Acts 28:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Once safely on shore, we found out that the island was called Malta.

New Living Translation
Once we were safe on shore, we learned that we were on the island of Malta.

English Standard Version
After we were brought safely through, we then learned that the island was called Malta.

Berean Study Bible
Once we were safely ashore, we learned that the island was called Malta.

Berean Literal Bible
And having been saved, we then found out that the island is called Malta.

New American Standard Bible
When they had been brought safely through, then we found out that the island was called Malta.

King James Bible
And when they were escaped, then they knew that the island was called Melita.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Once ashore, we then learned that the island was called Malta.

International Standard Version
When we were safely on shore, we learned that the island was called Malta.

NET Bible
After we had safely reached shore, we learned that the island was called Malta.

New Heart English Bible
When we had escaped, then we learned that the island was called Malta.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And after this we learned that this island was called Melita.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When we were safely on shore, we found out that the island was called Malta.

New American Standard 1977
And when they had been brought safely through, then we found out that the island was called Malta.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And when they were escaped, then we knew that the island was called Melita. {or Malta}

King James 2000 Bible
And when they were escaped, then they knew that the island was called Malta.

American King James Version
And when they were escaped, then they knew that the island was called Melita.

American Standard Version
And when we were escaped, then we knew that the island was called Melita.

Douay-Rheims Bible
AND when we had escaped, then we knew that the island was called Melita. But the barbarians shewed us no small courtesy.

Darby Bible Translation
And when we got safe [to land] we then knew that the island was called Melita.

English Revised Version
And when we were escaped, then we knew that the island was called Melita.

Webster's Bible Translation
And when they had escaped, then they knew that the isle was called Melita.

Weymouth New Testament
Our lives having been thus preserved, we discovered that the island was called Malta.

World English Bible
When we had escaped, then they learned that the island was called Malta.

Young's Literal Translation
And having been saved, then they knew that the island is called Melita,
Study Bible
Ashore on Malta
1Once we were safely ashore, we learned that the island was called Malta. 2The islanders showed us extraordinary kindness. They kindled a fire and welcomed all of us because it was raining and cold.…
Cross References
Acts 13:6
They traveled through the whole island as far as Paphos, where they found a Jewish sorcerer and false prophet named Bar-Jesus,

Acts 27:1
When it was decided that we would sail for Italy, Paul and some other prisoners were handed over to a centurion named Julius, who belonged to the Augustan Regiment.

Acts 27:26
However, we must run aground on some island."

Acts 27:39
When daylight came, they did not recognize the land, but they sighted a bay with a sandy beach, where they decided to run the ship aground if they could.
Treasury of Scripture

And when they were escaped, then they knew that the island was called Melita.

the island.

Acts 27:26,44 However, we must be cast on a certain island…

XXVIII.

(1) Then they knew that the island was called Melita.--There is no ground for questioning the current belief that this was the modern Malta, It was the only island known as Melita by the Greeks and Romans. The gale, which had been blowing for fourteen days since the ship left Crete, would drive her in that direction. The local features of St. Paul's Bay agree closely, as has been seen, with the narrative in the Acts. There has from a very early date been a local tradition in favour of the belief. The Bay bears St. Paul's name. A cave is pointed out as having given him shelter. There has, however, been a rival claimant. In the Gulf of Venice, off the coast of Illyria, there is a small "island, Meleta (now Meleda), which has been identified by some writers with the scene of St. Paul's shipwreck. The view is first mentioned by Constantino Porphyrogenitus, a Greek writer of the tenth century, and was revived in the last century by Padre Georgi, an ecclesiastic of the island. There is, however, not a shadow of evidence in its favour, beyond the similarity (riot identity) of name, and the mention of Adria in Acts 27:27. It has been shown, however, that that term was used with far too wide a range to be decisive on such a question; and against the view there are the facts (1) that it would almost have required a miracle to get the ship, with a north-east gale blowing strongly, up to the Illyrian coast of the Gulf of Venice; (2) that a ship would not naturally have wintered on that coast on its way from Alexandria to Puteoli (Acts 28:11); (3) that there has been no local tradition in its favour, as at Malta. The island of Malta was originally a Phoenician colony. It came under the power of Carthage in B.C. 402, and was ceded to Rome in B.C. 242. Its temple, dedicated to Juno, was rich enough to be an object of plunder to Verres, the Prtor of Sicily (Cic. In Verr. vv. 46).

