John 6:8
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Another of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, spoke up,

New Living Translation
Then Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, spoke up.

English Standard Version
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him,

New American Standard Bible
One of His disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to Him,

King James Bible
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, saith unto him,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
One of His disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to Him, "

International Standard Version
One of his disciples, Andrew, who was Simon Peter's brother, told him,

NET Bible
One of Jesus' disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to him,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
One of his disciples, Andraus, Shimeon Kaypha's brother, said to him:

GOD'S WORD® Translation
One of Jesus' disciples, Andrew, who was Simon Peter's brother, told him,

Jubilee Bible 2000
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said unto him,

King James 2000 Bible
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said unto him,

American King James Version
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to him,

American Standard Version
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, saith unto him,

Douay-Rheims Bible
One of his disciples, Andrew, the brother of Simon Peter, saith to him:

Darby Bible Translation
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, says to him,

English Revised Version
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, saith unto him,

Webster's Bible Translation
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, saith to him,

Weymouth New Testament
One of His disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to Him,

World English Bible
One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to him,

Young's Literal Translation
one of his disciples -- Andrew, the brother of Simon Peter -- saith to him,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

6:1-14 John relates the miracle of feeding the multitude, for its reference to the following discourse. Observe the effect this miracle had upon the people. Even the common Jews expected the Messiah to come into the world, and to be a great Prophet. The Pharisees despised them as not knowing the law; but they knew most of Him who is the end of the law. Yet men may acknowledge Christ as that Prophet, and still turn a deaf ear to him.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 8, 9. - Then saith one of his disciples to him, viz. Andrew, Simon Peter's brother. The spokesman is here specially indicated. On other occasions Andrew is singled out as the brother of Simon and friend of Philip (John 1:44; John 12:22). This repeated reference to the illustrious brother of Simon is a refutation of the ill-natured charge against the author of the Gospel, that he aimed at the depreciation of the character of the great apostle. Moreover, it is interesting to remember that in the Muratorian fragment on the Canon, "Andrew" is specially mentioned as being one of those present with John in Ephesus, who urged him to write his Gospel (see Introduction, IV. 2 (3)). There is a lad here (possibly a lad who was brought with themselves, or who had attached himself to the twelve) who has five barley loaves, the bread of the poorest classes. Of this there is ample proof ('Sotah,' 2:1, quoted by Edersheim, vol. 1:681): "While all other meat offerings were of wheat, that brought by the woman accused of adultery was to be of barley, because, as her deed is that of the animals, so her offering is of the food of animals." If this lad was conveying the food stock of the Lord and his apostles, it is an impressive but accidental hint that "for our sakes he became poor," and classed himself socially with the humblest. And two fishes. The use of this word is peculiar to our Gospel (Luke, ἰχθύες; Mark, ἰχθύας, the ordinary word for "fish; "but John uses the word ὀψάρια, the diminutive of the Greek word ὄψον, which means "savoury," eaten with bread). This opsarion mostly consisted of small fishes caught in the lake, which were dried, salted as "sardines" or "anchovies" are with ourselves for a similar purpose. This habit belonged locally to the neighbourhood of the lake, and reveals the Galilman origin or associations of the writer. The Aramaic word, ophsonim, is derived from the Greek opson, and that of aphjain, or aphiz, is the name for a small fish caught in the lake, the drying of which was a lucrative source of industry. Edersheim reminds us that the fish laid on the charcoal fire (John 21:9, 10, 13) was "opsarion," and that of this the risen Lord, on the shore of this very lake, gave to his disciples to eat, though he guided them at that time to a shoal of great fishes, ἰχθύων μεγάλων, and bade them add some of these to the ὀψάρια, which he was content to use still. The use of this word on these two occasions shows that, at the last, our Lord reminds his disciples of the miraculous feeding by the shore of the lake; and both narratives breathe the air of the northern parts of Galilee. But what are these among so many? The same lesson of the insufficiency of human resources to meet great human needs is suggested by Numbers 11:21-23. Our resources at the very best are quite exhausted. Our best, our all, avails little - an expression which would apply to the numberless offers of our poor humanity and of our limited faculties to meet the moral starvation of the world. Take the Old Testament: how can the dispensation of all its provision satisfy per se the need of mankind as a whole? Greek philosophy, even if it satisfy the few, the leisurely, the cynical, the learned, the wise men of the West, what will it do for the poor, the broken hearted, the consciously guilty? The good things of this life are equally powerless, and the proposals of even truth itself, apart from the gracious operations of the Spirit, would fail to meet the wants or necessities of the unbelieving.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother,.... Who also, and his brother Peter, were of Bethsaida, as well as Philip, and was a disciple of Christ's; he hearing what Christ said to Philip, and what answer he returned,

saith unto him; to Christ, with but little more faith than Philip, if any.



John 6:8 Additional Commentaries
Context
The Feeding of the Five Thousand
7Philip answered Him, "Two hundred denarii worth of bread is not sufficient for them, for everyone to receive a little." 8One of His disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to Him, 9"There is a lad here who has five barley loaves and two fish, but what are these for so many people?"…
Cross References
John 1:40
Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, was one of the two who heard what John had said and who had followed Jesus.

John 2:2
and Jesus and his disciples had also been invited to the wedding.
Treasury of Scripture

One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, said to him,

Andrew.

John 1:40-44 One of the two which heard John speak, and followed him, was Andrew, …

Matthew 4:18 And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon …

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