Job 1:20
Parallel Verses
New International Version
At this, Job got up and tore his robe and shaved his head. Then he fell to the ground in worship

New Living Translation
Job stood up and tore his robe in grief. Then he shaved his head and fell to the ground to worship.

English Standard Version
Then Job arose and tore his robe and shaved his head and fell on the ground and worshiped.

New American Standard Bible
Then Job arose and tore his robe and shaved his head, and he fell to the ground and worshiped.

King James Bible
Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then Job stood up, tore his robe, and shaved his head. He fell to the ground and worshiped,

International Standard Version
Then Job stood up, tore his robe, shaved his head, fell to the ground, bowed very low,

NET Bible
Then Job got up and tore his robe. He shaved his head, and then he threw himself down with his face to the ground.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Job stood up, tore his robe in grief, and shaved his head. Then he fell to the ground and worshiped.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then Job arose and rent his mantle and shaved his head and fell down upon the ground and worshipped

King James 2000 Bible
Then Job arose, and tore his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshiped,

American King James Version
Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down on the ground, and worshipped,

American Standard Version
Then Job arose, and rent his robe, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped;

Douay-Rheims Bible
Then Job rose up, and rent his garments, and having shaven his head fell down upon the ground and worshipped,

Darby Bible Translation
And Job rose up, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down on the ground, and worshipped;

English Revised Version
Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped;

Webster's Bible Translation
Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell upon the ground, and worshiped,

World English Bible
Then Job arose, and tore his robe, and shaved his head, and fell down on the ground, and worshiped.

Young's Literal Translation
And Job riseth, and rendeth his robe, and shaveth his head, and falleth to the earth, and doth obeisance,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

1:20-22 Job humbled himself under the hand of God. He reasons from the common state of human life, which he describes. We brought nothing of this world's goods into the world, but have them from others; and it is certain we can carry nothing out, but must leave them to others. Job, under all his losses, is but reduced to his first state. He is but where he must have been at last, and is only unclothed, or unloaded rather, a little sooner than he expected. If we put off our clothes before we go to bed, it is some inconvenience, but it may be the better borne when it is near bed-time. The same who gave hath taken away. See how Job looks above instruments, and keeps his eye upon the First Cause. Afflictions must not divert us from, but quicken us to religion. If in all our troubles we look to the Lord, he will support us. The Lord is righteous. All we have is from his gift; we have forfeited it by sin, and ought not to complain if he takes any part from us. Discontent and impatience charge God with folly. Against these Job carefully watched; and so must we, acknowledging that as God has done right, but we have done wickedly, so God has done wisely, but we have done very foolishly. And may the malice and power of Satan render that Saviour more precious to our souls, who came to destroy the works of the devil; who, for our salvation, suffered from that enemy far more than Job suffered, or we can think.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 20. - Then Job arose. Not till the last calamity was announced did Job stir. The loss of his wealth little moved him. But when he heard that his children were destroyed, all of them "at one fell swoop," then he could endure no longer, but rose from the seat on which he was sitting, and showed forth his grief. First he rent his mantle, "the outer robe worn by men of rank" (Cook) - a customary sign of grief in the ancient world (Genesis 37:29, 34; Genesis 44:13; 1 Kings 21:27; 2 Kings 19:1; Esther 4:1; Joel 2:13; Herod., 8:99; Livy, 1:13, etc.); then he shaved his head - another less usual but still not uncommon sign of grief, forbidden under the Law of the Jews (Leviticus 21:5; Deuteronomy 14:1), but widely practised by the Gentiles (Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 48:37; Herod., 2:36; 9:24; Plut.,'Vit. Pelop.,' § 34; Q. Gurt.,'Vit. Alex.,' 10:5, § 17). And fell down upon the ground, and worshipped. After giving vent to his natural grief, Job made an act of adoration. Recognizing the fact that adversity, as well as prosperity comes from God, and submitting himself to the Divine will, he "worshipped." How often has his act flashed across the minds of Christians. and enabled them, in their dark hour, to imitate him, and repeat his words, "The Lord gave," etc.!

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Then Job arose,.... Either from table, being at dinner, as some think, in his own house; it being the time that his children were feasting in their eldest brother's house; or from the business in which he was employed, which he stopped on hearing this news; or from his seat, or chair of state in which he sat; or rather the phrase only signifies, that he at once, with strength of body, and rigour of mind, which were not lost, as often they are in such cases, went about the following things with great composure and sedateness. It is indeed generally observed, that there is an emphasis to be put on the word "then", which may be as well rendered "and", as if Job sat and heard very sedately, without any perturbation of mind, the loss of his substance; but when tidings were brought him of the death of his children, "then" he arose, as being greatly moved and distressed; but it should be observed till now there was no stop or intermission in the messengers, but before one had done speaking, another came and began to tell his story, and so there was no opportunity, as well as not the occasion, of arising and doing what follows; and which he did, not through the violence of his passion, or excess of grief, but as common and ordinary things, which were used to be done in that country for the loss of relations, and in token of mourning for them:

and rent his mantle; or "cloak" (k), as Mr. Broughton; but whether this was an outward garment, as each of these seem to be, if the same with ours, or an interior one, as some think, it is not very material to know; both were rent by Ezra upon a mournful occasion, Ezra 9:3, and it was usual to rend garments for deceased relations, or when they were thought to be so, see Genesis 37:29, though some think that this was on the account of the blasphemous thoughts the devil now suggested into his mind, being solicitous to gain his point, and work upon him to curse God; upon which he rent his garment to show his resentment and indignation at the thought of it, as the Jews used to rend their garments at hearing of blasphemy; but the first sense is best:

and shaved his beard; either he himself, or his servant by his orders; and which was done among the eastern nations as a sign of mourning, see Isaiah 15:2 and among the Greeks, as appears from Homer (l); nor was this contrary to the law in Deuteronomy 14:1, where another baldness, not of the head, but between the eyes, is forbidden for the dead; besides this was before that law was in being, and, had it been, Job was not bound by it, being not of the Israelitish nation: some, as Jarchi, Aben Ezra, and other Jewish writers, interpret this of his plucking or tearing off the hair of his head; but this neither agrees with the sense of the word here used, which has the signification of shearing or mowing, rather than of tearing or plucking, nor with the firmness and composure of Job's mind, who betrayed not any effeminacy or weakness; and though he showed a natural affection for the loss of his substance, and children, as a man, and did not affect a stoical apathy, and brutal insensibility, yet did not give any extraordinary vent to his passion: he behaved both like a man, and a religious man; he mourned for his dead, but not to excess; he sorrowed not as those without hope, and used the common tokens of it, and rites attending it; which shows that mourning for deceased relations, if done in moderation, is not unlawful, nor complying with the rites and customs of a country, in such cases, provided they are not sinful in themselves, nor contrary to the revealed and declared will of God:

and fell down upon the ground; in veneration of God, of his holiness and justice, and as sensible of his awful hand upon him, and as being humbled under it, and patiently submitting to it; he did not stand up, and curse God to his face, as Satan said he would, but fell upon his face to the ground; he did not curse his King and his God, and look upwards, see Isaiah 8:21 but prostrated himself to the earth in great humility before him; besides, this may be considered as a prayer gesture, since it follows:

and worshipped; that is, God, for who else should he worship? he worshipped him internally in the exercise of faith, hope, love, humility, patience, &c. and he worshipped him externally by praising him, and praying to him, expressing himself as in the next verse: afflictions, when sanctified, humble good men, cause them to lie low in the dust, and bring them near to God, to the throne of his grace, and instead of arraigning his providence, and finding fault with his dealings, they adore his majesty, and celebrate his perfections.

(k) "pallium suum", Pagninus, Montanus, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Schultens; "tunicam suam", Munster, Cocceius, Schmidt, Jo. Henric. Michaelis. (l) , &c. Odyss. 4. ver. 198. & Odyss. 24. ver. 46.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

20. Job arose—not necessarily from sitting. Inward excitement is implied, and the beginning to do anything. He had heard the other messages calmly, but on hearing of the death of his children, then he arose; or, as Eichorn translates, he started up (2Sa 13:31). The rending of the mantle was the conventional mark of deep grief (Ge 37:34). Orientals wear a tunic or shirt, and loose pantaloons; and over these a flowing mantle (especially great persons and women). Shaving the head was also usual in grief (Jer 41:5; Mic 1:16).

Job 1:20 Additional Commentaries
Context
Job Loses his Children and Property
19and behold, a great wind came from across the wilderness and struck the four corners of the house, and it fell on the young people and they died, and I alone have escaped to tell you." 20Then Job arose and tore his robe and shaved his head, and he fell to the ground and worshiped. 21He said, "Naked I came from my mother's womb, And naked I shall return there. The LORD gave and the LORD has taken away. Blessed be the name of the LORD."…
Cross References
Genesis 37:29
When Reuben returned to the cistern and saw that Joseph was not there, he tore his clothes.

Genesis 37:34
Then Jacob tore his clothes, put on sackcloth and mourned for his son many days.

Joshua 7:6
Then Joshua tore his clothes and fell facedown to the ground before the ark of the LORD, remaining there till evening. The elders of Israel did the same, and sprinkled dust on their heads.

2 Kings 2:12
Elisha saw this and cried out, "My father! My father! The chariots and horsemen of Israel!" And Elisha saw him no more. Then he took hold of his garment and tore it in two.

Job 1:19
when suddenly a mighty wind swept in from the desert and struck the four corners of the house. It collapsed on them and they are dead, and I am the only one who has escaped to tell you!"

Job 2:12
When they saw him from a distance, they could hardly recognize him; they began to weep aloud, and they tore their robes and sprinkled dust on their heads.

Jeremiah 7:29
"'Cut off your hair and throw it away; take up a lament on the barren heights, for the LORD has rejected and abandoned this generation that is under his wrath.

Joel 2:13
Rend your heart and not your garments. Return to the LORD your God, for he is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love, and he relents from sending calamity.
Treasury of Scripture

Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down on the ground, and worshipped,

rent.

Genesis 37:29,34 And Reuben returned to the pit; and, behold, Joseph was not in the …

Ezra 9:3 And when I heard this thing, I rent my garment and my mantle, and …

mantle. or robe. fell.

Deuteronomy 9:18 And I fell down before the LORD, as at the first, forty days and …

2 Samuel 12:16-20 David therefore sought God for the child; and David fasted, and went …

2 Chronicles 7:3 And when all the children of Israel saw how the fire came down, and …

Matthew 26:39 And he went a little farther, and fell on his face, and prayed, saying, …

1 Peter 5:6 Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he …

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