Hebrews 4:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Therefore, since the promise of entering his rest still stands, let us be careful that none of you be found to have fallen short of it.

New Living Translation
God's promise of entering his rest still stands, so we ought to tremble with fear that some of you might fail to experience it.

English Standard Version
Therefore, while the promise of entering his rest still stands, let us fear lest any of you should seem to have failed to reach it.

New American Standard Bible
Therefore, let us fear if, while a promise remains of entering His rest, any one of you may seem to have come short of it.

King James Bible
Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Therefore, while the promise to enter His rest remains, let us fear that none of you should miss it.

International Standard Version
Therefore, as long as the promise of entering his rest remains valid, let us be afraid! Otherwise, some of you will fail to reach it,

NET Bible
Therefore we must be wary that, while the promise of entering his rest remains open, none of you may seem to have come short of it.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Let us fear, therefore, lest, while The Promise of entering into his rest stands, any of you should be found to come short of entering.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
God's promise that we may enter his place of rest still stands. We are afraid that some of you think you won't enter his place of rest.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Let us, therefore, fear, lest a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.

King James 2000 Bible
Let us therefore fear, lest, although a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.

American King James Version
Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.

American Standard Version
Let us fear therefore, lest haply, a promise being left of entering into his rest, any one of you should seem to have come short of it.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Let us fear therefore lest the promise being left of entering into his rest, any of you should be thought to be wanting.

Darby Bible Translation
Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left of entering into his rest, any one of you might seem to have failed [of it].

English Revised Version
Let us fear therefore, lest haply, a promise being left of entering into his rest, any one of you should seem to have come short of it.

Webster's Bible Translation
Let us therefore fear, lest a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.

Weymouth New Testament
Therefore let us be on our guard lest perhaps, while He still leaves us a promise of being admitted to His rest, some one of you should be found to have fallen short of it.

World English Bible
Let us fear therefore, lest perhaps anyone of you should seem to have come short of a promise of entering into his rest.

Young's Literal Translation
We may fear, then, lest a promise being left of entering into His rest, any one of you may seem to have come short,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

4:1-10 The privileges we have under the gospel, are greater than any had under the law of Moses, though the same gospel for substance was preached under both Testaments. There have been in all ages many unprofitable hearers; and unbelief is at the root of all unfruitfulness under the word. Faith in the hearer is the life of the word. But it is a painful consequence of partial neglect, and of a loose and wavering profession, that they often cause men to seem to come short. Let us then give diligence, that we may have a clear entrance into the kingdom of God. As God finished his work, and then rested from it, so he will cause those who believe, to finish their work, and then to enjoy their rest. It is evident, that there is a more spiritual and excellent sabbath remaining for the people of God, than that of the seventh day, or that into which Joshua led the Jews. This rest is, a rest of grace, and comfort, and holiness, in the gospel state. And a rest in glory, where the people of God shall enjoy the end of their faith, and the object of all their desires. The rest, or sabbatism, which is the subject of the apostle's reasoning, and as to which he concludes that it remains to be enjoyed, is undoubtedly the heavenly rest, which remains to the people of God, and is opposed to a state of labour and trouble in this world. It is the rest they shall obtain when the Lord Jesus shall appear from heaven. But those who do not believe, shall never enter into this spiritual rest, either of grace here or glory hereafter. God has always declared man's rest to be in him, and his love to be the only real happiness of the soul; and faith in his promises, through his Son, to be the only way of entering that rest.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 1. - Let us fear, therefore, lest, a promise being still left of entering into his rest, any one of you should seem to have come short. This verse is a renewed warning against remissness, based (as is shown by the connecting οϋν) on the preceding argument, but introducing also, by means of the clause, καταλειπομένης, etc., a new thought, the elucidation of which is the subject of what follows. The new thought is that the true "rest of God," typified only by the rest of Canaan, remains still for the attainment of Christians. That this is the case has not yet been shown; and hence the clause, "a promise being still left." etc., does not point to a conclusion already arrived at, but to what is coming. The new thought is taken up in ver. 2, and what has been thus intimated in ver. 1 is asserted as a conclusion after proof in ver. 9. ἄρα ἀπολείπεται, etc. A different view of the drift of the warning in this verse, main-rained very decidedly by Ebrard, demands attention. It rests on the interpretation of δοκῇ ὑστερήκεναι, which is taken to mean "should think that he has come too late," i.e. for the promise of the rest, under the idea that its meaning had been exhausted in the rest of Canaan. It may be said in support of this view that such is the most obvious meaning of the phrase; that δοκεῖν in the New Testament most commonly means "think" or "suppose;" that the primary sense of ὑστερεῖν is that of being behindhand, either in place or in time; and that the perfect ὑστερήκεναι is thus accounted for, whereas, according to the usual interpretation, the whole phrase is unsuitable: why was not ὑστερήση written, if a mere warning against remissness was intended? Further, it may be said that what immediately follows is in favor of this view of the purport of the caution in ver. 1, being an evident carrying out of its idea. Thus the verse is supposed to be not at all a continuation of the previous hortatory section, but rather serving as the thesis of the coming argumentative section, though put in the form of a caution because imperfect appreciation of the view to be now established was at the root of the danger of the Hebrew Christians. Some of them at least did not fully grasp the true character of the gospel as being the fulfill-merit of the old dispensation, the realization of its types and promises. They were inclined to rest in the Law as a revelation to which the gospel was only supplementary, and hence to regard the promised land, the offer of which was before their time, as the only rest intended; and therefore the writer, after adducing the example of the Israelites under Moses as a warning against remissness, prefaces his exposition. of the true rest of God by a warning against misapprehending it. But against this view of the meaning of δοκῇ ὑστερήκεναι there are the following reasons:

