Job 6:14
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
"Anyone who withholds kindness from a friend forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

New Living Translation
"One should be kind to a fainting friend, but you accuse me without any fear of the Almighty.

English Standard Version
“He who withholds kindness from a friend forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

New American Standard Bible
"For the despairing man there should be kindness from his friend; So that he does not forsake the fear of the Almighty.

King James Bible
To him that is afflicted pity should be shewed from his friend; but he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
A despairing man should receive loyalty from his friends, even if he abandons the fear of the Almighty.

International Standard Version
The friend shows gracious love for his friend, even if he has forsaken the fear of the Almighty.

NET Bible
"To the one in despair, kindness should come from his friend even if he forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

New Heart English Bible
"To him who is ready to faint, kindness should be shown from his friend; even to him who forsakes the fear of Shaddai.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"A friend should treat a troubled person kindly, even if he abandons the fear of the Almighty.

JPS Tanakh 1917
To him that is ready to faint kindness is due from his friend, Even to him that forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.

New American Standard 1977
“For the despairing man there should be kindness from his friend;
            Lest he forsake the fear of the Almighty.

Jubilee Bible 2000
He that is afflicted deserves mercy from his friend; but he has forsaken the fear of the Almighty.

King James 2000 Bible
To him that is afflicted pity should be shown from his friend; even though he forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

American King James Version
To him that is afflicted pity should be showed from his friend; but he forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

American Standard Version
To him that is ready to faint kindness'should be showed from his friend; Even to him that forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.

Douay-Rheims Bible
He that taketh away mercy from his friend, forsaketh the fear of the Lord.

Darby Bible Translation
For him that is fainting kindness [is meet] from his friend; or he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.

English Revised Version
To him that is ready to faint kindness should be shewed from his friend; even to him that forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.

Webster's Bible Translation
To him that is afflicted pity should be shown from his friend; but he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.

World English Bible
"To him who is ready to faint, kindness should be shown from his friend; even to him who forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

Young's Literal Translation
To a despiser of his friends is shame, And the fear of the Mighty he forsaketh.
Study Bible
Job Replies: My Complaint is Just
13"Is it that my help is not within me, And that deliverance is driven from me? 14"For the despairing man there should be kindness from his friend; So that he does not forsake the fear of the Almighty. 15"My brothers have acted deceitfully like a wadi, Like the torrents of wadis which vanish,…
Cross References
Job 1:5
When the days of feasting had completed their cycle, Job would send and consecrate them, rising up early in the morning and offering burnt offerings according to the number of them all; for Job said, "Perhaps my sons have sinned and cursed God in their hearts." Thus Job did continually.

Job 4:5
"But now it has come to you, and you are impatient; It touches you, and you are dismayed.

Job 15:4
"Indeed, you do away with reverence And hinder meditation before God.

Zechariah 7:9
"Thus has the LORD of hosts said, 'Dispense true justice and practice kindness and compassion each to his brother;
Treasury of Scripture

To him that is afflicted pity should be showed from his friend; but he forsakes the fear of the Almighty.

To him.

Job 4:3,4 Behold, you have instructed many, and you have strengthened the weak hands…

Job 16:5 But I would strengthen you with my mouth, and the moving of my lips …

Job 19:21 Have pity on me, have pity on me, O you my friends; for the hand …

Proverbs 17:17 A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

Romans 12:15 Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.

1 Corinthians 12:26 And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or …

2 Corinthians 11:29 Who is weak, and I am not weak? who is offended, and I burn not?

Galatians 6:2 Bear you one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.

Hebrews 13:3 Remember them that are in bonds, as bound with them; and them which …

is afflicted. Heb. melteth. he forsaketh.

Genesis 20:11 And Abraham said, Because I thought, Surely the fear of God is not …

Psalm 36:1-3 The transgression of the wicked said within my heart, that there …

Luke 23:40 But the other answering rebuked him, saying, Do not you fear God, …

(14) But he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty.--It is difficult to determine the precise relation of dependent clauses in an archaic language like the Hebrew; but the Authorised Version is, at all events, not correct here, the sense rather being, "Even to one that forsaketh the fear of the Almighty;" or, perhaps, better still, "lest he should forsake;" or, "he may even forsake," &c.

