Matthew 26:14
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Then one of the Twelve--the one called Judas Iscariot--went to the chief priests

New Living Translation
Then Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve disciples, went to the leading priests

English Standard Version
Then one of the twelve, whose name was Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests

New American Standard Bible
Then one of the twelve, named Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests

King James Bible
Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then one of the Twelve--the man called Judas Iscariot--went to the chief priests

International Standard Version
Then one of the Twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the high priests

NET Bible
Then one of the twelve, the one named Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Then one of the twelve who is called Yehuda Scariota went out to the Chief Priests,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Then one of the twelve apostles, the one named Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the princes of the priests

King James 2000 Bible
Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,

American King James Version
Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests,

American Standard Version
Then one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,

Douay-Rheims Bible
Then went one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, to the chief priests,

Darby Bible Translation
Then one of the twelve, he who was called Judas Iscariote, went to the chief priests

English Revised Version
Then one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,

Webster's Bible Translation
Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests,

Weymouth New Testament
At that time one of the Twelve, the one called Judas Iscariot, went to the High Priests

World English Bible
Then one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests,

Young's Literal Translation
Then one of the twelve, who is called Judas Iscariot, having gone unto the chief priests, said,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

26:14-16 There were but twelve called apostles, and one of them was like a devil; surely we must never expect any society to be quite pure on this side heaven. The greater profession men make of religion, the greater opportunity they have of doing mischief, if their hearts be not right with God. Observe, that Christ's own disciple, who knew so well his doctrine and manner of his life, and was false to him, could not charge him with any thing criminal, though it would have served to justify his treachery. What did Judas want? Was not he welcome wherever his Master was? Did he not fare as Christ fared? It is not the lack, but the love of money, that is the root of all evil. After he had made that wicked bargain, Judas had time to repent, and to revoke it; but when lesser acts of dishonesty have hardened the conscience men do without hesitation that which is more shameful.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 14-16. - Compact of Judas with the Jewish authorities to betray Jesus. (Mark 14:10, 11; Luke 22:3-6.) Verse 14. - Then. The time referred to is the close of Christ's addresses, and the assembling of the Jewish authorities mentioned at the beginning of the chapter, vers. 6-13 being parenthetical. It is reasonable to suppose that the loss of the three hundred denarii, at which he would have had the handling, and the reproof then administered, gave the final impulse to the treachery of Judas. This seems to be signified by the synoptists' introduction of the transaction at Bethany immediately before the account of Judas's infamous bargain (see preliminary note on vers. 6-13). One of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot. That he was one of the twelve, the chosen companions of Christ, emphasizes his crime, makes it more amazing and more heinous. To witness the daily life of Christ, to behold his miracles of mercy, to listen to his heavenly teaching, to hear his stern denunciations of such sins as covetousness and hypocrisy, and in spite of all to bargain with his bitterest enemies for his betrayal, reveals a depth of perverse wickedness which is simply appalling. Well may the evangelist say that Satan entered into Judas (Luke 22:3); it was the devil's work he was doing; he followed this evil inspiration, and thought not whither it would lead him. Went unto the chief priests. Their hostility was no secret. Judas and everybody knew of their hatred of Jesus, and of their attempts to get him into their power; he saw his way to carrying out his purpose, and making of it some pecuniary gain. We are not to suppose that this miserable man sank all at once to this depth of iniquity. Nemo repente fit turpissimus. Though the descent to Avernus be easy, it is gradual; it has its steps and pauses, its allurements and checks. Modern criticism has endeavoured to minimize the crime of Judas, or even to regard him as a hero misunderstood; but the facts are entirely in favour of the traditional view. We can trace the path by which the apostle developed into the traitor, by studying the hints which the Gospels afford. He was probably at first fairly sincere in attaching himself to Christ's company. Being a man of business capacity and skill in the management of money matters, he was appointed treasurer of the little funds at the disposal of Christ and his followers. Half-hearted and self-seeking, his undertaking this office was a snare to which he easily fell a victim. He began by petty peculations, which were not discovered by his comrades (John 12:6), though he must often have felt an uneasy apprehension that his Master saw through him, and that many of his warnings were directed at him (see John 6:64, 70, 71). This feeling lessened the love for Jesus, though it did not drive him to open apostasy. He had admitted the demon of covetousness to his breast, and he now adhered to Christ for the hope of satisfying greed and worldly ambition. The teaching and miracles of Christ had no marked influence on such a disposition, softened not his hard heart, effected no change in his evil and selfish desires. And when he saw his hopes disappointed, when he heard Christ's announcement of his speedy death, which his knowledge of the rulers' animosity rendered only too certain, his only feeling was hatred and disgust. The transient expectations raised by the triumphal entry were not fulfilled; there was no assumption of the earthly conqueror's part, there were no rewards for Christ's followers, nothing but enmity and threatening danger on every side. Judas, seeing all this, perceiving that no worldly advantage would be gained by fidelity to the losing side, determined to make what profit he could under present circumstances. Not with the mistaken idea of forcing Christ to declare himself, and to put himself at the head of a popular movement, nor with any notion of Christ miraculously saving himself from his enemies' hands, but simply from sordid love of gain, he made his infamous offer to the chief priests. It was just when they were in perplexity, and had determined on nothing except that the arrest and the condemnation were not to take place during the feast, that Judas was introduced into the assembly. No wonder "they were glad" (Mark 14:11); here was a solution of the contemplated difficulty; they need have no fear of a rising in favour of Christ; if among his chosen followers some were disaffected, and one was ready to betray him, they might work their will, when he was once quietly apprehended, without any danger of rescue and disturbance (see on Matthew 27:3).

