Jonah 1:13
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Instead, the men did their best to row back to land. But they could not, for the sea grew even wilder than before.

New Living Translation
Instead, the sailors rowed even harder to get the ship to the land. But the stormy sea was too violent for them, and they couldn't make it.

English Standard Version
Nevertheless, the men rowed hard to get back to dry land, but they could not, for the sea grew more and more tempestuous against them.

New American Standard Bible
However, the men rowed desperately to return to land but they could not, for the sea was becoming even stormier against them.

King James Bible
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the land; but they could not: for the sea wrought, and was tempestuous against them.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Nevertheless, the men rowed hard to get back to dry land, but they couldn't because the sea was raging against them more and more.

International Standard Version
Even so, the crewmen rowed hard to bring the ship toward dry land, but they were unsuccessful, because the sea was growing more and more stormy.

NET Bible
Instead, they tried to row back to land, but they were not able to do so because the storm kept growing worse and worse.

New Heart English Bible
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to get them back to the land; but they could not, for the sea grew more and more stormy against them.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Instead, the men tried to row harder to get the ship back to shore, but they couldn't do it. The storm was getting worse.

JPS Tanakh 1917
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the land; but they could not; for the sea grew more and more tempestuous against them.

New American Standard 1977
However, the men rowed desperately to return to land but they could not, for the sea was becoming even stormier against them.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to turn the ship to land, but they could not; for the sea rose higher and was wroth against them.

King James 2000 Bible
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the land; but they could not: for the sea raged, and was tempestuous against them.

American King James Version
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the land; but they could not: for the sea worked, and was tempestuous against them.

American Standard Version
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to get them back to the land; but they could not: for the sea grew more and more tempestuous against them.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And the men rowed hard to return to land, but they were not able: because the sea tossed and swelled upon them.

Darby Bible Translation
But the men rowed hard to regain the land; but they could not; for the sea grew more and more tempestuous against them.

English Revised Version
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to get them back to the land; but they could not: for the sea grew more and more tempestuous against them.

Webster's Bible Translation
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the land; but they could not: for the sea wrought, and was tempestuous against them.

World English Bible
Nevertheless the men rowed hard to get them back to the land; but they could not, for the sea grew more and more stormy against them.

Young's Literal Translation
And the men row to turn back unto the dry land, and are not able, for the sea is more and more tempestuous against them.
Study Bible
Jonah Cast Into the Sea and Swallowed
12He said to them, "Pick me up and throw me into the sea. Then the sea will become calm for you, for I know that on account of me this great storm has come upon you." 13However, the men rowed desperately to return to land but they could not, for the sea was becoming even stormier against them. 14Then they called on the LORD and said, "We earnestly pray, O LORD, do not let us perish on account of this man's life and do not put innocent blood on us; for You, O LORD, have done as You have pleased."…
Cross References
Jonah 1:12
He said to them, "Pick me up and throw me into the sea. Then the sea will become calm for you, for I know that on account of me this great storm has come upon you."

Jonah 1:14
Then they called on the LORD and said, "We earnestly pray, O LORD, do not let us perish on account of this man's life and do not put innocent blood on us; for You, O LORD, have done as You have pleased."
Treasury of Scripture

Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the land; but they could not: for the sea worked, and was tempestuous against them.

Nevertheless the. There was great humanity and tender feeling in these men. They were probably affected deeply with the candid confession, the disinterested, submissive conduct of the disobedient prophet, and were unwilling to cast him into the deep, until they found that every effort to save themselves was in vain.

rowed. Heb. digged. but.

Job 34:29 When he gives quietness, who then can make trouble? and when he hides …

Proverbs 21:30 There is no wisdom nor understanding nor counsel against the LORD.

(13) Rowed hard.--This is a sufficient rendering of the Hebrew verb, though it misses the metaphor. In every other instance of its use the word refers to the violence employed in breaking through a wall or enclosure. (See Ezekiel 8:8; Ezekiel 12:5; Ezekiel 12:7; Job 24:16; Amos 9:2; and compare the use of the derivative noun in Exodus 22:2; Jeremiah 2:34.) The figure of forcing the ship through the great wave wall is very striking. The Latin infindere sulcos and our ploughing the main are kindred metaphors.

It is a fine trait in these sailors that they will not obey the prophet's request to throw him overboard till all efforts to save the ship have been tried.

Verse 13. - The generous sailors, however, are loth to execute this sentence on a prophet of the Lord, and make a supreme effort to reach the land, and thus obviate this severe alternative. Rowed hard; literally, digged (Job 24:16; Ezekiel 12:7); Septuagint, παρεβιάζοντο, "used violent efforts." They endeavoured to force their way through the waves with oars, as the use of sails was impracticable. The expression is like the classical phrases, infindere sulcos, scindere freta, arare aquas, and our "to plough the main." To the land; to get them back to land. The wind was off shore, and they had taken down the sails, and tried to row back to the harbour. Τοῦ ἐπιτρέψαι πρὸς τὴν γῆν, "to return to the land" (Septuagint). The sea wrought (see note on ver. 11). Nevertheless, the men rowed hard to bring it to the land,

but they could not,.... Or, "they digged" (l); that is, the waters of the sea with their oars; not by casting anchor, as Abendana; they used all their skill and exerted all their strength; they laboured with all their might and main, as a man digs in a pit; they ploughed the ocean, and furrowed the sea, as the Latins speak, but all in vain; they rowed against wind and tide; God, his purposes and providence, were against them; and it was not possible for them to make land, and get the ship ashore, which they were desirous of, to save the life of Jonah, as well as their own; for, seeing him penitent, they had compassion on him; his character and profession as a prophet, the gravity of the man, the sedateness of his countenance, his openness of mind, and his willingness to die, wrought greatly upon the men, that they would fain have saved him if they could; and perhaps being Heathens, and not knowing thoroughly the nature of his offence, might think he did not deserve to die; but all their endeavours to save him were to no purpose:

for the sea wrought, and was tempestuous against them; it grew more and more so; the storm beat right against them, and drove them back faster than they came; so that it was impossible to stand against it.

(l) "et fodiebant", Montanus, Calvin, Piscator, Tarnovius; "foderunt", Vatablus, Liveleus. 13. they could not—(Pr 21:30). Wind and tide—God's displeasure and God's counsel—were against them.1:13-17 The mariners rowed against wind and tide, the wind of God's displeasure, the tide of his counsel; but it is in vain to think of saving ourselves any other way than by destroying our sins. Even natural conscience cannot but dread blood-guiltiness. And when we are led by Providence God does what he pleases, and we ought to be satisfied, though it may not please us. Throwing Jonah into the sea put an end to the storm. God will not afflict for ever, He will only contend till we submit and turn from our sins. Surely these heathen mariners will rise up in judgment against many called Christians, who neither offer prayers when in distress, nor thanksgiving for signal deliverances. The Lord commands all creatures, and can make any of them serve his designs of mercy to his people. Let us see this salvation of the Lord, and admire his power, that he could thus save a drowning man, and his pity, that he would thus save one who was running from him, and had offended him. It was of the Lord's mercies that Jonah was not consumed. Jonah was alive in the fish three days and nights: to nature this was impossible, but to the God of nature all things are possible. Jonah, by this miraculous preservation, was made a type of Christ; as our blessed Lord himself declared, Mt 12:40.
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Alphabetical: against back becoming before best But could desperately did even for grew However Instead land men not return row rowed sea stormier than the their them they to was wilder

OT Prophets: Jonah 1:13 Nevertheless the men rowed hard to get (Jon. Jh) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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