Psalm 44:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
For the director of music. Of the Sons of Korah. A maskil. We have heard it with our ears, O God; our ancestors have told us what you did in their days, in days long ago.

New Living Translation
For the choir director: A psalm of the descendants of Korah. O God, we have heard it with our own ears--our ancestors have told us of all you did in their day, in days long ago:

English Standard Version
O God, we have heard with our ears, our fathers have told us, what deeds you performed in their days, in the days of old:

Berean Study Bible
For the choirmaster. A Maskil of the sons of Korah. We have heard with our ears, O God; our fathers have told us the work You did in their days, in days of long ago.

New American Standard Bible
For the choir director. A Maskil of the sons of Korah. O God, we have heard with our ears, Our fathers have told us The work that You did in their days, In the days of old.

King James Bible
To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, Maschil. We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old.

Christian Standard Bible
God, we have heard with our ears--our ancestors have told us--the work you accomplished in their days, in days long ago:

Contemporary English Version
Our God, our ancestors told us what wonders you worked and we listened carefully.

Good News Translation
With our own ears we have heard it, O God--our ancestors have told us about it, about the great things you did in their time, in the days of long ago:

Holman Christian Standard Bible
For the choir director. A Maskil of the sons of Korah. God, we have heard with our ears-- our ancestors have told us-- the work You accomplished in their days, in days long ago:

International Standard Version
God, we heard it with our ears; our ancestors told us about what you did in their day— a long time ago.

NET Bible
For the music director; by the Korahites, a well-written song. O God, we have clearly heard; our ancestors have told us what you did in their days, in ancient times.

New Heart English Bible
[For the Chief Musician. By the sons of Korah. A contemplative psalm.] We have heard with our ears, God; our fathers have told us, what work you did in their days, in the days of old.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Oh God, we have heard with our ears, also our fathers related to us what you did in their days, in the former days:

GOD'S WORD® Translation
[For the choir director; a [maskil] by Korah's descendants.] O God, we have heard it with our own ears. Our ancestors have told us about the miracle you performed in their day, in days long ago.

JPS Tanakh 1917
For the Leader; [a Psalm] of the sons of Korah. Maschil. O God, we have heard with our ears, our fathers have told us; A work Thou didst in their days, in the days of old.

New American Standard 1977
O God, we have heard with our ears, Our fathers have told us, The work that Thou didst in their days, In the days of old.

Jubilee Bible 2000
We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days in the times of old.

King James 2000 Bible
We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work you did in their days, in the times of old.

American King James Version
We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work you did in their days, in the times of old.

American Standard Version
We have heard with our ears, O God, Our fathers have told us, What work thou didst in their days, In the days of old.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Unto the end, for the sons of Core, to give understanding. We have heard, O God, with our ears : our fathers have declared to us, The work, thou hast wrought in their days, and in the days of old.

Darby Bible Translation
{To the chief Musician. Of the sons of Korah. An instruction.} O God, with our ears have we heard, our fathers have told us, the work thou wroughtest in their days, in the days of old:

English Revised Version
For the Chief Musician; a Psalm of the sons of Korah. Maschil. We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the days of old.

Webster's Bible Translation
To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, Maschil. We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old.

World English Bible
We have heard with our ears, God; our fathers have told us, what work you did in their days, in the days of old.

Young's Literal Translation
To the Overseer. -- By sons of Korah. An Instruction. O God, with our ears we have heard, Our fathers have recounted to us, The work Thou didst work in their days, In the days of old.
Study Bible
Redeem Us
1For the choirmaster. A Maskil of the sons of Korah. We have heard with our ears, O God; our fathers have told us the work You did in their days, in days of long ago. 2With Your hand You drove out the nations and planted our fathers there; You crushed the peoples and cast them out.…
Cross References
Exodus 10:2
and that you may tell your children and grandchildren how severely I dealt with the Egyptians when I performed miraculous signs among them, so that you may know that I am the LORD."

Exodus 12:26
When your children ask you, 'What does this service mean to you?'