Verse 1. - We for they, A.V. and T.R. (twice). Was called. It reads as if it was the answer to their question to the natives, "What is this island called?" Melita. That Melita is the island of Malta, and not Meleda off the coast of Dalmatia, is demonstrated in Smith's ' Voyage and Shipwreck of St. Paul,' and it is not worth while here to consider the arguments in favor of Meleda. Melita appears to be a Phoenician name, from the root in Hebrew מָלַט, to escape (Bochart, 'Canaan,' 1:26), meaning, therefore, a "refuge," a harbor of refuge so called from sailors often running into Valetta during a gale; or possibly from מֶלֶ, clay, in Italian malta, from the clay which forms the bottom of the sea as you approach Malta, and which makes the anchorage so safe. It was originally colonized by Phoenicians, whether from Tyre or Carthage cannot be pronounced with certainty, though we know it was a Carthaginian possession at the time of the first Punic War. It fell into the hands of the Romans B.C. 218, and at the time of St. Paul's shipwreck was annexed to the province of Sicily. The population, however, was Phoenician or Punic, and probably knew little Greek or Latin. The name of a fountain in St. Paul's Bay, Ayn tal Razzul, "The Apostle's Fountain," is said (Smith, p. 24) to be Phoenician. But this is extremely doubtful. It is far more probably, not to say certainly, the corrupt Africano-Arabic dialect of the island, as I venture to affirm on the high authority of Professor Wright. Gesenius is also distinctly of opinion that there are no remains of Phoenician in the Maltese, and that all the words in the Maltese language which have been thought to be Phoenician are really Arabic. Four genuine Phoenician inscriptions have, however, been found in the island ('Monument. Phoenic,' pars prima, pp. 90-111,252, and 341). And when they were escaped,.... From the danger they were exposed to by shipwreck, and were got safe to land; this is omitted in the Syriac version:

then they knew that the island was called Melita; an island toward the African shore, where it is placed both by Pliny (g), and Ptolomy (h); in which, the latter says, was the city Melita: it lies between Sicily and Tripolis of Barbary, and is now called Malta: it was famous for the knights of Rhodes, which are now called the knights of Malta: it has its name from "to escape", it being formerly a refuge to the Phoenicians, especially in stormy weather, in their long voyage from Tyre to Gades; and was indeed a place of escape to the Apostle Paul, and those that were with him. And perhaps it might be so called from its being a refuge for pirates; for Cicero (i) says, here pirates used to winter almost every year, and yet did not spoil the temple of Juno, as Verres did: though some say it was so called from the great abundance of honey found in it; for it was a very pleasant and fruitful island, bringing forth great plenty of wheat, rye, flax, cummin, cotton, figs, wine, roses, thyme, lavender, and many other sweet and delightful herbs, from whence bees did gather great plenty of honey. It was, according to Pliny, distant from Camerina eighty four miles, and from Lilybaeum a hundred and thirteen; and it is said to be distant from the promontory of Sicily an hundred miles, though others say sixty; and that it was so far from Syracuse, which is the next place the apostle came to in this voyage, was from Africa an hundred and ninety miles. On the east side, a little from the chief city of it, now called Malta, was a famous temple of Juno, spoiled by Verres, as before observed; and on the south side another of Hercules, the ruins of both which are yet to be seen. The compass of the island is about sixty miles, the length twenty, and the breadth twelve, and has in it five ports, and about sixty villages.

(g) Nat. Hist. l 3. c. 8. (h) Geograph. l. 4. c. 3.((i) Orat. 9. in Verrem, c. 17. CHAPTER 28

Ac 28:1-31. The Wintering at Malta, and Notable Occurrences There—Prosecution of the Voyage to Italy as Far as Puteoli, and Land Journey Thence to Rome—Summary of the Apostle's Labors There for the Two Following Years.

1. knew the island was called Melita—(See on [2137]Ac 27:39). The opinion that this island was not Malta to the south of Sicily, but Meleda in the Gulf of Venice—which till lately had respectable support among Competent judges—is now all but exploded; examination of all the places on the spot, and of all writings and principles bearing on the question, by gentlemen of the highest qualification, particularly Smith (see on [2138]Ac 27:41), having set the question, it may now be affirmed, at rest.28:1-10 God can make strangers to be friends; friends in distress. Those who are despised for homely manners, are often more friendly than the more polished; and the conduct of heathens, or persons called barbarians, condemns many in civilized nations, professing to be Christians. The people thought that Paul was a murderer, and that the viper was sent by Divine justice, to be the avenger of blood. They knew that there is a God who governs the world, so that things do not come to pass by chance, no, not the smallest event, but all by Divine direction; and that evil pursues sinners; that there are good works which God will reward, and wicked works which he will punish. Also, that murder is a dreadful crime, one which shall not long go unpunished. But they thought all wicked people were punished in this life. Though some are made examples in this world, to prove that there is a God and a Providence, yet many are left unpunished, to prove that there is a judgment to come. They also thought all who were remarkably afflicted in this life were wicked people. Divine revelation sets this matter in a true light. Good men often are greatly afflicted in this life, for the trial and increase of their faith and patience. Observe Paul's deliverance from the danger. And thus in the strength of the grace of Christ, believers shake off the temptations of Satan, with holy resolution. When we despise the censures and reproaches of men, and look upon them with holy contempt, having the testimony of our consciences for us, then, like Paul, we shake off the viper into the fire. It does us no harm, except we are kept by it from our duty. God hereby made Paul remarkable among these people, and so made way for the receiving of the gospel. The Lord raises up friends for his people in every place whither he leads them, and makes them blessings to those in affliction.
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NT Apostles: Acts 28:1 When we had escaped then they learned (Acts of the Apostles Ac) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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