Daniel 5:1
New International Version
King Belshazzar gave a great banquet for a thousand of his nobles and drank wine with them.

New Living Translation
Many years later King Belshazzar gave a great feast for 1,000 of his nobles, and he drank wine with them.

English Standard Version
King Belshazzar made a great feast for a thousand of his lords and drank wine in front of the thousand.

Berean Study Bible
Many years later King Belshazzar held a great feast for a thousand of his nobles, and he drank wine with them.

New American Standard Bible
Belshazzar the king held a great feast for a thousand of his nobles, and he was drinking wine in the presence of the thousand.

King James Bible
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

Christian Standard Bible
King Belshazzar held a great feast for a thousand of his nobles and drank wine in their presence.

Contemporary English Version
One evening, King Belshazzar gave a great banquet for a thousand of his highest officials, and he drank wine with them.

Good News Translation
One night King Belshazzar invited a thousand noblemen to a great banquet, and they drank wine together.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
King Belshazzar held a great feast for 1,000 of his nobles and drank wine in their presence.

International Standard Version
King Belshazzar put on a great festival for a thousand of his officials. He joined all one thousand of them in getting drunk.

NET Bible
King Belshazzar prepared a great banquet for a thousand of his nobles, and he was drinking wine in front of them all.

New Heart English Bible
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
King Belshazzar threw a large banquet for 1,000 nobles and drank wine with them.

JPS Tanakh 1917
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

New American Standard 1977
Belshazzar the king held a great feast for a thousand of his nobles, and he was drinking wine in the presence of the thousand.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Belshazzar the king made a great banquet to a thousand of his lords, and against the thousand he drank wine.

King James 2000 Bible
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

American King James Version
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

American Standard Version
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
Baltasar the king made a great supper for his thousand nobles, and there was wine before the thousand.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Baltasar the king made a great feast for a thousand of his nobles: and every one drank according to his age.

Darby Bible Translation
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his nobles, and drank wine before the thousand.

English Revised Version
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

Webster's Bible Translation
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

World English Bible
Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

Young's Literal Translation
Belshazzar the king hath made a great feast to a thousand of his great men, and before the thousand he is drinking wine;
Study Bible
Belshazzar's Impious Feast
1Many years later King Belshazzar held a great feast for a thousand of his nobles, and he drank wine with them. 2Under the influence of the wine, Belshazzar gave orders to bring in the gold and silver vessels that Nebuchadnezzar his father had taken from the temple in Jerusalem, so that the king could drink from them, along with his nobles, his wives, and his concubines.…
Cross References
Esther 1:3
In the third year of his reign, Xerxes held a feast for all his officials and servants. The military leaders of Persia and Media were there, along with the nobles and princes of the provinces.

Isaiah 21:5
They prepare a table, they lay out a carpet, they eat, they drink! Rise up, O princes, oil the shields!

Isaiah 22:12
On that day the Lord GOD of Hosts called for weeping and wailing, for shaven heads and the wearing of sackcloth.

Jeremiah 50:35
A sword is against the Chaldeans, declares the LORD, against those who live in Babylon, and against her officials and wise men.

Daniel 5:30
That very night Belshazzar king of the Chaldeans was slain,

Treasury of Scripture

Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand.

made.

Genesis 40:20
And it came to pass the third day, which was Pharaoh's birthday, that he made a feast unto all his servants: and he lifted up the head of the chief butler and of the chief baker among his servants.

Esther 1:3
In the third year of his reign, he made a feast unto all his princes and his servants; the power of Persia and Media, the nobles and princes of the provinces, being before him:

Isaiah 21:4,5
My heart panted, fearfulness affrighted me: the night of my pleasure hath he turned into fear unto me…







Lexicon
[Many years later] King
מַלְכָּ֗א (mal·kā)
Noun - masculine singular determinate
Strong's Hebrew 4430: A king

