Matthew 6:10
New International Version
your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

New Living Translation
May your Kingdom come soon. May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.

English Standard Version
Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Berean Study Bible
Your kingdom come, Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Berean Literal Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done as in heaven, so also upon earth.

New American Standard Bible
'Your kingdom come. Your will be done, On earth as it is in heaven.

King James Bible
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Christian Standard Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done

Contemporary English Version
Come and set up your kingdom, so that everyone on earth will obey you, as you are obeyed in heaven.

Good News Translation
may your Kingdom come; may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

International Standard Version
May your kingdom come. May your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

NET Bible
may your kingdom come, may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

New Heart English Bible
Let your Kingdom come. Let your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Let your Kingdom come, let your will be done also in the earth, just as it is in Heaven.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Let your kingdom come. Let your will be done on earth as it is done in heaven.

New American Standard 1977
‘Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

King James 2000 Bible
Your kingdom come. Your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

American King James Version
Your kingdom come, Your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

American Standard Version
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so on earth.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Darby Bible Translation
let thy kingdom come, let thy will be done as in heaven so upon the earth;

English Revised Version
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so on earth.

Webster's Bible Translation
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Weymouth New Testament
let Thy kingdom come; let Thy will be done, as in Heaven so on earth;

World English Bible
Let your Kingdom come. Let your will be done, as in heaven, so on earth.

Young's Literal Translation
'Thy reign come: Thy will come to pass, as in heaven also on the earth.
Study Bible
The Lord's Prayer
9So then, this is how you should pray: ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be Your name, 10Your kingdom come, Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. 11Give us this day our daily bread.…
Cross References
Psalm 103:20
Bless the LORD, all His angels mighty in strength, who do His word, who hearken to the voice of his command.

Matthew 3:2
and saying, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near."

Matthew 4:17
From that time on Jesus began to preach, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near."

Matthew 26:42
A second time He went away and prayed, "My Father, if this cup cannot pass unless I drink it, may Your will be done."

Luke 22:42
"Father, if You are willing, take this cup from Me. Yet not My will, but Yours be done."

Acts 21:14
When he would not be dissuaded, we fell silent and said, "The Lord's will be done."

Treasury of Scripture

Your kingdom come, Your will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Thy kingdom.

Matthew 3:2
And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

Matthew 4:17
From that time Jesus began to preach, and to say, Repent: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

Matthew 16:28
Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.

Thy will.

Matthew 7:21
Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.

Matthew 12:50
For whosoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, the same is my brother, and sister, and mother.

Matthew 26:42
He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done.

as.

Nehemiah 9:6
Thou, even thou, art LORD alone; thou hast made heaven, the heaven of heavens, with all their host, the earth, and all things that are therein, the seas, and all that is therein, and thou preservest them all; and the host of heaven worshippeth thee.

Psalm 103:19-21
The LORD hath prepared his throne in the heavens; and his kingdom ruleth over all…

Daniel 4:35
And all the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing: and he doeth according to his will in the army of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth: and none can stay his hand, or say unto him, What doest thou?







Lexicon
Your
σου (sou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

kingdom
βασιλεία (basileia)
Noun - Nominative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 932: From basileus; properly, royalty, i.e. rule, or a realm.

come,
Ἐλθέτω (Elthetō)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2064: To come, go.

Your
σου (sou)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 2nd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

will
θέλημά (thelēma)
Noun - Nominative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 2307: An act of will, will; plur: wishes, desires. From the prolonged form of ethelo; a determination, i.e. choice or inclination.

be done,
Γενηθήτω (Genēthētō)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Passive - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1096: A prolongation and middle voice form of a primary verb; to cause to be, i.e. to become, used with great latitude.

on
ἐπὶ (epi)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1909: On, to, against, on the basis of, at.

earth
γῆς (gēs)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 1093: Contracted from a primary word; soil; by extension a region, or the solid part or the whole of the terrene globe.

as [it is]
Ὡς (Hōs)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 5613: Probably adverb of comparative from hos; which how, i.e. In that manner.

in
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

heaven.
οὐρανῷ (ouranō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3772: Perhaps from the same as oros; the sky; by extension, heaven; by implication, happiness, power, eternity; specially, the Gospel.
(10) Thy kingdom come.--Historically, the prayer had its origin in the Messianic expectations embodied in the picture of the ideal king in Isaiah 11:1-6; Isaiah 42:1-7, Daniel 7:14. It had long been familiar to all who looked for the consolation of Israel. Now the kingdom of God, that in which He manifests His sovereignty more than in the material world or in the common course of history, had been proclaimed as nigh at hand. The Teacher of the prayer knew Himself to be the Head of that kingdom. But it was not, like the kingdoms of the world, one that rested on the despotism of might, but on the acknowledgment of righteousness. It was therefore ever growing to a completeness, which it has never yet reached. Its advance to that completeness might be retarded by man's self-will, and hastened by man's fulfilment of its conditions. And therefore we pray that it may "come" in its fulness, that all created beings may bring their wills into harmony with God's will. So tar as that prayer comes from the heart and not from the lips only, it is in part self-fulfilling, in part it works according to the law by which God answers prayers that are in harmony with His own will; and in so far as the kingdom, though in one sense it has come, and is in the midst of us, and within us, is yet far from the goal towards which it moves, ever coming and yet to come, the prayer is one that never becomes obsolete, and may be the utterance of the saints in glory no less than of toilers and sufferers upon earth.

