Acts 27:14
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Before very long, a wind of hurricane force, called the Northeaster, swept down from the island.

New Living Translation
But the weather changed abruptly, and a wind of typhoon strength (called a "northeaster") burst across the island and blew us out to sea.

English Standard Version
But soon a tempestuous wind, called the northeaster, struck down from the land.

New American Standard Bible
But before very long there rushed down from the land a violent wind, called Euraquilo;

King James Bible
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
But not long afterward, a fierce wind called the "northeaster" rushed down from the island.

International Standard Version
But it was not long before a violent wind (called a northeaster) swept down from the island.

NET Bible
Not long after this, a hurricane-force wind called the northeaster blew down from the island.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And after a little while, the wind of a hurricane came upon us called “Typhoniqos Euroqlydon”.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Soon a powerful wind (called a northeaster) blew from the island.

Jubilee Bible 2000
But not long after, there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon. {devastating cold north wind from Europe}

King James 2000 Bible
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

American King James Version
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

American Standard Version
But after no long time there beat down from it a tempestuous wind, which is called Euraquilo:

Douay-Rheims Bible
But not long after, there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroaquilo.

Darby Bible Translation
But not long after there came down it a hurricane called Euroclydon.

English Revised Version
But after no long time there beat down from it a tempestuous wind, which is called Euraquilo:

Webster's Bible Translation
But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

Weymouth New Testament
But it was not long before a furious north-east wind, coming down from the mountains, burst upon us and carried the ship out of her course.

World English Bible
But before long, a stormy wind beat down from shore, which is called Euroclydon.

Young's Literal Translation
and not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, that is called Euroclydon,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

27:12-20 Those who launch forth on the ocean of this world, with a fair gale, know not what storms they may meet with; and therefore must not easily take it for granted that they have obtained their purpose. Let us never expect to be quite safe till we enter heaven. They saw neither sun nor stars for many days. Thus melancholy sometimes is the condition of the people of God as to their spiritual matters; they walk in darkness, and have no light. See what the wealth of this world is: though coveted as a blessing, the time may come when it will be a burden; not only too heavy to be carried safely, but heavy enough to sink him that has it. The children of this world can be prodigal of their goods for the saving their lives, yet are sparing of them in works of piety and charity, and in suffering for Christ. Any man will rather make shipwreck of his goods than of his life; but many rather make shipwreck of faith and a good conscience, than of their goods. The means the sailors used did not succeed; but when sinners give up all hope of saving themselves, they are prepared to understand God's word, and to trust in his mercy through Jesus Christ.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 14. - After no long time for not long after, A.V.; beat down from for arose against, A.V.; which is called Euraquilo for called Euroclydon, A.V. and T.B. There beat down from it (ἔβαλε κατ αὐτῆς). The meaning of this somewhat difficult phrase clearly is that given by Alford and Howson, and, on second thoughts, by Smith, viz. that a violent squall from the north-east beat down the heights and through the valleys of the island, becoming more violent when they had passed Cape Matala, and compelled them to alter their course, and run south-west before the wind towards the island of Clauda; ἔβαλεν in a neuter sense, "struck," or "beat," or "fell," as in Homer (see Liddell and Scott). Κατ αὐτῆς. Farrar thinks it "certain" that the right rendering is "against her," viz. the ship, because ἔβαλεν could not be used with nothing to follow it," 1.e. he thinks you must say ἔβαλεν κατὰ something. But as πλοῖον is the word used for the ship, not ναῦς, it seems very difficult to suppose that Luke could say αὐτῆς, and not αὐτοῦ. It is better, therefore, to refer ἀὐτῆς to Κρήτη, and either to understand it "down it," like κατ Οὐλύμποιο καρήνων, "down the heights of Olympus;" κατὰ πέτρης, "down the rock," etc., or simply "against it," as in the A.V., which obviates Dr. Farrar's objection. If taken in the sense of "down" there is the same idea of a squall "rushing down" from the hills into the lake, in Luke 8:23; and again in ver. 33 of the same chapter St. Luke tells us how the swine rushed κατὰ τοῦ κρημνοῦ, "down the steep," into the lake. A tempestuous wind; ἄνεμος τυφωνικός, only here, and not found in Greek writers; but the substantive τυφώς τυφῶνος, is common for a "furious storm" or "whirlwind." Euraquilo. Compounded - after the analogy of Euronotus, the south-east wind - of Eurus, the east wind, and Aquilo, the north wind, both Latin words (like Corns, in ver. 12), though Eurus is also Greek. This reading of the R.T. is supported by the Vulgate, and by "Lachmann, Bornemann, Ewald, J. Smith, Hackett, Bentley, Olshausen, after Erasmus, Grotius, Mill, Bengel, and others" (Meyer), and by Wordsworth, Alford, Lid-dell and Scott, Factor. On the other hand, Meyer, Tischendorf, Dean Howson, and others support the reading of the T.R. Αὐροκλύδων, and Lewis is doubtful. The derivation of Euroelydon would be from Αῦρος, and κλύδων, a wave. Whatever its name was, it must have been a north-easter. Psalm evil. 25 naturally arises to one's remembrance, with its fine description of a storm at sea.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