Exodus 12:27
you are to reply, 'It is the Passover sacrifice to the LORD, who passed over the houses of the Israelites in Egypt when He struck down the Egyptians and spared our homes.'" Then the people bowed down and worshiped.

Exodus 13:8
And on that day you are to explain to your son, 'This is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egypt.'

Deuteronomy 6:20
In the future, when your son asks you, "What is the meaning of the decrees and statutes and ordinances the LORD our God has commanded you?"

Deuteronomy 32:7
Remember the days of old; consider the years long past. Ask your father, and he will tell you, your elders, and they will inform you.

Judges 6:13
"Pardon me, Sir," Gideon replied, "but if the LORD is with us, why has all this happened to us? And where are all His wonders about which our fathers told us, saying, 'Has not the LORD brought us up out of Egypt?' But now the LORD has forsaken us and delivered us into the hand of Midian."

2 Samuel 7:22
How great You are, O Lord GOD! For there is none like You, and there is no God besides You, according to everything we have heard with our own ears.

Psalm 75:1
For the choirmaster: To the tune of "Do not Destroy." A Psalm of Asaph. A Song. We give thanks to You, O God; we give thanks, for Your name is near. The people declare Your wondrous works.

Psalm 77:5
I considered days of old, years long in the past.

Psalm 78:3
that we have heard and known and our fathers have relayed to us.

Psalm 78:12
He worked wonders before their fathers in the land of Egypt, in the region of Zoan.

Psalm 90:16
May Your work be shown to Your servants, and Your splendor to their children.

Isaiah 51:9
Awaken, awaken, put on strength, O arm of the LORD. Wake up as in days past, as in generations of long ago. Was it not You who cut Rahab to pieces, who pierced through the dragon?

Isaiah 63:9
In all their distress, He too was afflicted, and the Angel of His Presence saved them. In His love and compassion He redeemed them; He lifted them up and carried them all the days of old.

Jeremiah 21:2
"Please inquire of the LORD on our behalf, since Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon is waging war against us. Perhaps the LORD will perform for us something like all His past wonders, so that Nebuchadnezzar will withdraw from us."

Habakkuk 3:2
O LORD, I have heard the report of You; I stand in awe, O LORD, of Your deeds. Revive them in these years; make them known in these years. In Your wrath, remember mercy!

Treasury of Scripture

We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work you did in their days, in the times of old.

A.M.

Psalm 42:1 As the hart pants after the water brooks, so pants my soul after you, O God.

have heard

Psalm 22:31 They shall come, and shall declare his righteousness to a people …

Psalm 71:18 Now also when I am old and gray headed, O God, forsake me not; until …

Psalm 78:3-6 Which we have heard and known, and our fathers have told us…

Psalm 105:1,2 O give thanks to the LORD; call on his name: make known his deeds …

Exodus 12:24-27 And you shall observe this thing for an ordinance to you and to your …

Exodus 13:14,15 And it shall be when your son asks you in time to come, saying, What …

Isaiah 38:19 The living, the living, he shall praise you, as I do this day: the …

Joel 1:3 Tell you your children of it, and let your children tell their children, …

in the times

Numbers 21:14-16,27-30 Why it is said in the book of the wars of the LORD, What he did in …

Job 8:8,9 For inquire, I pray you, of the former age, and prepare yourself …

Job 15:17-19 I will show you, hear me; and that which I have seen I will declare…

(1) We have heard.--The glorious traditions of ancient deliverances wrought by Jehovah for His people were a sacred heritage of every Hebrew. (See Exodus 10:2; Exodus 12:26, seq.; Deuteronomy 6:20, etc.) This, and all the historical psalms, show how closely interwoven for the Jew were patriotism and religion.

