Genesis 27:1
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
When Isaac was old and his eyes were so weak that he could no longer see, he called for Esau his older son and said to him, "My son." "Here I am," he answered.

New Living Translation
One day when Isaac was old and turning blind, he called for Esau, his older son, and said, "My son." "Yes, Father?" Esau replied.

English Standard Version
When Isaac was old and his eyes were dim so that he could not see, he called Esau his older son and said to him, “My son”; and he answered, “Here I am.”

New American Standard Bible
Now it came about, when Isaac was old and his eyes were too dim to see, that he called his older son Esau and said to him, "My son." And he said to him, "Here I am."

King James Bible
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his eldest son, and said unto him, My son: and he said unto him, Behold, here am I.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When Isaac was old and his eyes were so weak that he could not see, he called his older son Esau and said to him, "My son." And he answered, "Here I am."

International Standard Version
Eventually, Isaac grew so old that he could not see. One day, he called his eldest son Esau. "My son," he called out to him.

NET Bible
When Isaac was old and his eyes were so weak that he was almost blind, he called his older son Esau and said to him, "My son!" "Here I am!" Esau replied.

New Heart English Bible
It happened, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his elder son, and said to him, "My son?" He said to him, "Here I am."

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When Isaac was old and going blind, he called his older son Esau and said to him, "Son!" Esau answered, "Here I am."

JPS Tanakh 1917
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his elder son, and said unto him: 'My son'; and he said unto him: 'Here am I.'

New American Standard 1977
Now it came about, when Isaac was old, and his eyes were too dim to see, that he called his older son Esau and said to him, “My son.” And he said to him, “Here I am.”

Jubilee Bible 2000
And it came to pass, that when Isaac became old, and his eyes were dim so that he could not see, he called Esau, his eldest son, and said unto him, My son, and he said unto him, Behold, here am I.

King James 2000 Bible
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his eldest son, and said unto him, My son: and he said unto him, Behold, here am I.

American King James Version
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his oldest son, and said to him, My son: and he said to him, Behold, here am I.

American Standard Version
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his elder son, and said unto him, My son. And he said unto him, Here am I.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Now Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, and he could not see: and he called Esau, his elder son, and said to him: My son? And he answered: Here I am.

Darby Bible Translation
And it came to pass when Isaac had become old, and his eyes were dim so that he could not see, that he called Esau his elder son, and said to him, My son! And he said to him, Here am I.

English Revised Version
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his elder son, and said unto him, My son: and he said unto him, Here am I.

Webster's Bible Translation
And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his eldest son, and said to him, My son: and he said to him, Behold, here am I.

World English Bible
It happened, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his elder son, and said to him, "My son?" He said to him, "Here I am."

Young's Literal Translation
And it cometh to pass that Isaac is aged, and his eyes are too dim for seeing, and he calleth Esau his elder son, and saith unto him, 'My son;' and he saith unto him, 'Here am I.'
Study Bible
Jacob's Deception
1Now it came about, when Isaac was old and his eyes were too dim to see, that he called his older son Esau and said to him, "My son." And he said to him, "Here I am." 2Isaac said, "Behold now, I am old and I do not know the day of my death.…
Cross References
Genesis 25:25
Now the first came forth red, all over like a hairy garment; and they named him Esau.

Genesis 25:33
And Jacob said, "First swear to me"; so he swore to him, and sold his birthright to Jacob.

Genesis 48:10
Now the eyes of Israel were so dim from age that he could not see. Then Joseph brought them close to him, and he kissed them and embraced them.

Deuteronomy 34:7
Although Moses was one hundred and twenty years old when he died, his eye was not dim, nor his vigor abated.

1 Samuel 3:2
It happened at that time as Eli was lying down in his place (now his eyesight had begun to grow dim and he could not see well),

Ecclesiastes 12:3
in the day that the watchmen of the house tremble, and mighty men stoop, the grinding ones stand idle because they are few, and those who look through windows grow dim;
Treasury of Scripture

And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see, he called Esau his oldest son, and said to him, My son: and he said to him, Behold, here am I.

