2 Timothy 4:13
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments.

New Living Translation
When you come, be sure to bring the coat I left with Carpus at Troas. Also bring my books, and especially my papers.

English Standard Version
When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, also the books, and above all the parchments.

Berean Study Bible
When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments.

Berean Literal Bible
Upon coming, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus in Troas, and the books, especially the parchments.

New American Standard Bible
When you come bring the cloak which I left at Troas with Carpus, and the books, especially the parchments.

King James Bible
The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, but especially the parchments.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When you come, bring the cloak I left in Troas with Carpus, as well as the scrolls, especially the parchments.

International Standard Version
When you come, bring the coat I left with Carpus in Troas, as well as the scrolls and especially the parchments.

NET Bible
When you come, bring with you the cloak I left in Troas with Carpas and the scrolls, especially the parchments.

New Heart English Bible
Bring the cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus when you come, and the books, especially the parchments.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
When you come, bring the bookcase and the books that I left in Troas with Qarpus, especially the parchment scrolls.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When you come, bring the warm coat I left with Carpus in the city of Troas. Also bring the scrolls and especially the parchments.

New American Standard 1977
When you come bring the cloak which I left at Troas with Carpus, and the books, especially the parchments.

Jubilee Bible 2000
The cloak that I left at Troas in the house of Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee and the books, but especially the parchments.

King James 2000 Bible
The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus, when you come, bring with you, and the books, but especially the parchments.

American King James Version
The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus, when you come, bring with you, and the books, but especially the parchments.

American Standard Version
The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus, bring when thou comest, and the books, especially the parchments.

Douay-Rheims Bible
The cloak that I left at Troas, with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, especially the parchments.

Darby Bible Translation
The cloak which I left behind [me] in Troas at Carpus's, bring when thou comest, and the books, especially the parchments.

English Revised Version
The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, bring when thou comest, and the books, especially the parchments.

Webster's Bible Translation
The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, but especially the parchments.

Weymouth New Testament
When you come, bring with you the cloak which I left behind at Troas at the house of Carpus, and the books, but especially the parchments.

World English Bible
Bring the cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus when you come, and the books, especially the parchments.

Young's Literal Translation
the cloak that I left in Troas with Carpus, coming, bring thou and the books -- especially the parchments.
Study Bible
Personal Concerns
12Tychicus, however, I have sent to Ephesus. 13When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments. 14Alexander the coppersmith did great harm to me. The Lord will repay him according to his deeds.…
Cross References
Matthew 5:40
if someone wants to sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well;

Acts 16:8
So they passed by Mysia and went down to Troas.

Acts 16:11
We sailed from Troas straight to Samothrace, and on the following day on to Neapolis.

Acts 20:38
They were especially grieved by his statement that they would never see his face again. Then they accompanied him to the ship.
Treasury of Scripture

The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus, when you come, bring with you, and the books, but especially the parchments.

cloak.

1 Corinthians 4:11 Even to this present hour we both hunger, and thirst, and are naked, …

2 Corinthians 11:27 In weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, …

Troas.

Acts 16:8,11 And they passing by Mysia came down to Troas…

Acts 20:5-12 These going before tarried for us at Troas…

(13) The cloke that I left at Troas.--The apparently trivial nature of this request in an Epistle containing such weighty matter, and also the fact of such a wish on the part of one expecting death being made at all, is at first a little puzzling. To explain this seemingly strange request, some have wished to understand by "the cloke" some garment St. Paul was in the habit of wearing when performing certain sacred functions: in other words, as a vestment; but such a supposition would be in the highest degree precarious, for nowhere in the New Testament is the slightest hint given us that any such vestment was ever used in the primitive Christian Church. It is much better to understand the words as simply requesting Timothy, on his way, to bring with him a thick cloak, or mantle, which St. Paul had left with a certain Carpus at Troas. Probably, when he left it, it was summer, and he was disinclined to burden himself in his hurried journey with any superfluous things. Winter was now coming on, and the poor aged prisoner in the cold damp prison, with few friends and scant resources, remembered and wished for his cloak. It is just such a request which the master would make of his disciple, who, knowing well the old man's frail, shattered health, would never be surprised at such a request even in an Epistle so solemn. Then too St. Paul, by his very wish here expressed, to see Timothy, as above discussed, hopes against hope that still a little while for work in the coming winter months was still before him, though he felt death was for him very near; no forger of the Epistle had dreamed of putting down such a request.

And the books.--The books were, most likely, a few choice works, some bearing on Jewish sacred history, partly exegetical and explanatory of the mysterious senses veiled under the letter of the law and the prophets, and partly historical. Others were probably heathen writings, of which we know, from his many references in his Epistles, St. Paul was a diligent student. These few choice books, it has been suggested, with high probability, St. Paul "had made a shift to get and preserve," and these, if God spared his life yet a few short months, he would have with him for reference in his prison room.