Belshazzar
בֵּלְשַׁאצַּ֣ר (bê·lə·šaṣ·ṣar)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 1113: Belshazzar -- a Babylonian king

held
עֲבַד֙ (‘ă·ḇaḏ)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 5648: To do, make, prepare, keep

a great
רַ֔ב (raḇ)
Adjective - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7229: Abundant

feast
לְחֶ֣ם (lə·ḥem)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 3900: Bread, grain

for a thousand
אֲלַ֑ף (’ă·lap̄)
Number - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 506: A thousand

of his nobles,
לְרַבְרְבָנ֖וֹהִי (lə·raḇ·rə·ḇā·nō·w·hî)
Preposition-l | Noun - masculine plural construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 7261: Lord, noble

and he drank
שָׁתֵֽה׃ (šā·ṯêh)
Verb - Qal - Participle - masculine singular
Strong's Hebrew 8355: To imbibe

wine
חַמְרָ֥א (ḥam·rā)
Noun - masculine singular determinate
Strong's Hebrew 2562: Wine

with
וְלָקֳבֵ֥ל (wə·lā·qo·ḇêl)
Conjunctive waw, Preposition-l
Strong's Hebrew 6903: In front of, before, because of, because that

them.
אַלְפָּ֖א (’al·pā)
Number - masculine singular determinate
Strong's Hebrew 506: A thousand
V.

(1) Belshazzar.--On this king see Excursus C. As he was the son of Nabonidus, a space of about thirty years must have elapsed since the event recorded in the last chapter. The Babylonian empire survived the death of Nebuchadnezzar only twenty-five years.

A thousand.--There is nothing unreasonable in the number of the guests; in fact, the LXX. have doubled the number. (See Esther 1:3-4.)

Before the thousand.--The king appears to have had a special table reserved for himself apart from the guests. For this custom comp. Jeremiah 52:33.