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot,.... Who was provoked and exasperated, to the last degree, by this action of the woman, and Christ's defence of it, and because the ointment was not sold, and the money put into his hand; and being instigated by Satan, who had now entered into him, formed a scheme in his mind to betray his master, and was resolved to put it in execution, whereby he might, in some measure, satisfy both his avarice and revenge; and, as an aggravation of this his wickedness, he is described, as "one of the twelve": of his twelve disciples; so the Persic and Ethiopic versions: this is a way of speaking used by the Jews (k); they call the twelve lesser prophets, or "the twelve", without any other word added thereunto. He was not an open enemy, nor one of Christ's common hearers, nor one of the seventy disciples, but one of his twelve apostles, whom he made his intimates and associates; whom he selected from all others, and called, qualified, and sent forth to preach his Gospel, and perform miracles: it was one of these that meditated the delivery of him into the hands of his enemies, and never left pursuing his scheme till he had effected it, even Judas Iscariot by name; so called, to distinguish him from another disciple, whose name was also Judas. This man

went to the chief priests; of his own accord, unasked, from Bethany, to Jerusalem, to Caiaphas's palace, where the chief priests, the implacable enemies of Christ, with the Scribes, and elders of the people, were met together, to consult his death: Mark adds, "to betray him unto them", Mark 14:10, which was manifestly his intent in going to them; and Luke, that he "communed" with them "how he might betray him unto them", Luke 22:4; in the safest, and most private manner; and both observe that they were glad; for nothing could have fallen out more to their wishes, who were met together on this design. The Jews, in their blasphemous account of Jesus (l), say as much: they own, that Judas, or Juda, as they call him, offered to betray him into the hands of the wise men, saying to them, almost in the words expressed in the following verse,

"if you will hearken unto me, , "I will deliver him into your hands tomorrow";''

and which agrees very well with the time also: for it was two days before the passover that Jesus was in Bethany, where he supped with his disciples, and washed their feet, and had the box of ointment poured on his head; and on the night of the day after all this was done, Judas set out from thence to Jerusalem; see John 13:30, so that it must be the next day before he could meet the high priests, and on the morrow, at night, he delivered him into their hands; on the proposal of which, they say, that Simeon ben Shetach, whom they make to be present at this time, and all the wise men and elders, "rejoiced exceedingly".

(k) T. Bab. Bava Bathra, fol. 14. 2. & 15. 1.((l) Toldos Jesu, p. 16.



Matthew 26:14 Additional Commentaries
Context
Judas Agrees to Betray Jesus
14Then one of the twelve, named Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests 15and said, "What are you willing to give me to betray Him to you?" And they weighed out thirty pieces of silver to him.…
Cross References
Matthew 10:4
Simon the Zealot and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him.

Matthew 26:25
Then Judas, the one who would betray him, said, "Surely you don't mean me, Rabbi?" Jesus answered, "You have said so."

Matthew 26:47
While he was still speaking, Judas, one of the Twelve, arrived. With him was a large crowd armed with swords and clubs, sent from the chief priests and the elders of the people.

Matthew 27:3
When Judas, who had betrayed him, saw that Jesus was condemned, he was seized with remorse and returned the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and the elders.

Mark 14:10
Then Judas Iscariot, one of the Twelve, went to the chief priests to betray Jesus to them.

Mark 14:11
They were delighted to hear this and promised to give him money. So he watched for an opportunity to hand him over.

Luke 22:3
Then Satan entered Judas, called Iscariot, one of the Twelve.

John 6:71
(He meant Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot, who, though one of the Twelve, was later to betray him.)

John 12:4
But one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, who was later to betray him, objected,

John 13:26
Jesus answered, "It is the one to whom I will give this piece of bread when I have dipped it in the dish." Then, dipping the piece of bread, he gave it to Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot.

Acts 1:16
and said, "Brothers and sisters, the Scripture had to be fulfilled in which the Holy Spirit spoke long ago through David concerning Judas, who served as guide for those who arrested Jesus.

Acts 1:18
(With the payment he received for his wickedness, Judas bought a field; there he fell headlong, his body burst open and all his intestines spilled out.
Treasury of Scripture

Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests,

one.

Mark 14:10 And Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve, went to the chief priests, …

Luke 22:3-6 Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot, being of the number …

John 13:2,30 And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of …

Judas.

Matthew 10:4 Simon the Canaanite, and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him.

John 6:70,71 Jesus answered them, Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil…

John 18:2 And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus often …

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