Job 12:5
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New International Version
Those who are at ease have contempt for misfortune as the fate of those whose feet are slipping.

New Living Translation
People who are at ease mock those in trouble. They give a push to people who are stumbling.

English Standard Version
In the thought of one who is at ease there is contempt for misfortune; it is ready for those whose feet slip.

New American Standard Bible
"He who is at ease holds calamity in contempt, As prepared for those whose feet slip.

King James Bible
He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The one who is at ease holds calamity in contempt and thinks it is prepared for those whose feet are slipping.

International Standard Version
The carefree are thinking, 'I have contempt for misfortune,' Those who are about to stumble deserve it.

NET Bible
For calamity, there is derision (according to the ideas of the fortunate)--a fate for those whose feet slip!

New Heart English Bible
In the thought of him who is at ease there is contempt for misfortune. It is ready for them whose foot slips.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"A person who has an easy life has no appreciation for misfortune. He thinks it is the fate of those who slip up.

JPS Tanakh 1917
A contemptible brand in the thought of him that is at ease, A thing ready for them whose foot slippeth.

New American Standard 1977
“He who is at ease holds calamity in contempt,
            As prepared for those whose feet slip.

Jubilee Bible 2000
The torch is held in low esteem in the thought of him that is prosperous, which was prepared to guard against a slip of the feet.

King James 2000 Bible
He that is ready to slip with his feet is like a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.

American King James Version
He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.

American Standard Version
In the thought of him that is at ease there is contempt for misfortune; It is ready for them whose foot slippeth.

Douay-Rheims Bible
The lamp despised in the thoughts of the rich, is ready for the time appointed.

Darby Bible Translation
He that is ready to stumble with the foot is a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.

English Revised Version
In the thought of him that is at ease there is contempt for misfortune; it is ready for them whose foot slippeth.

Webster's Bible Translation
He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.

World English Bible
In the thought of him who is at ease there is contempt for misfortune. It is ready for them whose foot slips.

Young's Literal Translation
A torch -- despised in the thoughts of the secure Is prepared for those sliding with the feet.
Study Bible
Job's Response to Zophar
4"I am a joke to my friends, The one who called on God and He answered him; The just and blameless man is a joke. 5"He who is at ease holds calamity in contempt, As prepared for those whose feet slip. 6"The tents of the destroyers prosper, And those who provoke God are secure, Whom God brings into their power.…
Cross References
Job 12:4
"I am a joke to my friends, The one who called on God and He answered him; The just and blameless man is a joke.

Job 12:6
"The tents of the destroyers prosper, And those who provoke God are secure, Whom God brings into their power.

Psalm 123:4
Our soul is greatly filled With the scoffing of those who are at ease, And with the contempt of the proud.
Treasury of Scripture

He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.

ready

Deuteronomy 32:35 To me belongs vengeance and recompense; their foot shall slide in …

Psalm 17:5 Hold up my goings in your paths, that my footsteps slip not.

Psalm 94:18 When I said, My foot slips; your mercy, O LORD, held me up.

Jeremiah 13:16 Give glory to the LORD your God, before he cause darkness, and before …

a lamp

Job 18:5 Yes, the light of the wicked shall be put out, and the spark of his …

Proverbs 13:9 The light of the righteous rejoices: but the lamp of the wicked shall …

Proverbs 20:20 Whoever curses his father or his mother, his lamp shall be put out …

Matthew 25:8 And the foolish said to the wise, Give us of your oil; for our lamps …

of him

Job 6:5 Does the wild donkey bray when he has grass? or lows the ox over his fodder?

Job 16:4 I also could speak as you do: if your soul were in my soul's stead, …

Psalm 123:3,4 Have mercy on us, O LORD, have mercy on us: for we are exceedingly …

Amos 6:1-6 Woe to them that are at ease in Zion, and trust in the mountain of …

Luke 12:19 And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have much goods laid up for …

Luke 16:19,20 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine …

(5) Is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease.--This rendering conveys no sense. The meaning is either that the lamp or torch prepared for feet tottering and uncertain in the darkness is disregarded and rejected by those who are at ease, and need no such aid; in which case one does not see very clearly why Job compares himself to such a torch: or, more probably, there is contempt for calamity in the thoughts of him that is at ease, it is ready at hand for them who are tottering with their feet.

Verse 5. - He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease; rather, as in the Revised Version, In the thought of him that is at ease there is contempt for misfortune; it (i e. contempt) is ready for them whose foot slippeth. The meaning is, "I am despised and scorned by you who sit at ease, because my foot has slipped, and I have fallen into misfortune." He that is ready to slip with his feet,.... Not into sin, though this is often the case of good men, but into calamities and afflictions; and Job means himself, and every just upright man in the like circumstances: or he that is "prepared" or "destined" to be among them, that "totter" and stagger in their "feet" (i); that cannot stand upon their feet, but fall to the ground; which may describe man in declining and distressing circumstances; or that is appointed to be the laughing stock of such as are unstable in the word and ways of God; double minded men, hypocrites, and formal professors, that totter and stagger at everything they meet with disagreeable to the flesh: with such, a poor afflicted saint is laughed to scorn; he

is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease; who are in affluent circumstances, enjoy great prosperity, live in plenty, and are not in trouble as others; their hearts are at ease: now with such, poor good men are had in great contempt; they are despised at heart, in the thoughts of such persons, if they do not in words express it; they are like a lamp just going out, which is neglected, and looked upon as useless; or like a torch burnt to the end, when it is thrown away; and thus it is with men, while the lamp of prosperity burns clear and bright, they are valued and had in esteem, but when their lamp becomes dim, and is almost, or quite extinguished, they are despised, see Psalm 123:3; some apply this to Christ, who was a lamp or light, a great one, but despised of men, and even as a light; they loved darkness rather than light; and especially by the Pharisees, who were at ease, settled on their lees, that trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others; and this is true of Gospel ministers, though bright and burning lights, and even of every good man, in whom the true light of grace, and of the Gospel, shines, and especially when under afflictive circumstances. Some, instead of a "lamp despised", read, "for" or "because of calamity despised" (k); so Aben Ezra, which conveys the same sense, that an afflicted man is despised for his affliction; and this being the case of good men confutes the notion of Job's friends, that it always goes well with such; and their other notion of its going ill with bad men is refuted in Job 12:6.

(i) "destinatus vacillantibus pede", Schmidt; so Michaelis. (k) "ad calamitatem contumelia", Cocceius; "ad infortunium vilis habetur", Gussetius, p. 674. 5. Rather, "a torch" (lamp) is an object of contempt in the thoughts of him who rests securely (is at ease), though it was prepared for the falterings of the feet [Umbreit] (Pr 25:19). "Thoughts" and "feet" are in contrast; also rests "securely," and "falterings." The wanderer, arrived at his night-quarters, contemptuously throws aside the torch which had guided his uncertain steps through the darkness. As the torch is to the wanderer, so Job to his friends. Once they gladly used his aid in their need; now they in prosperity mock him in his need.12:1-5 Job upbraids his friends with the good opinion they had of their own wisdom compared with his. We are apt to call reproofs reproaches, and to think ourselves mocked when advised and admonished; this is our folly; yet here was colour for this charge. He suspected the true cause of their conduct to be, that they despised him who was fallen into poverty. It is the way of the world. Even the just, upright man, if he comes under a cloud, is looked upon with contempt.
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