1 Corinthians 7:2
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
But since sexual immorality is occurring, each man should have sexual relations with his own wife, and each woman with her own husband.

New Living Translation
But because there is so much sexual immorality, each man should have his own wife, and each woman should have her own husband.

English Standard Version
But because of the temptation to sexual immorality, each man should have his own wife and each woman her own husband.

Berean Study Bible
But because there is so much sexual immorality, each man should have his own wife, and each woman her own husband.

Berean Literal Bible
But because of sexual immorality, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have the own husband.

New American Standard Bible
But because of immoralities, each man is to have his own wife, and each woman is to have her own husband.

King James Bible
Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
But because sexual immorality is so common, each man should have his own wife, and each woman should have her own husband.

International Standard Version
Because sexual immorality is so rampant, every man should have his own wife, and every woman should have her own husband.

NET Bible
But because of immoralities, each man should have relations with his own wife and each woman with her own husband.

New Heart English Bible
But, because of sexual immoralities, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her own husband.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But because of fornication, let a man take a wife and a woman take her husband.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
But in order to avoid sexual sins, each man should have his own wife, and each woman should have her own husband.

New American Standard 1977
But because of immoralities, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her own husband.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

King James 2000 Bible
Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

American King James Version
Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

American Standard Version
But, because of fornications, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her own husband.

Douay-Rheims Bible
But for fear of fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

Darby Bible Translation
but on account of fornications, let each have his own wife, and each [woman] have her own husband.

English Revised Version
But, because of fornications, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her own husband.

Webster's Bible Translation
Nevertheless, to avoid lewdness, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

Weymouth New Testament
But because there is so much fornication every man should have a wife of his own, and every woman should have a husband.

World English Bible
But, because of sexual immoralities, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her own husband.

Young's Literal Translation
and because of the whoredom let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her proper husband;
Study Bible
Principles of Marriage
1Now for the matters you wrote about: It is good to abstain from sexual relations. 2But because there is so much sexual immorality, each man should have his own wife, and each woman her own husband. 3The husband should fulfill his marital duty to his wife, and likewise the wife to her husband.…
Cross References
Matthew 5:32
But I tell you that anyone who divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, brings adultery upon her. And whoever marries a divorced woman commits adultery.

1 Corinthians 7:1
Now for the matters you wrote about: It is good to abstain from sexual relations.

1 Corinthians 7:3
The husband should fulfill his marital duty to his wife, and likewise the wife to her husband.

1 Thessalonians 4:4
each of you must know how to control his own body in holiness and honor,
Treasury of Scripture

Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

to avoid.

1 Corinthians 7:9 But if they cannot contain, let them marry: for it is better to marry …

1 Corinthians 6:18 Flee fornication. Every sin that a man does is without the body; …

Proverbs 5:18,19 Let your fountain be blessed: and rejoice with the wife of your youth…

1 Timothy 4:3 Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats…

let.

Proverbs 18:22 Whoever finds a wife finds a good thing, and obtains favor of the LORD.

Proverbs 19:14 House and riches are the inheritance of fathers: and a prudent wife …

Malachi 2:14 Yet you say, Why? Because the LORD has been witness between you and …

Ephesians 5:28,33 So ought men to love their wives as their own bodies. He that loves …

(2) To avoid fornication.--Better, because of the (prevalent) fornication. This was so general in Corinth, and so little regarded as sin. that the unmarried were liable to be led into it.

It may at first sight appear as if the Apostle thus put marriage upon very low and merely utilitarian ground: but we must remember that he is here writing with a definite and limited aim, and does not enter into a general discussion of the subject. St. Paul gives a reason why those who wrote to him should marry, and the force of the argument does not extend beyond the immediate object in view. St. Paul's view of the higher aspects of matrimony are fully set forth when he treats of that subject generally (2Corinthians 11:2; Romans 7:4; Ephesians 5:25-32).

Verse 2. - Nevertheless. In this single word St. Paul practically refutes all the dangerous and unwarrantable inferences drawn by St. Jerome and others from the previous clause. St. Jerome argues: "If it is good for a man not to touch a woman, it must be bad to do so, and therefore celibacy is a holier state than marriage." He also says, "I suspect the goodness of a thing which the greatness of another evil enforces as a lesser evil." Such reasoning shows:

1. The danger of pressing words to the full extent of the logical inferences which may be deduced from them.

2. The errors which always arise from arguing upon isolated texts dissevered from their context, and from all consideration of the circumstances under which they were written.

