2 Timothy 4:13
New International Version
When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments.

New Living Translation
When you come, be sure to bring the coat I left with Carpus at Troas. Also bring my books, and especially my papers.

English Standard Version
When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, also the books, and above all the parchments.

Berean Study Bible
When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments.

Berean Literal Bible
Upon coming, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus in Troas, and the books, especially the parchments.

King James Bible
The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, but especially the parchments.

New King James Version
Bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas when you come—and the books, especially the parchments.

New American Standard Bible
When you come, bring the overcoat which I left at Troas with Carpus, and the books, especially the parchments.

NASB 1995
When you come bring the cloak which I left at Troas with Carpus, and the books, especially the parchments.

NASB 1977
When you come bring the cloak which I left at Troas with Carpus, and the books, especially the parchments.

Amplified Bible
When you come bring the coat that I left at Troas with Carpus, and the books, especially the parchments.

Christian Standard Bible
When you come, bring the cloak I left in Troas with Carpus, as well as the scrolls, especially the parchments.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When you come, bring the cloak I left in Troas with Carpus, as well as the scrolls, especially the parchments.

American Standard Version
The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus, bring when thou comest, and the books, especially the parchments.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
When you come, bring the bookcase and the books that I left in Troas with Qarpus, especially the parchment scrolls.

Contemporary English Version
When you come, bring the coat I left at Troas with Carpus. Don't forget to bring the scrolls, especially the ones made of leather.

Douay-Rheims Bible
The cloak that I left at Troas, with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, especially the parchments.

English Revised Version
The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, bring when thou comest, and the books, especially the parchments.

Good News Translation
When you come, bring my coat that I left in Troas with Carpus; bring the books too, and especially the ones made of parchment.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When you come, bring the warm coat I left with Carpus in the city of Troas. Also bring the scrolls and especially the parchments.

International Standard Version
When you come, bring the coat I left with Carpus in Troas, as well as the scrolls and especially the parchments.

Literal Standard Version
coming, bring the cloak that I left in Troas with Carpus and the scrolls—especially the parchments.

NET Bible
When you come, bring with you the cloak I left in Troas with Carpas and the scrolls, especially the parchments.

New Heart English Bible
Bring the cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus when you come, and the books, especially the parchments.

Weymouth New Testament
When you come, bring with you the cloak which I left behind at Troas at the house of Carpus, and the books, but especially the parchments.

World English Bible
Bring the cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus when you come, and the books, especially the parchments.

Young's Literal Translation
the cloak that I left in Troas with Carpus, coming, bring thou and the books -- especially the parchments.

Additional Translations ...
Context
Personal Concerns
12Tychicus, however, I have sent to Ephesus. 13When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments. 14Alexander the coppersmith did great harm to me. The Lord will repay him according to his deeds.…

Cross References
Matthew 5:40
if someone wants to sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well;

Acts 16:8
So they passed by Mysia and went down to Troas.

Acts 16:11
We sailed from Troas straight to Samothrace, and the following day on to Neapolis.

Acts 20:38
They were especially grieved by his statement that they would never see his face again. Then they accompanied him to the ship.


Treasury of Scripture

The cloak that I left at Troas with Carpus, when you come, bring with you, and the books, but especially the parchments.

cloak.

1 Corinthians 4:11
Even unto this present hour we both hunger, and thirst, and are naked, and are buffeted, and have no certain dwellingplace;

2 Corinthians 11:27
In weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.

Troas.

Acts 16:8,11
And they passing by Mysia came down to Troas…

Acts 20:5-12
These going before tarried for us at Troas…









(13) The cloke that I left at Troas.--The apparently trivial nature of this request in an Epistle containing such weighty matter, and also the fact of such a wish on the part of one expecting death being made at all, is at first a little puzzling. To explain this seemingly strange request, some have wished to understand by "the cloke" some garment St. Paul was in the habit of wearing when performing certain sacred functions: in other words, as a vestment; but such a supposition would be in the highest degree precarious, for nowhere in the New Testament is the slightest hint given us that any such vestment was ever used in the primitive Christian Church. It is much better to understand the words as simply requesting Timothy, on his way, to bring with him a thick cloak, or mantle, which St. Paul had left with a certain Carpus at Troas. Probably, when he left it, it was summer, and he was disinclined to burden himself in his hurried journey with any superfluous things. Winter was now coming on, and the poor aged prisoner in the cold damp prison, with few friends and scant resources, remembered and wished for his cloak. It is just such a request which the master would make of his disciple, who, knowing well the old man's frail, shattered health, would never be surprised at such a request even in an Epistle so solemn. Then too St. Paul, by his very wish here expressed, to see Timothy, as above discussed, hopes against hope that still a little while for work in the coming winter months was still before him, though he felt death was for him very near; no forger of the Epistle had dreamed of putting down such a request.