But not long after,.... They had not been long at sea, but

there arose against it; the ship, or the island of Crete, or both:

a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon; in the Greek text it is a "Typhonic" wind, so called, not from the name of a country from whence it blew; rather from Typho, the same with Python, an Heathen deity, who is said to be drowned in the lake Serbonis, or in the river Orontes; about which places this sort of wind is observed to be frequent, and which may take its name from him, being supposed to be raised by him. This wind may very well be thought to be the same which is called Typhon, and is by writers (s) represented as a very tempestuous one, as a sort of whirlwind or hurricane, a violent storm, though without thunder and lightning; and Pliny (t) calls it the chief plague of sailors, it breaking their sails, and even their vessels to pieces: and this may still have its name from Typho, since the Egyptians used to call everything that is pernicious and hurtful by this name; moreover, this wind is also called "Euroclydon". The Alexandrian copy reads, "Euracylon", and so the Vulgate Latin version seems to have read, rendering it "Euro-aquilo, the north east wind". The Ethiopic version renders it, the "north wind"; but according to Aristotle (u), and Pliny (w) the wind Typhon never blew in the northern parts; though some think that wind is not meant here, since the Typhon is a sudden storm of wind, and soon over; whereas this storm of wind was a settled and lasting one, it continued many days; and that it is only called Typhonic, because it bore some likeness to it, being very blustering and tempestuous: it seems by its name to be an easterly wind, which blew very violently, ploughed the sea, and lifted up its waves; hence the Arabic version renders it, "a mover" or "stirrer up of the waves"; which beat against the ship in a violent manner, and exposed it to great danger.

(s) Aristotel. Meteorolog. l. 3. c. 1. Apaleius de Mundo, p. 266. (t) Nat. Hist. l. 2. c. 48. (u) Ut supra. (Aristotel. Meteorolog. l. 3. c. 1.) (w) lb. c. 49.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

14, 15. a tempestuous—"typhonic"

wind—that is, like a typhon or tornado, causing a whirling of the clouds, owing to the meeting of opposite currents of air.

called Euroclydon—The true reading appears to be Euro-aquilo, or east-northeast, which answers all the effects here ascribed to it.

Acts 27:14 Additional Commentaries
Context
The Storm at Sea
13When a moderate south wind came up, supposing that they had attained their purpose, they weighed anchor and began sailing along Crete, close inshore. 14But before very long there rushed down from the land a violent wind, called Euraquilo; 15and when the ship was caught in it and could not face the wind, we gave way to it and let ourselves be driven along.…
Cross References
Ezekiel 27:26
Your oarsmen take you out to the high seas. But the east wind will break you to pieces far out at sea.

Mark 4:37
A furious squall came up, and the waves broke over the boat, so that it was nearly swamped.

Acts 27:15
The ship was caught by the storm and could not head into the wind; so we gave way to it and were driven along.
Treasury of Scripture

But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

not.

Exodus 14:21-27 And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the LORD caused …

Jonah 1:3-5 But Jonah rose up to flee to Tarshish from the presence of the LORD, …

arose, or beat. a tempestuous.

Psalm 107:25-27 For he commands, and raises the stormy wind, which lifts up the waves thereof…

Ezekiel 27:26 Your rowers have brought you into great waters: the east wind has …

Matthew 8:24 And, behold, there arose a great tempest in the sea, so that the …

Mark 4:37 And there arose a great storm of wind, and the waves beat into the …

Euroclydon. Probably, as Dr. Shaw supposes, one of those tempestuous winds called levanters, which blow in all directions, from N.E. round by E. to S.E.

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