Verse 1. - We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old. The Law required all Israelites to teach their children the past history of the nation, and especially the mercies which had been vouchsafed to it (see Exodus 10:2; Exodus 12:26, 27; Exodus 13:8, 10, etc.). We have heard with our ears, O God,.... The church being in distress calls to mind the past favours of God to his people, in order to encourage her faith and hope; and this expression, delivered in such a form, shows the clearness, evidence, and certainty of what was heard; and which was heard not only as a tradition from father to son; but being recorded in the writings of Moses and the prophets, and these things read both in private and in public, were heard with the ear;

our fathers have told us what works thou didst in their days, in the times of old: such as the signs and wonders in Egypt, the slaying of the firstborn there, and the bringing of the people of Israel from thence with a mighty hand and outstretched arm; which fathers were used to tell in the ears of their sons, and sons' sons; and of which there were memorials continued in future ages, which led children to ask their parents the meaning of them; when they informed them of the wondrous works of Providence done in former times, and by which means they were handed down from age to age: see Exodus 10:2. 1 We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old.

2 How thou didst drive out the heathen with thy hand, and plantedst them, how thou didst afflict the people, and cast them out.

3 For they got not the land in possession by their own sword, neither did their own arm save them: but thy right hand, and thine arm, and the light of thy countenance, because thou hadst a favour unto them.

Psalm 44:1

"We have heard with our ears, O God." Thy mighty acts have been the subjects of common conversation; not alone in books have we read thy famous deeds, but in the ordinary talk of the people we have heard of them. Among the godly Israelites the biography of their nation was preserved by oral tradition, with great diligence and accuracy. This mode of preserving and transmitting history has its disadvantages, but it certainly produces a more vivid impression on the mind than any other; to hear with the ears affects us more sensitively than to read with the eyes; we ought to note this, and seize every possible opportunity of telling abroad the gospel of our Lord Jesus viva voce, since this is the most telling mode of communication. The expression, "heard with our ears," may denote the pleasure with which they listened, the intensity of their interest, the personality of their hearing, and the lively remembrance they had of the romantic and soul-stirring narrative. Too many have ears but hear not; happy are they who, having ears, have learned to hear.

"Our fathers have told us." They could not have had better informants. Schoolmasters are well enough, but godly fathers are, both by the order of nature and grace, the best instructors of their sons, nor can they delegate the sacred duty. It is to be feared that many children of professors could plead very little before God of what their fathers have told them. When fathers are tongue-tied religiously with their offspring, need they wonder if their children's hearts remain sin-tied? Just as in all free nations men delight to gather around the hearth, and tell the deeds of valour of their sires "in the brave days of old," so the people of God under the old dispensation made their families cheerful around the table, by rehearsing the wondrous doings of the Lord their God. Religious conversation need not be dull, and indeed it could not be if, as in this case, it dealt more with facts and less with opinions. "What work thou didst in their days, in the times of old." They began with what their own eyes had witnessed, and then passed on to what were the traditions of their youth. Note that the main point of the history transmitted from father to son was the work of God; this is the core of history, and therefore no man can write history aright who is a stranger to the Lord's work. It is delightful to see the footprints of the Lord on the sea of changing events, to behold him riding on the whirlwind of war, pestilence, and famine, and above all to see his unchanging care for his chosen people. Those who are taught to see God in history have learned a good lesson from their fathers, and no son of believing parents should be left in ignorance of so holy an art. A nation tutored as Israel was in a history so marvellous as their own, always had an available argument in pleading with God for aid in trouble, since he who never changes gives in every deed of grace a pledge of mercy yet to come. The traditions of our past experience are powerful pleas for present help.

Psalm 44:2

"How thou didst drive out the heathen with thy hand." The destruction of the Canaanites from the promised land is the work here brought to remembrance. A people numerous, warlike, gigantic and courageous, firmly established and strongly fortified, were driven out by a far feebler nation because the Lord was against them in the fight. It is clear from Scripture that God sent a plague (so that the land ate up the inhabitants thereof) and also a visitation of hornets against the Canaanites, and by other means dispirited them, so that the easy victories of Joshua were but the results of God's having worked beforehand against the idolatrous nation. "And plantedst them." The tribes of Israel were planted in the places formerly occupied by the heathen. Hivites and Jebusites were chased from their cities to make room for Ephraim and Judah. The Great Wonderworker tore up by the roots the oaks of Bashan, that he might plant instead thereof his own chosen "vineyard of red wine." "How thou didst afflict the people." With judgments and plagues the condemned nations were harassed, by fire and sword they were hunted to the death, till they were all expelled, and the enemies of Israel were banished far away. "And cast them out." This most probably refers to Israel and should be read, "caused them to increase." He who troubled his enemies smiled on his friends; he meted out vengeance to the ungodly nations, but he reserved of his mercy for the chosen tribes. How fair is mercy when she stands by the side of justice! Bright beams the star of grace amid the night of wrath! It is a solemn thought that the greatness of divine love has its counterpart in the greatness of his indignation. The weight of mercy bestowed on Israel is balanced by the tremendous vengeance which swept the thousands of Amorites and Hittites down to hell with the edge of the sword. Hell is as deep as heaven is high, and the flame of Tophet is as everlasting as the blaze of the celestial glory. God's might, as shown in deeds both of mercy and justice, should be called to mind in troublous times as a stay to our fainting faith.