Thy will be done.--The prayer has often been, even in the lips of Christians, hardly more than the "acceptance of the inevitable." Like the Stoic, we have submitted to a destiny; like the Moslem, we have been resigned to a decree. But as it came from the lips of the Son of Man, it was surely far more than this. We pray that the will of God may be done because we believe it to be perfectly loving and righteous. It is the will that desires our sanctification (1Thessalonians 4:3), that does not will that any should perish. The real difficulty in the prayer is, that it lands us, as before. in a mystery which we cannot solve. It assumes that even the will of God is in part dependent on our wills, that it will not be done unless we so pray. The question, "Who hath resisted this will? Does it not ever fulfil itself?" forces itself on our thoughts. And the answer is found, as before, in accepting the seeming paradox of prayer. In one sense the will of God, which is also the eternal law, must fulfil itself; but it is one thing for that law to work in subduing all things to itself, another for it to bring all created wills into harmony with itself. And in really praying for this we, as before, in part fulfil the prayer.

As it is in heaven.--The thought is true of the order of the visible heaven, where law reigns supreme, with no "variableness or shadow of turning." But seeing that the obedience contemplated is that of the will, it is better, perhaps, to think of the words as pointing to the unseen hosts of heaven, the ministering angels, and the spirits of just men made perfect. That all wills on earth should be brought into the same entire conformity with the divine will as theirs, is what we are taught to pray for.

Verse 10. - Thy kingdom come. Let there come the full establishment of thy realm. The prayer passes from the personal acceptance in the heart of God's revelation of himself to the consequent result. The clause has a much wider meaning than the development and spread of the Church, or even the personal return of Christ at the second advent. It speaks of that which shall be the issue of both this and that, the final and perfect establishment of God's realm, in which all men will do him willing service, and all habits and customs, individual and social, will be such as he approves of (vide Introduction, p. 25.). Dr. C. Taylor ('Sayings,' etc., Exc. 5.) points out that the coming of the kingdom and the sanctifying of the Name are brought together in Zechariah 14:9; Weiss, ' Life,' 2:349, with many others, says that our Lord probably adapted the frequent Jewish prayer for the coming of the kingdom of Messiah. Thy will be done. Let thy will come into complete existence (γενηθήτω; cf. "Let there be light," Genesis 1:3, LXX.). The thought is not merely God's will realized in this or that action, whether performed or endured by us (cf. Matthew 26:42; Acts 21:14), but God's will as a whole coming into full being. God's will is always in ideal until it is accomplished in act. The connexion of the clause with what has gone before is therefore this - the acceptance of God's manifestation of himself leads to the establishment of his realm, and this to the realization of his will, which until then is only ideal (cf. Matthew 5:18, note, end). If this be all the meaning of the words, they express, in fact, only the ultimate result of the consummation prayed for in the preceding clause (hence this portion of the prayer was in itself complete without our present words; cf. Luke 11:2); but since it is so far a distinct thought that it would not immediately suggest itself, it has a worthy place in the fuller form of the prayer. Possibly, however, more may be intended. The full establishment of the kingdom may be only a part of his loving will, which may, for all we know, have countless other things in view. The highest prayer that we can make in the furtherance of God's cause is that his gracious purpose, his will (whatever it may include) may be fully brought about. In earth, as it is in heaven; as in heaven, so on earth (Revised Version). Probably the words are to be joined to only the immediately preceding clause. In heaven God's will is already realized; not yet on earth, where sin has entered. 6:9-15 Christ saw it needful to show his disciples what must commonly be the matter and method of their prayer. Not that we are tied up to the use of this only, or of this always; yet, without doubt, it is very good to use it. It has much in a little; and it is used acceptably no further than it is used with understanding, and without being needlessly repeated. The petitions are six; the first three relate more expressly to God and his honour, the last three to our own concerns, both temporal and spiritual. This prayer teaches us to seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and that all other things shall be added. After the things of God's glory, kingdom, and will, we pray for the needful supports and comforts of this present life. Every word here has a lesson in it. We ask for bread; that teaches us sobriety and temperance: and we ask only for bread; not for what we do not need. We ask for our bread; that teaches us honesty and industry: we do not ask for the bread of others, nor the bread of deceit, Pr 20:17; nor the bread of idleness, Pr 31:27, but the bread honestly gotten. We ask for our daily bread; which teaches us constantly to depend upon Divine Providence. We beg of God to give it us; not sell it us, nor lend it us, but give it. The greatest of men must be beholden to the mercy of God for their daily bread. We pray, Give it to us. This teaches us a compassion for the poor. Also that we ought to pray with our families. We pray that God would give it us this day; which teaches us to renew the desires of our souls toward God, as the wants of our bodies are renewed. As the day comes we must pray to our heavenly Father, and reckon we could as well go a day without food, as without prayer. We are taught to hate and dread sin while we hope for mercy, to distrust ourselves, to rely on the providence and grace of God to keep us from it, to be prepared to resist the tempter, and not to become tempters of others. Here is a promise, If you forgive, your heavenly Father will also forgive. We must forgive, as we hope to be forgiven. Those who desire to find mercy with God, must show mercy to their brethren. Christ came into the world as the great Peace-maker, not only to reconcile us to God, but one to another.
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