Verses 1-31. - BELSHAZZAR'S FEAST. In regard to this chapter the peculiar state of the Septuagint text has to be noted. At the beginning of the chapter there are three verses which seem to be either variant versions of the Septuagint text, or versions of a text which was different from that from which the Septuagint has been drawn. Throughout the chapter, further, there are traces of doublets. Most of these variations occur in the Syriac of Paulus Tellensis. Verse 1. - Belshazzar the king made a great feast to a thousand of his lords, and drank wine before the thousand. As we have just indicated, there are two versions in the Septuagint of several verses in this chapter, and the verse before us is one of these. The first of these is "Baltasar the king made a great feast on the day of the dedication of his palace, and invited from his lords two thousand men." The other reading, which appears to have formed the text, is, "Baltasar the king made a great feast for his companions." The first version seems to have read the dual instead of the singular - a proof of the state of the language, for the dual has practically disappeared in the Targums. The second version has evidently read הברין instead of רברבין. Theodotion reads, "Baltasar the king made a great feast to thousands of his lords, and drank wine before the thousands." The Peshitta agrees with the Massoretic text. The numeral is thus omitted in the text of the Septuagint,inserted in the dual in the margin, and appears in Theodotion in the plural. As the shortest text is also the oldest, and omits the numeral, we feel inclined to do so also, the more so as the numeral may have resulted from אַעּלּפ (aluph) being put as the interpretation of רברב (rabrab). The clause in the marginal version, "on the day of the dedication of his palace," or, as it is rendered by Paulus Telleusis, "in the day of the dedication of the house of his kingdom," is worthy of notice. From the fact that early in his reign every Ninevite king seems to have begun a palace, this statement has a great deal of verisimilitude. The clause in the Massoretic text, "and drank wine before the thousand," is meaningless, unless as a rhetorical amplification. From the fact that only the first clause appears in the text of the Septuagint, the authenticity of the rest of the verse is rendered doubtful; the more so that קובלא () means "a feast" in Eastern Aramaic, though not in Western. It is a possible solution of the presence of the clause that קבל, excluded from the text and its place supplied by לחם, was placed in the margin. לקבל, however, means "before." If there was also in the margin אלפא, "thousands," in the emphatic state; as the translation into Hebrew of רברב (Genesis 36:17, 15 Onkelos). If, further, חברין, "companion," appeared as a various reading for רברבין, that would easily be read חמר, "wine;" the verb "to drink" would be added to complete the sense. We have thus all the elements to produce the different versions of the story of the feast. The fact that in what we regard as the marginal reading the clause appears quite differently rendered, confirms us in our suspicion that the Massoretic text presents a case of a "doublet." The reading which begins the chapter in the LXX. may be due to regarding קבל as the verb "to receive." The name Belshazzar has been the occasion of much controversy. It was regarded as one of the proofs of the non-historicity of Daniel that this name occurred at all (as Bertholdt). We were told that the last King of Babylon was Nabunahid, not Belshazzar. The name, however, has turned up in the Mugheir inscription as the son of Nabunahid, and not only so, but in a connection that implies he was associated in the government. From the annals of Nabunahid (2 col.; vide ' Beitrage zur As-syriologie,' Delitzsch and Haupt, 1891-92, pp. 218-221) we find that from his seventh to his eleventh year, if not from an earlier to a later date, Nabunahid was in retirement in Tema, and "came not to Babil," and the king's son (Mar Sarri) was with the nobles (rabuti) snd the army. Even when the king's mother died, the mourning was carried on by the king's sou, Belshazzar. Dr. Hugo Winckler ('Geschichte Babyloniens u. Assuriens,' pp. 315, 316) says Nabunahid remained intentionally far from the capital, and abode continually in Tema, a city otherwise unknown. Not once at the new year's feast, where his personal presence was indispensable, did he come to Babylon. What occasioned it, we know not; but it appears as if he had devoted himself to some kind of solitary life, and would not disturb himself with the business of government. Not once while Cyrus was marching against Babylon did he rouse himself, but allowed things to take their course. The government appears to have been carried on by his son, Bel-shar-utzur, for while Nabunahid lived in Tema in retirement, it is mentioned that his son, with the dignitaries, managed affairs in Babylon, and commanded the army. Also in several inscriptions in the concluding prayer, he is named along with his father, while it is usually the name of the king that is there mentioned. Belshazzar is, then, no mere luxurious despot, like the Nabeandel of Josephus, no incapable youth flushed with the unexpected dignity of government in the city of Babylon, while his father was shut up in Borsippa; he is a bold capable warrior. Tyrannical and imperious he may be, yet faithful to his father, as had Nebuchadnezzar been to Nabopolassar his father. We need not even look at the identifications of Belshazzar with Evil-Merodach, with Labasi-marduk, or with Nabunahid. The name Bel-shar-utzur means "Bel protects the king," and is rendered in the Greek versions "Baltasar," and in the Vulgate "Baltassar," and identical with the name given to Daniel, as we have remarked elsewhere. In the Peshitta the name here is rendered "Belit-shazar," while Daniel's Babylonian name is "Beletshazzar." We do not know when this feast took place. If we take the Septuagint text here as our guide, it did not take place at the capture of the city by Cyrus. If for five, six, or seven years he was practically king, Belshazzar may have built a palace, and the feast may have been held at its dedication. We knew that the Babylonians were notorious for their banquets - banquets that not infrcquently ended in drunkenness. Although the number of the guests is doubtful from diplomatic reasons, the number itself is not excessive. We read of Alexander the Great having ten thousand guests. 5:1-9 Belshazzar bade defiance to the judgments of God. Most historians consider that Cyrus then besieged Babylon. Security and sensuality are sad proofs of approaching ruin. That mirth is sinful indeed, which profanes sacred things; and what are many of the songs used at modern feasts better than the praises sung by the heathens to their gods! See how God struck terror upon Belshazzar and his lords. God's written word is enough to put the proudest, boldest sinner in a fright. What we see of God, the part of the hand that writes in the book of the creatures, and in the book of the Scriptures, should fill us with awful thoughts concerning that part which we do not see. If this be the finger of God, what is his arm when made bare? And what is He? The king's guilty conscience told him that he had no reason to expect any good news from heaven. God can, in a moment, make the heart of the stoutest sinner to tremble; and there needs no more than to let loose his own thoughts upon him; they will give him trouble enough. No bodily pain can equal the inward agony which sometimes seizes the sinner in the midst of mirth, carnal pleasures, and worldly pomp. Sometimes terrors cause a man to flee to Christ for pardon and peace; but many cry out for fear of wrath, who are not humbled for their sins, and who seek relief by lying vanities. The ignorance and uncertainty concerning the Holy Scriptures, shown by many who call themselves wise, only tend to drive sinners to despair, as the ignorance of these wise men did.
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OT Prophets: Daniel 5:1 Belshazzar the king made a great feast (Dan. Da Dn) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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