And the books.--The books were, most likely, a few choice works, some bearing on Jewish sacred history, partly exegetical and explanatory of the mysterious senses veiled under the letter of the law and the prophets, and partly historical. Others were probably heathen writings, of which we know, from his many references in his Epistles, St. Paul was a diligent student. These few choice books, it has been suggested, with high probability, St. Paul "had made a shift to get and preserve," and these, if God spared his life yet a few short months, he would have with him for reference in his prison room.

But especially the parchments.--These precious papers, above all, would St. Paul have with him. These were, most likely, common-place books, in which the Apostle--evidently always a diligent student--had written what he had observed as worthy of especial notice in the reading of either of the Scriptures of the Old Testament, or the other books bearing on Jewish or Pagan literature and history. These precious notes were probably the result of many years' reading and study. He would have them with him as long as life remained to him. (Compare on this strange but interesting verse Bp. Bull's learned and exhaustive sermon: Works, vol. i. p. 240, Oxford Edition, 1846.) Erasmus remarks on this request of St. Paul: "Behold the Apostle's goods or movables: a poor cloke to keep him from the weather, and a few books!"

A suggestion has been made that the words translated "Much learning doth make thee mad" (Acts 26:24) should be rendered, Thy many rolls of parchment are turning thy brain, and that these rolls of parchment referred to by Festus as the companions of St. Paul's captivity at Caesarea were identical with those parchments left with Carpus. The Greek words, however, are not the same in the two passages. Of this Carpus nothing is known.

Verse 13. - Bring when thou comest for when thou comest bring with thee, A.V.; especially for but especially, A.V. The cloke (τὸν φελόνην, more properly written φαινόλην); the Latin paenula, the thick overcoat or cloke. Only here in the New Testament. Some think it was the bag in which the books and parchments were packed. The parchments (τὰς μεμβράνας). This, again, is a Latin word. It occurs only here in the New Testament. They would probably be for the apostle to write his Epistles on. Or they may have been valuable manuscripts of some kind. In ver. 20 we learn that St. Paul had lately been at Miletus; and in 1 Timothy 1:3 that he was then going to Macedonia. Tress would be on his way to Macedonia, Greece, and Rome (Acts 16:8, 9, 11), as it was on the return journey from Macedonia to Miletus (Acts 20:5, 15). It should further be observed that the journey here indicated is the same as that referred to in 1 Timothy 1:3, which confirms the inevitable inference from this chapter that St. Paul, on his way to Rome from Miletus, whither he had come from Crete (Titus 1:5), passed through Tress, Macedonia, and Corinth (ver. 20), leaving Timothy at Ephesus. (See Introduction.)

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
When you come,
ἐρχόμενος (erchomenos)
Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 2064: To come, go.

bring
φέρε (phere)
Verb - Present Imperative Active - 2nd Person Singular
Strong's 5342: To carry, bear, bring; I conduct, lead; perhaps: I make publicly known. A primary verb.

the
τὸν (ton)
Article - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

cloak
φαιλόνην (phailonēn)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 5341: A mantle, cloak. By transposition for a derivative probably of phaino; a mantle.

that
ὃν (hon)
Personal / Relative Pronoun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3739: Who, which, what, that.

I left
ἀπέλιπον (apelipon)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Singular
Strong's 620: From apo and leipo; to leave behind; by implication, to forsake.

with
παρὰ (para)
Preposition
Strong's 3844: Gen: from; dat: beside, in the presence of; acc: alongside of.

Carpus
Κάρπῳ (Karpō)
Noun - Dative Masculine Singular
Strong's 2591: Carpus, a Christian of Troas. Perhaps for karpos; Carpus, probably a Christian.

at
ἐν (en)
Preposition
Strong's 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

Troas,
Τρῳάδι (Trōadi)
Noun - Dative Feminine Singular
Strong's 5174: Troas, a harbor city of Mysia. From Tros; the Troad, i.e. Troas, a place in Asia Minor.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

[my]
τὰ (ta)
Article - Accusative Neuter Plural
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

scrolls,
βιβλία (biblia)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Plural
Strong's 975: A papyrus roll. A diminutive of biblos; a roll.

especially
μάλιστα (malista)
Adverb
Strong's 3122: Most of all, especially. Neuter plural of the superlative of an apparently primary adverb mala; most or particularly.

the
τὰς (tas)
Article - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

parchments.
μεμβράνας (membranas)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Plural
Strong's 3200: A parchment leaf, perhaps for notes. Of Latin origin; a sheep-skin.


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