Acts 28:11
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
After three months we put out to sea in a ship that had wintered in the island--it was an Alexandrian ship with the figurehead of the twin gods Castor and Pollux.

New Living Translation
It was three months after the shipwreck that we set sail on another ship that had wintered at the island--an Alexandrian ship with the twin gods as its figurehead.

English Standard Version
After three months we set sail in a ship that had wintered in the island, a ship of Alexandria, with the twin gods as a figurehead.

Berean Study Bible
After three months we set sail in an Alexandrian ship that had wintered in the island. It had the Twin Brothers as a figurehead.

Berean Literal Bible
Then after three months, we sailed in an Alexandrian ship having wintered in the island, with a figurehead of the Dioscuri.

New American Standard Bible
At the end of three months we set sail on an Alexandrian ship which had wintered at the island, and which had the Twin Brothers for its figurehead.

King James Bible
And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose sign was Castor and Pollux.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
After three months we set sail in an Alexandrian ship that had wintered at the island, with the Twin Brothers as its figurehead.

International Standard Version
Three months later, we continued our sailing onboard an Alexandrian ship that had spent the winter at the island. It had the Twin Brothers as its figurehead.

NET Bible
After three months we put out to sea in an Alexandrian ship that had wintered at the island and had the "Heavenly Twins" as its figurehead.

New Heart English Bible
After three months, we set sail in a ship of Alexandria which had wintered in the island, whose sign was "The Twin Brothers."

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But we went out after three months and journeyed on an Alexandrian ship which had harbored at that island, and it had on it the sign of The Twins.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
After three months we sailed on an Alexandrian ship that had spent the winter at the island. The ship had the gods Castor and Pollux carved on its front.

New American Standard 1977
And at the end of three months we set sail on an Alexandrian ship which had wintered at the island, and which had the Twin Brothers for its figurehead.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose ensign was Castor and Pollux.

King James 2000 Bible
And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose sign was Castor and Pollux.

American King James Version
And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose sign was Castor and Pollux.

American Standard Version
And after three months we set sail in a ship of Alexandria which had wintered in the island, whose sign was The Twin Brothers.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And after three months, we sailed in a ship of Alexandria, that had wintered in the island, whose sign was the Castors.

Darby Bible Translation
And after three months we sailed in a ship which had wintered in the island, an Alexandrian, with [the] Dioscuri for its ensign.

English Revised Version
And after three months we set sail in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the island, whose sign was The Twin Brothers.

Webster's Bible Translation
And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose sign was Castor and Pollux.

Weymouth New Testament
Three months passed before we set sail in an Alexandrian vessel, called the 'Twin Brothers,' which had wintered at the island.

World English Bible
After three months, we set sail in a ship of Alexandria which had wintered in the island, whose sign was "The Twin Brothers."

Young's Literal Translation
And after three months, we set sail in a ship (that had wintered in the isle) of Alexandria, with the sign Dioscuri,
Study Bible
Paul Arrives in Italy
10The islanders honored us in many ways and supplied our needs when we were ready to sail. 11After three months we set sail in an Alexandrian ship that had wintered in the island. It had the Twin Brothers as a figurehead. 12Putting in at Syracuse, we stayed there three days.…
Cross References
Acts 13:6
They traveled through the whole island as far as Paphos, where they found a Jewish sorcerer and false prophet named Bar-Jesus,

Acts 27:6
There the centurion found an Alexandrian ship sailing for Italy, and he put us on board.

Acts 28:10
The islanders honored us in many ways and supplied our needs when we were ready to sail.

Acts 28:12
Putting in at Syracuse, we stayed there three days.
Treasury of Scripture

And after three months we departed in a ship of Alexandria, which had wintered in the isle, whose sign was Castor and Pollux.

Cir. A.M.

Acts 6:9 Then there arose certain of the synagogue, which is called the synagogue …

Acts 27:6 And there the centurion found a ship of Alexandria sailing into Italy; …

whose.

Isaiah 45:20 Assemble yourselves and come; draw near together, you that are escaped …

Jonah 1:5,16 Then the mariners were afraid, and cried every man to his god, and …

1 Corinthians 8:4 As concerning therefore the eating of those things that are offered …

(11) After three months.--The date may be approximately fixed. The Fast, falling on the 10th of Tisri, which has been calculated as falling in that year on September 24th, was passed, we are not told how long, when the ship left the Fair Havens (Acts 27:9). Then came the "fourteen days" of Acts 27:27, bringing us to the end of October or beginning of November. Three months from this carries us to the beginning of February. This was earlier than that usually fixed for the general navigation of the Mediterranean (see Note on Acts 27:9), but the officers and the crew of the Alexandrian ship were naturally anxious to take the earliest opportunity for pressing on to their destination. The fact that the latter had wintered in the island is obviously in favour of the identification of Melita with Malta, which lay on the usual line of the voyage from Alexandria to Italy, while Meleda was altogether out of the way.

Whose sign was Castor and Pollux.--Literally, the Dioscuri, the two sons of Zeus and Leda, who were regarded as the guardian deities of sailors. So Horace (Od. i. 3, 2) speaks of the "fratres Helen, lucida sidera" ("brothers of Helen, beaming stars"), and (Od. i. 12, 25) of the "puerosque Ledce" ("the children of Leda"), whose bright star shines propitiously on sailors. In Greek mythology, Zeus had rewarded their brotherly devotion by placing them among the stars as the Gemini, which were connected with the month of May in the signs of the Zodiac, and Poseidon (= Neptune) had given them power over the winds and waves that they might assist the shipwrecked. So in the Helena of Euripides they appear, in 155060, as promising a fair wind and a safe voyage. The figure-heads of the Greek and Roman ships were commonly placed both at the prow and the stern.