(1) The word φοβήθωμεν suggests rather (like βλέπετε) a warning against conduct that might lead to forfeiture than a correction of an inadequate conception; and οϋν connects the warning with what has gone before, in which the view of what the true rest is has not entered.

(2) Though δοκεῖν is most frequently used in the New Testament in its sense of "thinking," "seeming to one's self," yet it has there, as in Greek generally, the sense also of "appearing," "seeming to others;" and certainly, as far as the word itself is concerned, may have this sense here. Also the verb ὑστερεῖν, though its primary idea (as of ὕστερος) is that of "coming after," is nevertheless invariably used in the New Testament to express "deficiency," or "falling short" (cf. especially in this Epistle, Hebrews 12:15): it is never elsewhere (though capable of the meaning) used to express lateness in time.

(3) The phrase, δοκῇ ὑστερήκεναι, in the sense of "seem to have fallen short" (rather than ὑστερήσῃ) is capable of being accounted for. One explanation of it, adopted by Alford, is indeed hardly tenable. He accounts for the past tense by supposing reference to the final judgment; taking it to mean, "lest any one of you should then appear [i.e. be found] to have fallen short." But the word δοκεῖν, which, however used, refers, not to what is made evident, but to what is thought or seems, refuses to be thus misinterpreted. It is better to take it as a softening expression. We may suppose that the writer (with a delicacy that reminds us of St. Paul) was unwilling to imply his own expectation of any failure; and so he only bids his readers beware of so living as even to present the appearance of it or suggest the thought of it to others. According to this view, the tense of ὑστερήκεναι is intelligible, the supposed deficiency spoken of being previous to its being perceived or suspected. It is not necessary to supply an understood genitive, such as "the promise," or "the rest," after ὑστερήκεναι. It may be used (as elsewhere) absolutely, to express deficiency or failure; i.e. in the conditions required for attainment. One view of its meaning is that it has reference to the idea of being behindhand in a race: but there is nothing in the context to suggest this figure.

(4) It is not necessary that ver. 1 should express only the idea of the following argument; it does sufficiently express it in the clause, καταλειπομέμης, etc.; and it is in the style of this Epistle to connect new trains of argument by a continuous chain of thought with what has gone before (cf. the beginning of Hebrews 2. and 3.). Though there is uncertainty as to the sequence of thought in the several clauses of the following argument (vers. 2-11), its general drift is clear. Its leading ideas are these: The invitation to enter God's rest contained in the psalm shows that the rest of Canaan, which, though forfeited under Moses, had long been actually attained under Joshua, was not the final rest intended. What, then, is meant by this remarkable term, "my rest," i.e. God's own rest? Our thoughts go back to the beginning of the Bible, where a rest of God himself is spoken of; where he is said to have rested on the seventh day from all his works. Participation, then, in that heavenly rest - a true sabbath rest with God - is what the term implies. Though this rest began "from the foundation of the world," man's destined share in if, however long delayed, was intimated by the typical history of the Israelites under Moses, and by the warning and renewed invitation of the psalm. This renewed invitation makes it plain that it is still attainable by God's people. It has at last been made attainable by Christ. who, as our great High Priest, has himself entered it, and leads us into it if we are but faithful.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Let us therefore fear,.... Not with a fear of wrath and damnation; nor with a fear of diffidence and distrust of the power, grace, and goodness of God; but with a cautious fear, a godly jealousy, a careful circumspection, and watchfulness:

lest a promise being left us of entering into his rest; not the land of Canaan, the type of heaven, but rather heaven itself, the ultimate glory: there is a rest of the body in the grave, from work, service, and labour, and from distempers and diseases, where it rests under the guardianship of the Spirit, until the resurrection morn; and there is a rest of the soul before the resurrection, in the arms of Christ, with whom it immediately is, upon its departure from the body; and there is a rest both of soul and body after the resurrection, from sin, from afflictions, from Satan's temptations, from unbelief, doubts, and fears, and from all enemies: and this may be called the rest of God, because he is the author and giver of it; and it will lie much in communion with him; and besides, heaven is the place of God's rest, Isaiah 66:1 and the possession and enjoyment of the heavenly glory is often signified by an entering into it: and there is a promise of this, which is left in Christ's hands, and shall never fail; though some who have hoped for it may come short of it, or at least seem to do so: but rather a rest under the Gospel dispensation is here intended, since it is a rest believers enter into now, Hebrews 4:3 and since the Gospel church is represented as a state of peace and rest, Isaiah 11:6 and which lies in a more clear and comfortable application of the blood and righteousness of Christ to the saints; in a freedom from a spirit of bondage to fear, and from the yoke of carnal ordinances, and in the enjoyment of Gospel privileges and ordinances; and this is God's rest, which he has provided for New Testament saints, and into which they enter by faith, and a profession of it; and the Gospel is the promise or declaration which was left among these Hebrews, and in the world, to encourage them so to do: lest

any of you should seem to come short of it; either of the promise, or the rest promised; which if understood of the heavenly glory, the sense is, that though true believers shall not come short of that, yet they may "seem" to others to do so; and therefore should be careful of their lives and conversations, that they might not seem to come short; and this they should do, for the glory of God, the honour of Christ and his Gospel, and the good of others; but if the rest, and the promise of it, intend the Gospel and its dispensation, the meaning is, that saints should be concerned so to behave, that they might not seem to fail of the doctrine of the grace of God, and to be disappointed of that rest and peace promised in it. One of Stephens's copies read, lest "any of us"; which seems most agreeable both to what goes before, and follows.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

CHAPTER 4

Heb 4:1-16. The Promise of God's Rest Is Fully Realized through Christ: Let Us Strive to Obtain It by Him, Our Sympathizing High Priest.

1. Let us … fear—not with slavish terror, but godly "fear and trembling" (Php 2:12). Since so many have fallen, we have cause to fear (Heb 3:17-19).

being left us—still remaining to us after the others have, by neglect, lost it.

his rest—God's heavenly rest, of which Canaan is the type. "To-day" still continues, during which there is the danger of failing to reach the rest. "To-day," rightly used, terminates in the rest which, when once obtained, is never lost (Re 3:12). A foretaste of the rest Is given in the inward rest which the believer's soul has in Christ.

should seem to come short of it—Greek, "to have come short of it"; should be found, when the great trial of all shall take place [Alford], to have fallen short of attaining the promise. The word "seem" is a mitigating mode of expression, though not lessening the reality. Bengel and Owen take it, Lest there should be any semblance or appearance of falling short.

Hebrews 4:1 Additional Commentaries
Context
A Sabbath-Rest for God's People
1Therefore, let us fear if, while a promise remains of entering His rest, any one of you may seem to have come short of it. 2For indeed we have had good news preached to us, just as they also; but the word they heard did not profit them, because it was not united by faith in those who heard.…
Cross References
Acts 3:19
Repent, then, and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out, that times of refreshing may come from the Lord,

2 Corinthians 6:1
As God's co-workers we urge you not to receive God's grace in vain.

Galatians 5:4
You who are trying to be justified by the law have been alienated from Christ; you have fallen away from grace.

Hebrews 12:15
See to it that no one falls short of the grace of God and that no bitter root grows up to cause trouble and defile many.
Treasury of Scripture

Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.

us therefore.

Hebrews 4:11 Let us labor therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall …

Hebrews 2:1-3 Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which …

Hebrews 12:15,25 Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any …

Hebrews 13:7 Remember them which have the rule over you, who have spoken to you …

Proverbs 14:16 A wise man fears, and departs from evil: but the fool rages, and is confident.

Proverbs 28:14 Happy is the man that fears always: but he that hardens his heart …

Jeremiah 32:40 And I will make an everlasting covenant with them, that I will not …

Romans 11:20 Well; because of unbelief they were broken off, and you stand by …

1 Corinthians 10:12 Why let him that thinks he stands take heed lest he fall.

a promise.

Hebrews 4:9 There remains therefore a rest to the people of God.

Numbers 14:34 After the number of the days in which you searched the land, even …

1 Samuel 2:30 Why the LORD God of Israel said, I said indeed that your house, and …

Romans 3:3,4 For what if some did not believe? shall their unbelief make the faith …

2 Timothy 2:13 If we believe not, yet he stays faithful: he cannot deny himself.

his.

Hebrews 4:3-5 For we which have believed do enter into rest, as he said, As I have …

See on ch.

Hebrews 3:11 So I swore in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.)

any.

Matthew 7:21-23,26,27 Not every one that said to me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom …

Matthew 24:48-51 But and if that evil servant shall say in his heart, My lord delays …

Matthew 25:1-3 Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened to ten virgins, which …

Luke 12:45,46 But and if that servant say in his heart, My lord delays his coming; …

Luke 13:25-30 When once the master of the house is risen up, and has shut to the …

Romans 3:23 For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;

1 Corinthians 9:26,27 I therefore so run, not as uncertainly; so fight I, not as one that …

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