LORD with my voice; with my voice to the LORD I made my supplication.

World English Bible
I cry with my voice to Yahweh. With my voice, I ask Yahweh for mercy.

Young's Literal Translation
An Instruction of David, a Prayer when he is in the cave. My voice is unto Jehovah, I cry, My voice is unto Jehovah, I entreat grace.
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

142:1-7 David's comfort in prayer. - There can be no situation so distressing or dangerous, in which faith will not get comfort from God by prayer. We are apt to show our troubles too much to ourselves, poring upon them, which does us no service; whereas, by showing them to God, we might cast the cares upon him who careth for us, and thereby ease ourselves. Nor should we allow any complaint to ourselves or others, which we cannot make to God. When our spirits are overwhelmed by distress, and filled with discouragement; when we see snares laid for us on every side, while we walk in his way, we may reflect with comfort that the Lord knoweth our path. Those who in sincerity take the Lord for their God, find him all-sufficient, as a Refuge, and as a Portion: every thing else is a refuge of lies, and a portion of no value. In this situation David prayed earnestly to God. We may apply it spiritually; the souls of believers are often straitened by doubts and fears. And it is then their duty and interest to beg of God to set them at liberty, that they may run the way of his commandments. Thus the Lord delivered David from his powerful persecutors, and dealt bountifully with him. Thus he raised the crucified Redeemer to the throne of glory, and made him Head over all things for his church. Thus the convinced sinner cries for help, and is brought to praise the Lord in the company of his redeemed people; and thus all believers will at length be delivered from this evil world, from sin and death, and praise their Saviour for ever.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 1. - I cried unto the Lord with my voice; with my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication. "With my voice" means aloud, and therefore earnestly and pressingly (comp. Psalm 3:4; Psalm 27:7; Psalm 64:1; Psalm 77:1; Psalm 130:1, 2, etc.).

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

I cried unto the Lord with my voice,.... With the voice of his soul, in the language of his mind, mentally, as Moses and Hannah cried unto the Lord when no voice was heard, or articulate sounds expressed, since this prayer was put up to the Lord in the cave where Saul was; though it might have been delivered before he came into it, while he and his men were at the mouth of it, which threw David into this distress; besides the cave was so large as to hold David and his six hundred men without being seen by Saul, and who could discourse together, as David and his men did, without being heard by Saul while he was in it; and so this psalm or prayer might be spoken vocally, though he was there;

with my voice unto the Lord did I make, my supplication: the same thing in other words; "crying" is explained by making "supplication", which is praying to the Lord in an humble manner for grace and mercy, and not pleading merit and worthiness.

The Treasury of David

1 I cried unto the Lord with my voice; with my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication.

2 I poured out my complaint before him; I shewed before him my trouble.

3 When my spirit was overwhelmed within me, then thou knewest my path. In the way wherein I walked have they privily laid a snare for me.

4 I looked on my right hand, and beheld, but there was no man that would know me: refuge failed me; no man cared for my soul.

5 I cried unto thee, O Lord, I said, Thou art my refuge and my portion in the land of the living.

6 Attend unto my cry, for I am brought very low: deliver me from my persecutors; for they are stronger than I.

7 Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy name: the righteous shall compass me about; for thou shalt deal bountifully with me.

Psalm 142:1

"I cried unto the Lord with my voice." It was a cry of such anguish that he remembers it long after, and makes a record of it. In the loneliness of the cave he could use his voice as much as he pleased; and therefore he made its gloomy vaults echo with his appeals to heaven. When there was no soul in the cavern seeking his blood, David with all his soul was engaged in seeking his God. He felt it a relief to his heart to use his voice in his pleadings with Jehovah. There was a voice in his prayer when he used his voice for prayer, it was not vox et praeterea nihil It was a prayer vivo corde as well as viv voce. "With my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication." He dwells upon the fact that he spoke aloud in prayer; it was evidently well impressed upon his memory, hence he doubles the word and says, "with my voice; with my voice." It is well when our supplications are such that we find pleasure in looking back upon them. He that is cheered by the memory of his prayers will pray again. See how the good man's appeal was to Jehovah only: he did not go round about to men, but he ran straight forward to Jehovah, his God. What true wisdom is here! Consider how the Psalmist's prayer grew into shape as he proceeded with it. He first poured out his natural longings, - "I cried;" and then he gathered up all his wits and arranged his thoughts, - "I made supplication." True prayers may differ in their diction, but not in their direction: an impromptu cry and a preconceived supplication must alike ascend towards the one prayer-hearing God, and he will accept each of them with equal readiness. The intense personality of the prayer is noteworthy: no doubt the Psalmist was glad of the prayers of others, but he was not content to be silent himself. See how everything is in the first person, - "I cried with my voice; with my voice did I make my supplication." It is good to pray in the plural - "Our Father," but in times of trouble we shall feel forced to change our note into "Let this cup pass from me."