Verse 11. - Set sail for departed, A.V.; island for isle, A.V.; The Twin Brothers for Castor and Pollux, A.V. After three months. At the very earliest period when the sailing season began after the winter. It would be, perhaps, about the middle of February, or, as Alford thinks, about March 10. If the weather was fine, having so short a voyage before them, they would venture to sail without further delay. Set sail (see preceding verso, note). A ship of Alexandria. Some ship, better fated than that one (Acts 27:6) which was wrecked in St. Paul's Bay, which had weathered or avoided the gale, and probably got into the harbor of Valetta in good time. One would have thought that this ship wintering at Malta on its way from Alexandria to Italy, via Sicily, would be of itself a sufficient proof that Melita was Malta. Which had wintered (παρακεχειμακότι); see Acts 27:12, note. Whose sign was The Twin Brothers (Δίοσκουροι, Latin the constellation Gemini). The twin sons of Jupiter and Leda, Castor and Pollux, brothers of Helena ("fratres Helenis, lucida sidera," Horace, 'Od.,' 1:3, 2), were called by the Greeks Dioscuri, the sons of Jove. It was their special office to assist sailors in danger of shipwreck. Hence Horace, in the ode just quoted, prays that Castor and Pollux, in conjunction with other deities, would carry the ship in which Virgil sailed safe to Attica. And in Ode 12:27, etc., he describes the subsidence of the storm, and the calming of the waves, at the appearance of the twin stars, of Leda's sons. It was, therefore, very natural to have the Dioscuri for the παράσημον, the sign of the ship. Every ancient ship had a παράσημον, "a painted or carved representation of the sign which furnished its name on the prow, and at the stern a similar one of their tutelary deity." (Alford), which was called the tutela. These were sometimes the same, and perhaps were so in this instance. Ovid tells us that Minerva was the tutela of the ship in which he sailed, and that her painted helmet gave it its name ('Trist.,' 1 9:1), Galea, or the like. We may notice the continual trial to Jews and Christians of having to face idolatry in all the common actions of life. And after three months we departed,.... From Melita; here they stayed the three winter months, which were unseasonable for navigation; but now the spring coming on, and the weather agreeable, they left the island, and sailed

in a ship of Alexandria; See Gill on Acts 27:6;

which had wintered in the isle; perhaps all the said three months, for the same reason:

whose sign was Castor and Pollux; or Dioscuri, that is, the sons of Jupiter; for Castor and Pollux were his sons, by Leda: these are placed among the constellations in the Zodiac, and go by the name of Gemini, or the twins; and these were supposed to have a power of saving men in danger at sea: wherefore such as were about to go to sea, first paid their devoirs, and made vows to them; which they performed when they returned, and were delivered from shipwreck; and when they were in danger at sea, they used to pray unto them: the fiery exhalations that sometimes appear at sea, they took for them; and when only one appeared, it was looked on as a bad omen; but when both, it was reckoned to portend a prosperous voyage; hence they were considered as sea deities; and the Ethiopic version accordingly renders it here "Dioscoura", and adds, "who is the god of the mariners": now the images of these two brothers were sometimes set at the head, or forepart of the ship, as they were in this, from whence the ship took its name; as it is very common for the names of ships to be the same with the pictures or images that are placed at the head of them: whether the centurion chose this ship because of its sign, imagining there might be more safety in it, he having suffered shipwreck already; or whether this was the only one in the island, that was going for Italy, is not certain, nor very material: the Arabic version takes the word rendered Castor and Pollux, to be the name of a man, who was the owner of the ship; for it reads the words thus, "in a ship of Alexandria", that belonged "to a man of Alexandria, called Dioscorides". 11. we departed in a ship of Alexandria—(See on [2139]Ac 27:6).

which had wintered in the isle—no doubt driven m by the same storm which had wrecked on its shores the apostle's vessel—an incidental mark of consistency in the narrative.

whose sign—or "figurehead"; the figure, carved or painted on the bow, which gave name to the vessel. Such figureheads were anciently as common as now.

was Castor and Pollux—the tutelar gods of mariners, to whom all their good fortune was ascribed. St. Anthony is substituted for them in the modern superstitions of Mediterranean (Romanist) sailors. They carry his image in their boats and ships. It is highly improbable that two ships of Alexandra should have been casually found, of which the owners were able and willing to receive on board such a number of passengers (Ac 27:6). We may then reasonably conceive that it was compulsory on the owners to convey soldiers and state travellers [Webster and Wilkinson].28:11-16 The common events of travelling are seldom worthy of being told; but the comfort of communion with the saints, and kindness shown by friends, deserve particular mention. The Christians at Rome were so far from being ashamed of Paul, or afraid of owning him, because he was a prisoner, that they were the more careful to show him respect. He had great comfort in this. And if our friends are kind to us, God puts it into their hearts, and we must give him the glory. When we see those even in strange places, who bear Christ's name, fear God, and serve him, we should lift up our hearts to heaven in thanksgiving. How many great men have made their entry into Rome, crowned and in triumph, who really were plagues to the world! But here a good man makes his entry into Rome, chained as a poor captive, who was a greater blessing to the world than any other merely a man. Is not this enough to put us for ever out of conceit with worldly favour? This may encourage God's prisoners, that he can give them favour in the eyes of those that carry them captives. When God does not soon deliver his people out of bondage, yet makes it easy to them, or them easy under it, they have reason to be thankful.
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Alphabetical: a After Alexandrian an and At Brothers Castor end figurehead for gods had in island It its months of on out Pollux put sail sea set ship that the three to twin was we which wintered with

NT Apostles: Acts 28:11 After three months we set sail (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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