But especially the parchments.--These precious papers, above all, would St. Paul have with him. These were, most likely, common-place books, in which the Apostle--evidently always a diligent student--had written what he had observed as worthy of especial notice in the reading of either of the Scriptures of the Old Testament, or the other books bearing on Jewish or Pagan literature and history. These precious notes were probably the result of many years' reading and study. He would have them with him as long as life remained to him. (Compare on this strange but interesting verse Bp. Bull's learned and exhaustive sermon: Works, vol. i. p. 240, Oxford Edition, 1846.) Erasmus remarks on this request of St. Paul: "Behold the Apostle's goods or movables: a poor cloke to keep him from the weather, and a few books!"

A suggestion has been made that the words translated "Much learning doth make thee mad" (Acts 26:24) should be rendered, Thy many rolls of parchment are turning thy brain, and that these rolls of parchment referred to by Festus as the companions of St. Paul's captivity at Csarea were identical with those parchments left with Carpus. The Greek words, however, are not the same in the two passages. Of this Carpus nothing is known.

Verse 13. - Bring when thou comest for when thou comest bring with thee, A.V.; especially for but especially, A.V. The cloke (τὸν φελόνην, more properly written φαινόλην); the Latin paenula, the thick overcoat or cloke. Only here in the New Testament. Some think it was the bag in which the books and parchments were packed. The parchments (τὰς μεμβράνας). This, again, is a Latin word. It occurs only here in the New Testament. They would probably be for the apostle to write his Epistles on. Or they may have been valuable manuscripts of some kind. In ver. 20 we learn that St. Paul had lately been at Miletus; and in 1 Timothy 1:3 that he was then going to Macedonia. Tress would be on his way to Macedonia, Greece, and Rome (Acts 16:8, 9, 11), as it was on the return journey from Macedonia to Miletus (Acts 20:5, 15). It should further be observed that the journey here indicated is the same as that referred to in 1 Timothy 1:3, which confirms the inevitable inference from this chapter that St. Paul, on his way to Rome from Miletus, whither he had come from Crete (Titus 1:5), passed through Tress, Macedonia, and Corinth (ver. 20), leaving Timothy at Ephesus. (See Introduction.) The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus,.... About the word here rendered a "cloak", interpreters are not agreed: some take it for a garment, and about this they differ; some would have it to be a dignified robe, such as the Roman consuls and senators of Rome wore; which is not likely, this being not suitable to the apostle's character, state, and circumstances. Others take it to be a courser and meaner garment, wore in cold and rainy weather, to preserve from the inclementencies of it; and winter now coming on, 2 Timothy 4:21 the apostle sends for it; which he perhaps had left at Troas in the summer season, as he came: but others take it to be a kind of desk or scrutoire, to put papers in, or a chest for books, a book press; and so the Syriac version renders it; and which agrees with what follows. Jerom understands it of a book itself, of the Hebrew volume of the Pentateuch (g). Troas, where this cloak, or book press, or book was, was a city in Asia Minor, that stood upon, or near the same place where old Troy stood, and from whence it seems to have had its name, and lay in Timothy's way from Ephesus to Rome; See Gill on Acts 16:8, Acts 20:7 and as for Carpus, he was Paul's host when he was at Troas. Some make him to be first bishop of Laodicea, and then of Crete; he is reckoned among the seventy disciples, and is said to be bishop of Berytus in Thrace; See Gill on Luke 10:1.

When thou comest, bring with thee; he would have him call for it at Troas as he came by, and bring it with him:

and the books; that were in it, or were there, besides the Hebrew Pentateuch: the apostle was a great reader of books, of various sorts, both Gentile and Jewish, as appears by his citations out of the Heathen poets, and his acquaintance with Jewish records, Acts 17:28. And though he was now grown old, and near his exit, yet was mindful and careful of his books, and desirous of having them to read; and herein set an example to Timothy and others, and enforced the exhortation he gave him, 1 Timothy 4:13.

But especially the parchments: which might contain his own writings he had a mind to revise before his death, and commit into the hands of proper persons; or some observations which he had made in his travels, concerning persons and things; though it is most likely that these were the books of the Old Testament, which were written on parchments, and rolled up together; and hence they are called the volume of the book; and these the apostle had a special regard for, that whatever was neglected, he desired that these might not, but be carefully brought unto him.

(g) Epist. ad Damas. qu. 2. p. 12. Tom. 3.13. cloak … I left—probably obliged to leave it in a hurried departure from Troas.

Carpus—a faithful friend to have been entrusted with so precious deposits. The mention of his "cloak," so far from being unworthy of inspiration, is one of those graphic touches which sheds a flood of light on the last scene of Paul's life, on the confines of two worlds; in this wanting a cloak to cover him from the winter cold, in that covered with the righteousness of saints, "clothed upon with his house from heaven" [Gaussen]. So the inner vesture and outer garment of Jesus, Paul's master, are suggestive of most instructive thought (Joh 19:2).

books—He was anxious respecting these that he might transmit them to the faithful, so that they might have the teaching of his writings when he should be gone.

especially the parchments—containing perhaps some of his inspired Epistles themselves.4:9-13 The love of this world, is often the cause of turning back from the truths and ways of Jesus Christ. Paul was guided by Divine inspiration, yet he would have his books. As long as we live, we must still learn. The apostles did not neglect human means, in seeking the necessaries of life, or their own instruction. Let us thank the Divine goodness in having given us so many writings of wise and pious men in all ages; and let us seek that by reading them our profiting may appear to all.
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