A.M.

Genesis 48:10 Now the eyes of Israel were dim for age, so that he could not see. …

1 Samuel 3:2 And it came to pass at that time, when Eli was laid down in his place, …

Ecclesiastes 12:3 In the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong …

John 9:3 Jesus answered, Neither has this man sinned, nor his parents: but …

eldest son.

Genesis 25:23-25 And the LORD said to her, Two nations are in your womb, and two manner …

XXVII.

JACOB BY SUBTILTY OBTAINS THE FIRSTBORN'S BLESSING.

(1) It came to pass.--The importance of this chapter is manifest. Just as in Abraham's life the decision had to be made which of the two sons, Ishmael and Isaac, was to be the heir of the promise, so, here again, there is the same Divine election (Romans 9:10-13): but while Abraham obeyed, though with heavy heart (Genesis 21:11), Isaac even struggled against God's will, and his assent was obtained by human craft working tortuously to effect that which God would have wrought in His own better way. In this case, however, the sons are more closely allied, being twins, born of the same mother, but the younger following so closely upon the very heels of the elder as to seem, even at his birth, as if in eager pursuit. They grow up strangely unlike--the one brave, active, vigorous, but indifferent to everything save earthly things. In his skill and love of hunting, Esau is the very counterpart of Ishmael. The other is calm, sedentary, keenly alive to business, devoted to domestic pursuits, but chiefly valuing the spiritual privileges for which Abraham had left his distant home, and become a wanderer in the highlands of Canaan. Thoroughly as all honest men must disapprove of the mean way in which Jacob bought the birthright, yet, at least, he valued that which Esau so despised as to sell it for the gratification of a hungry appetite. And now again the transfer is ratified by means of another unworthy artifice, but Esau this time is grieved and distressed; for at least he loved his father, and gave proof of the possession of the same warm heart that made him afterwards fall so lovingly upon his brother's neck, and kiss him with tears of hearty affection (Genesis 33:4).

For Jacob, it must be said that he sought no earthly good. It was not the elder brother's share of the father's wealth that he wanted. All that was Isaac's he resigned to Esau, and went away to push his fortunes elsewhere. Even when he returned with the substance he had gotten in Padan-aram, he was no match for Esau (Genesis 33:1), though Isaac was still living. While, too, Esau violated the family law laid down by Abraham, Jacob conformed to it. By marrying Canaanitish women, Esau forfeited by his own act the birthright which previously he had sold; for his children, being illegitimate (Hebrews 12:16), could not inherit the promise. What was utterly wrong in Rebekah's and Jacob's conduct was that they used miserable artifices to do that which should have been left to God; and Isaac was equally wrong in trying to make void and annul the clear intimation of prophecy (Genesis 25:23).

Isaac was old.--Isaac was now 117 years of age. but he lived to be 180 (Genesis 35:28). (See Excursus on Chronology of Jacob's Life at end of this book.) He had thus sixty-three more years to live, but not only himself (Genesis 27:2), but Esau also expected his speedy decease (Genesis 27:41). Probably, therefore, his failing eyesight was the result of some acute disorder, which so enfeebled his general health that he had grown despondent, and thought his death near. But evidently he recovered, and attained to a good old age. It seems, however, that though the lives of the patriarchs were so long extended, yet that their bodily vigour slowly decayed through the latter portion of their days. Jacob when but 130 speaks of himself as a grey-haired old man, already upon the brink of the grave (Genesis 42:38; Genesis 47:9). Moreover, the term old is used in a very general sense in the Old Testament, and thus Samuel is described as old in 1Samuel 8:1, when we should have spoken of him as at most middle-aged.