3. The necessity of following the guidance of the Holy Spirit when he shows, by history and experience, the need for altering precepts with reference to altered conditions. There is in celibacy a moral beauty - it is kalon; there are cases in which it becomes a duty. But in most cases marriage, being no less a duty, as St. Paul proceeds to show, is even fairer and more excellent. Neither state, the wedded or the unwedded, is in itself more holy than the other. Each has its own honour and loveliness, and can only be judged of in connection with surrounding circumstances. Those who make St. Paul judge slightingly of marriage contradict his own express rules and statements (Ephesians 5:24, 31, 32; 1 Timothy 2:15), and make him speak the current heathen language of heathen epicures, who, to the great injury of morals, treated marriage as a disagreeable necessity, which was, if possible, to be avoided. If the "it is a good thing" of St. Paul in ver. 1 were to be taken absolutely, it would have to be corrected

(1) by the example of Christ, who beautified with his presence the marriage at Cana (John 2:1, 2);

(2) by the primeval law which said, "It is not good for man to be alone" (Genesis 2:18); and

(3) by the fact that marriage is the chosen analogue of the relation between Christ and his Church. But the very phrase he uses, as will be seen by reference to 1 Corinthians 9:15; Matthew 15:26; Romans 14:21, etc., is a relative not an absolute one, and St. Paul uses it here concessively, but with the object of pointing out limitations which almost reversed it. To avoid fornication; rather, because o f fornication; i.e. because of the many forms of impurity which were current every where, but especially at Corinth. Some have argued that St. Paul takes a "low" and "poor" view of marriage by regarding it only in the light of a remedy against fornication. The answer is:

1. That the reason which he assigns is a true reason in itself, and with reference to the masses of mankind; for which reason it is adopted by our Church in her Marriage Service.

2. He is addressing those who were living in a corrupt and semi-heathen atmosphere.

3. He is not here speaking of the idealized and spiritual aspect of marriage, but only of large practical necessities. When he speaks of marriage as a high Christian mystery (as in 2 Corinthians 11:2; Ephesians 5:22-33), he adopts a very different tone. Let every man have. A rule, not a mere permission. He here implies the truth that married love bears no analogy whatever to the vagae libidines of those who live like "natural brute beasts." In marriage the sensuous impulse, by being controlled and placed under religious sanctions is refined and purified from a degradation into a sacrament. Instead of being any longer the source of untold curses to mankind, it becomes the condition of their continuance and an element in their peace, because it is then placed under the blessing of God and of his Church. Nevertheless, to avoid fornication,.... Or "fornications"; meaning either the frequent commission of that sin; or all sorts of uncleanness and pollution, which may be avoided by wedlock, and the proper use of the marriage bed, where the gift of continency is not bestowed: wherefore to prevent unlawful copulations, as of single persons with one another, or of a married person with a single one, the apostle advises, as being what is right and proper,

let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband; that is, let every man that has a wife enjoy her, and make use of her, and let every woman that has an husband, receive him into her embraces; for these words are not to be understood of unmarried persons entering into a marriage state, for the words suppose them in such a state, but of the proper use of the marriage bed; and teach us that marriage, and the use of it, are proper remedies against fornication; and that carnal copulation of a man with a woman ought only to be of husband and wife, or of persons in a married state; and that all other copulations are sinful; and that polygamy is unlawful; and that one man is to have but one wife, and to keep to her; and that one woman is to have but one husband, and to keep to him. 2. Here the general rule is given

to avoid fornication—More literally, "on account of fornications," to which as being very prevalent at Corinth, and not even counted sins among the heathen, unmarried persons might be tempted. The plural, "fornications," marks irregular lusts, as contrasted with the unity of the marriage relation [Bengel].

let every man have—a positive command to all who have not the gift of continency, in fact to the great majority of the world (1Co 7:5). The dignity of marriage is set forth by Paul (Eph 5:25-32), in the fact that it signifies the mystical union between Christ and the Church.7:1-9 The apostle tells the Corinthians that it was good, in that juncture of time, for Christians to keep themselves single. Yet he says that marriage, and the comforts of that state, are settled by Divine wisdom. Though none may break the law of God, yet that perfect rule leaves men at liberty to serve him in the way most suited to their powers and circumstances, of which others often are very unfit judges. All must determine for themselves, seeking counsel from God how they ought to act.
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Alphabetical: and because But each have her his husband immoralities immorality is man much of own should since so there to wife woman

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