Psalm 44:3

"For they got not the land in possession by their own sword." Behold how the Lord alone was exalted in bringing his people to the land which floweth with milk and honey! He, in his distinguishing grace, had put a difference between Canaan and Israel, and therefore, by his own effectual power, he wrought for his chosen and against their adversaries. The tribes fought for their allotments, but their success was wholly due to the Lord who wrought with them. The warriors of Israel were not inactive, but their valour was secondary to that mysterious, divine working by which Jericho's walls fell down, and the hearts of the heathen failed them for fear. The efforts of all the men-at-arms were employed, but as these would have been futile without divine succour, all the honour is ascribed unto the Lord. The passage may be viewed as a beautiful parable of the work of salvation; men are not saved without prayer, repentance, etc., but none of these save a man, salvation is altogether of the Lord. Canaan was not conquered without the armies of Israel, but equally true is it that it was not conquered by them; the Lord was the conqueror, and the people were but instruments in his hands. "Neither did their own arm save them." They could not ascribe their memorable victories to themselves; he who made sun and moon stand still for them was worthy of all their praise. A negative is put both upon their weapons and themselves as if to show us how ready men are to ascribe success to second causes. "But thy right hand, and thine arm, and the light of thy countenance." The divine hand actively fought for them, the divine arm powerfully sustained them with more than human energy, and the divine smile inspired them with dauntless courage. Who could not win with such triple help, though earth, death, and hell should rise in war against him? What mattered the tallness of the sons of Anak, or the terror of their chariots of iron, they were as nothing when Jehovah arose for the avenging of Israel.

"Because thou hadst a favour unto them." Here is the fountain from whence every stream of mercy flows. The Lord's delight in his people, his peculiar affection, his distinguishing regard - this is the mainspring which moves every wheel of a gracious providence. Israel was a chosen nation, hence their victories and the scattering of their foes; believers are an elect people, hence their spiritual blessings and conquests. There was nothing in the people themselves to secure them success, the Lord's favour alone did it, and it is ever so in our case, our hope of final glory must not rest on anything in ourselves, but on the free and sovereign favour of the Lord of Hosts. PSALM 44

Ps 44:1-26. In a time of great national distress, probably in David's reign, the Psalmist recounts God's gracious dealings in former times, and the confidence they had learned to repose in Him. After a vivid picture of their calamities, he humbly expostulates against God's apparent forgetfulness, reminding Him of their faithfulness and mourning their heavy sorrows.

1-3. This period is that of the settlement of Canaan (Jos 24:12; Jud 6:3).

have told—or, "related" (compare Ex 10:2).44:1-8 Former experiences of God's power and goodness are strong supports to faith, and powerful pleas in prayer under present calamities. The many victories Israel obtained, were not by their own strength or merit, but by God's favour and free grace. The less praise this allows us, the more comfort it affords, that we may see all as coming from the favour of God. He fought for Israel, else they had fought in vain. This is applicable to the planting of the Christian church in the world, which was not by any human policy or power. Christ, by his Spirit, went forth conquering and to conquer; and he that planted a church for himself in the world, will support it by the same power and goodness. They trusted and triumphed in and through him. Let him that glories, glory in the Lord. But if they have the comfort of his name, let them give unto him the glory due unto it.
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