Verse 1. - And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old, - according to the generally accepted calculation, in his one hundred and thirty-seventh year. Joseph, having been introduced to Pharaoh in his thirtieth year (Genesis 41:46), and having been thirty-nine years of age (Genesis 45:6) when his father, aged one hundred and thirty (Genesis 47:9), came down to Egypt, must have been born before Jacob was ninety-one; consequently, as his birth occurred in the fourteenth year of Jacob's sojourn in Mesopotamia (cf. Genesis 30:25 with Genesis 29:18, 21, 27), Jacob's flight must have taken place when he was seventy-seven. But Jacob was born in Isaac's sixtieth year (Genesis 25:26); hence Isaac was now one hundred and thirty-seven. There are, however, difficulties connected with this reckoning which lay it open to suspicion. For one thing, it postpones Jacob s marriage to an extremely late period. Then it takes for granted that the term of Jacob's service in Padan-aram was only twenty years (Genesis 31:41), whereas it is not certain whether it was not forty, made up, according to the computation of Kennicott, of fourteen years' service, twenty years' assistance as a neighbor, and six years of work for wages. And, lastly, it necessitates the birth of Jacob's eleven children in the short space of six years, a thing which appears to some, it not impossible, at least highly improbable. Adopting the larger number as the term of Jacob s sojourn in Mesopotamia, Isaac would at this time be only one hundred and seventeen (vide 'Chronologer of Jacob's Life,' 31:41) - and his eyes were dim, - literally, were failing in strength, hence becoming dim (1 Samuel 3:2). In describing Jacob s decaying vision a different verb is employed (Genesis 48:10) - so that he could not see, - literally, from seeing; מִן with the inf. constr, conveying the idea of receding from the state of perfect vision (cf. Genesis 16:2; Genesis 31:29; vide Gesenius, 'Hebrew Grammar,' § 132) - he called Esau his eldest son, - Esau was born before his twin brother Jacob (Genesis 25:25) - and said unto him, My son: - i.e. my special son, my beloved son, the language indicating fondness and partiality (Genesis 25:28) - and he (Esau) said unto him, Behold, here am I. And it came to pass, that when Isaac was old,.... He is generally thought to be about one hundred and thirty seven years of age at this time, which was just the age of his brother Ishmael when he died, Genesis 25:16; and might put him in mind of his own death as near at hand; though if he was no older, he lived after this forty three years, for he lived to be one hundred and eighty years old, Genesis 35:28,

and his eyes were dim, so that he could not see; which circumstance is mentioned, not only as a sign of old age, and as common to it, but for the sake of the following history, and as accounting for it, that he should not know Jacob when he blessed him; and this was so ordered in Providence, that by means of it the blessing might be transferred to him, which otherwise in all probability would not have been done, if Isaac had had his sight:

he called Esau his eldest son; who though he was married, and had been married thirty seven years at this time, yet still lived in his father's house, or near him; for as he was born when his father was sixty years of age, and he married when he himself was forty, and his father must be an hundred, so if Isaac was now one hundred and thirty seven, Esau must have been married thirty seven years; and though he had disobliged his father by his marriage, yet he retained a natural affliction for him; nor had he turned him out of doors, nor had he any thoughts of disinheriting him; but on the contrary intended to bestow the blessing on him as the firstborn, for which reason he is here called "his eldest son":

and said unto him, my son; owning the relation, expressing a tender affection for him, and signifying he had something further to say unto him:

and he said unto him, behold, here am I; by which Esau intimated he was ready to hear what his father had to say to him, and was willing to obey him. The Targum of Jonathan says, this was the fourteenth of Nisan, when Isaac called Esau to him. CHAPTER 27

Ge 27:1-27. Infirmity of Isaac.

1. when Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim—He was in his hundred thirty-seventh year; and apprehending death to be near, Isaac prepared to make his last will—an act of the gravest importance, especially as it included the conveyance through a prophetic spirit of the patriarchal blessing.27:1-5 The promises of the Messiah, and of the land of Canaan, had come down to Isaac. Isaac being now about 135 years of age, and his sons about 75, and not duly considering the Divine word concerning his two sons, that the elder should serve the younger, resolved to put all the honour and power that were in the promise, upon Esau his eldest son. We are very apt to take measures rather from our own reason than from Divine revelation, and thereby often miss our way.
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