Verse 14. - To him that is afflicted pity should be showed from his friend. Job begins here the third head of his reply to Eliphaz, in which he attacks him and his companions. The first duty of a comforter is to compassionate his afflicted friend, to condole with him, and show his sympathy with his sufferings. This is what every one looks for and expects as a matter of course. But Job has looked in vain. He has received no pity, no sympathy. Nothing has been offered him but arguments. And what arguments! How do they touch the point? How are they anything more than a venting of the speaker's own self-righteousness? Let them fairly consider his case, and point out to him where he has been blamable. But he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty; rather, even though he forsake the fear of the Almighty, or else might he forsake the fear of the Almighty. Job certainly does not mean to admit that he has renounced the fear of God, and become an apostate from religion; but only to assert, either, that, even had he done so, his friends ought still to have shown him kindness, or else that their not showing him kindness is the very way to drive him to apostasy. To him that is afflicted pity should be showed from his friend,.... An "afflicted" man is an object of pity, one that is afflicted of God; either inwardly with a wounded spirit, with a sense of God's displeasure, with divine desertions, with the arrows of the Almighty sticking in him, the poison thereof drinking up his spirits; or outwardly with diseases of body, with want of the necessaries of life, with loss of near relations, as well as substance, which was Job's case; or afflicted by Satan, shot at, sifted and buffered by him, distressed by his temptations, suggestions, and solicitations; or afflicted by men, reproached and persecuted for righteousness sake: in all such cases and circumstances "pity" should be showed; which is an inward affection of the mind, a sympathy of spirit, a sensible feeling of the afflictions of others, and which is expressed by gestures, motions, and actions, as by visiting them in their affliction, speaking comfortably to them, and relieving their necessities according to ability, and as the case requires: and this may be expected from a "friend", and what the law of friendship requires, whether it be in a natural and civil sense, or in a religious and spiritual one; the union between friends being so near and close, that they are, as it were, one soul, as David and Jonathan were; and as the people of God, members of the same body are, so that if one suffers, all the rest do, or should suffer and sympathize with it: and though this duty is not always performed, at least as it should be, by natural and spiritual friends, yet this grace is always shown by God, our best of friends, who pities his children and by Christ, who is a friend that loves at all times, a brother born for adversity, and that sticks closer than any brother, and cannot but be touched with the feeling of the infirmities of his friends. The words may be rendered, "to him that is melted" (c); afflictions are like a furnace or refining pot for the melting of metals, and are called the furnace of afflictions: and saints are the metal, which are put into it; and afflictions also are the fire, of fiery trials, which heat and melt, and by which means the dross of sin and corruption is removed, and the graces of the spirit are tried and made the brighter; though here it rather signifies the melting of the heart like wax or water through the affliction, and denotes the anguish and distress, the trembling and fears, a person is in through it, being overwhelmed and borne down by it, which was Job's case: or "he that melts pity", or "whose pity melts", or "melts in pity to his friend, he forsakes" (d), &c. that is, he that fails in pity, is destitute of compassion, and shuts up the bowels of it to his friend in distress, has not the fear of God before his eyes; and this sense makes Job himself to be the friend in affliction, and Eliphaz, and those with him, the persons that are deficient in their mercy, pity, and compassion. Some render the words (e), "should reproach be cast on him that is afflicted, as that he forsakes the fear of the Almighty?" the word for pity is so used in Proverbs 14:34; and the reproach on Job was, that he had cast off the fear of God, Job 4:6. This grieved him most of all, and added to his affliction, and of which he complains as very cruel usage; and very cutting it was that he should be reckoned a man destitute of the fear of God, and that because he was afflicted by him; though rather the following words:

but he forsaketh the fear of the Almighty, are a charge upon his friend Eliphaz for not showing pity to him in his affliction, which was tacitly forsaking the fear of God. Job here recriminates and retorts the charge of want of the fear of God on Eliphaz himself; for to show mercy to an afflicted friend is a religious act, a part of pure and undefiled religion, a branch of the fear of God; and he that neglects it is so far wanting in it, and acts contrary to his profession of God, of fear of him, and love to him; see James 1:26; or "otherwise he forsakes", &c. (f).

(c) "liquefacto", Vatablus, Mercerus, Beza; so Ben Gersom. (d) "Cujus liquescit benignitas", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, "qui misericordia erga amicum contabescit", Schultens. (e) Mercerus, Vatablus, so Ben Gersom. Some interpret it as a charge that he forsakes both mercy and the fear of the Lord; so R. Simeon Bar Tzemach, Sephorno, and Ben Melech. (f) So Pagninus & Beza. 14. pity—a proverb. Charity is the love which judges indulgently of our fellow men: it is put on a par with truth in Pr 3:3, for they together form the essence of moral perfection [Umbreit]. It is the spirit of Christianity (1Pe 4:8; 1Co 13:7; Pr 10:12; 17:17). If it ought to be used towards all men, much more towards friends. But he who does not use it forsaketh (renounceth) the fear of the Almighty (Jas 2:13).6:14-30 In his prosperity Job formed great expectations from his friends, but now was disappointed. This he compares to the failing of brooks in summer. Those who rest their expectations on the creature, will find it fail when it should help them; whereas those who make God their confidence, have help in the time of need, Heb 4:16. Those who make gold their hope, sooner or later will be ashamed of it, and of their confidence in it. It is our wisdom to cease from man. Let us put all our confidence in the Rock of ages, not in broken reeds; in the Fountain of life, not in broken cisterns. The application is very close; for now ye are nothing. It were well for us, if we had always such convictions of the vanity of the creature, as we have had, or shall have, on a sick-bed, a death-bed, or in trouble of conscience. Job upbraids his friends with their hard usage. Though in want, he desired no more from them than a good look and a good word. It often happens that, even when we expect little from man, we have less; but from God, even when we expect much, we have more. Though Job differed from them, yet he was ready to yield as soon as it was made to appear that he was in error. Though Job had been in fault, yet they ought not to have given him such hard usage. His righteousness he holds fast, and will not let it go. He felt that there had not been such iniquity in him as they supposed. But it is best to commit our characters to Him who keeps our souls; in the great day every upright believer shall have praise of God.
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Alphabetical: A Almighty be despairing devotion does even fear For forsake forsakes friend friends from have he his kindness man not of should So that the there though

OT Poetry: Job 6:14 To him who is ready to faint (Jb) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Job 6:13
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