Psalm 142:2

"I poured out my complaint before him." His inward meditation filled his soul: the bitter water rose up to the brim; what was to be done? He must pour out the wormwood and the gall, he could not keep it in; he lets it run away as best It can, that so his heart may be emptied of the fermenting mixture. But he took care where he outpoured his complaint, lest he should do mischief, or receive an ill return. If he poured it out before man he might only receive contempt from the proud, hard-heartedness from the careless, or pretended sympathy from the false; and therefore he resolved upon an outpouring before God alone, since he would pity and relieve. The word is scarcely "complaint"; but even if it be so we may learn from this text that our complaint must never be of a kind that we dare not bring before God. We may complain to God, but not of God. When we complain it should not be before men, but before God alone. "I shewed before him my trouble." He exhibited his griefs to one who could assuage them: he did not fall into the mistaken plan of so many who publish their sorrows to those who cannot help them. This verse is parallel with the first; David first pours out his complaint, letting it flow forth in a natural, spontaneous manner, and then afterwards he makes a more elaborate show of his affliction; just as in Psalm 142:1 he began with crying, and went on to "make supplication." Praying men pray better as they proceed. Note that we do not show our trouble before the Lord that he may see it, but that we may see him. It is for our relief, and not for his information that we make plain statements concerning our woes: it does us much good to set out our sorrow in order, for much of it vanishes in the process, like a ghost which will not abide the light of day; and the rest loses much of its terror, because the veil of mystery is removed by a clear and deliberate stating of the trying facts. Pour out your thoughts and you will see what they are; show your trouble and the extent of it will be known to you: let all be done before the Lord, for in comparison with his great majesty of love the trouble will seem to be as nothing.

Psalm 142:3

"When my spirit was overwhelmed within me, then thou knewest my path." The bravest spirit is sometimes sorely put to it. A heavy fog settles down upon the mind, and the man seems drowned and smothered in it; covered with a cloud, crushed with a lead, confused with difficulties, conquered by impossibilities. David was a hero, and yet his spirit sank: he could smite a giant down, but he could not keep himself up. He did not know his own path, nor feel able to bear his own burden. Observe his comfort: he looked away from his own condition to the ever-observant, all-knowing God; and solaced himself with the fact that all was known to his heavenly Friend. Truly it is well for us to know that God knows what we do not know. We lose our heads, but God never closes his eyes: our judgments lose their balance, but the eternal mind is always clear.

"In the way wherein I walked have they privily laid a snare for me." This the Lord knew at the time, and gave his servant warning of it. Looking back, the sweet singer is rejoiced that he had so gracious a Guardian, who kept him from unseen dangers. Nothing is hidden from God; no secret snare can hurt the man who dwells in the secret place of the Most High, for he shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. The use of concealed traps is disgraceful to our enemies, but they care little to what tricks they resort for their evil purposes. Wicked men must find some exercise for their malice, and therefore when they dare not openly assail they will privately ensnare. They watch the gracious man to see where his haunt is, and there they set their trap; but they do it with great caution, avoiding all observation, lest their victim being forewarned should escape their toils. This is a great trial, but the Lord is greater still, and makes us to walk safely in the midst of danger, for he knows us and our enemies, our way and the snare which is laid in it. Blessed be his name.

continued...

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

PSALM 142

Ps 142:1-7. Maschil—(See on [635]Ps 32:1, title). When he was in the cave—either of Adullam (1Sa 22:1), or En-gedi (1Sa 24:3). This does not mean that the Psalm was composed in the cave, but that the precarious mode of life, of which his refuge in caves was a striking illustration, occasioned the complaint, which constitutes the first part of the Psalm and furnishes the reason for the prayer with which it concludes, and which, as the prominent characteristic, gives its name.

1. with my voice—audibly, because earnestly.

Psalm 142:1 Additional Commentaries
Context
I Ask the Lord for Mercy
1Maskil of David, when he was in the cave. A Prayer. I cry aloud with my voice to the LORD; I make supplication with my voice to the LORD. 2I pour out my complaint before Him; I declare my trouble before Him.…
Cross References
1 Samuel 22:1
David left Gath and escaped to the cave of Adullam. When his brothers and his father's household heard about it, they went down to him there.

1 Samuel 24:3
He came to the sheep pens along the way; a cave was there, and Saul went in to relieve himself. David and his men were far back in the cave.

Psalm 24:3
Who may ascend the mountain of the LORD? Who may stand in his holy place?

Psalm 30:8
To you, LORD, I called; to the Lord I cried for mercy:

Psalm 77:1
For the director of music. For Jeduthun. Of Asaph. A psalm. I cried out to God for help; I cried out to God to hear me.
Treasury of Scripture

I cried to the LORD with my voice; with my voice to the LORD did I make my supplication.

A.M.

Psalm 32:1 Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.

Psalm 54:1 Save me, O God, by your name, and judge me by your strength.

Psalm 57:1 Be merciful to me, O God, be merciful to me: for my soul trusts in …

1 Chronicles 4:10 And Jabez called on the God of Israel, saying, Oh that you would …

A Prayer. David was twice in great peril in caves; on one occasion, in the cave of Adullam, when he fled from Achish king of Gath; and on another, in the cave of Engedi, where he had taken refuge from the pursuit of Saul. It is not certain to which of these events this Psalm refers; though probably to the former.

when he was

2 Samuel 22:1,2 And David spoke to the LORD the words of this song in the day that …

2 Samuel 24:3 And Joab said to the king, Now the LORD your God add to the people, …

Hebrews 11:38 (Of whom the world was not worthy:) they wandered in deserts, and …

with my voice

Psalm 28:2 Hear the voice of my supplications, when I cry to you, when I lift …

Psalm 77:1,2 I cried to God with my voice, even to God with my voice; and he gave …

Psalm 141:1 Lord, I cry to you: make haste to me; give ear to my voice, when I cry to you.

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