Romans 3:31
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
Do we, then, nullify the law by this faith? Not at all! Rather, we uphold the law.

New Living Translation
Well then, if we emphasize faith, does this mean that we can forget about the law? Of course not! In fact, only when we have faith do we truly fulfill the law.

English Standard Version
Do we then overthrow the law by this faith? By no means! On the contrary, we uphold the law.

Berean Study Bible
Do we, then, nullify the Law by this faith? By no means! Instead, we uphold the Law.

Berean Literal Bible
Do we, then, nullify the Law through faith? Never may it be! Instead, we uphold Law.

New American Standard Bible
Do we then nullify the Law through faith? May it never be! On the contrary, we establish the Law.

King James Bible
Do we then make void the law through faith? God forbid: yea, we establish the law.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Do we then cancel the law through faith? Absolutely not! On the contrary, we uphold the law.

International Standard Version
Do we, then, abolish the Law by this faith? Of course not! Instead, we uphold the Law.

NET Bible
Do we then nullify the law through faith? Absolutely not! Instead we uphold the law.

New Heart English Bible
Do we then nullify the law through faith? May it never be. No, we establish the law.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Are we eliminating The Written Law by faith? God forbid, but we are establishing The Written Law.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Are we abolishing Moses' Teachings by this faith? That's unthinkable! Rather, we are supporting Moses' Teachings.

New American Standard 1977
Do we then nullify the Law through faith? May it never be! On the contrary, we establish the Law.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Do we then make void the law through faith? No, in no wise; to the contrary, we establish the law.

King James 2000 Bible
Do we then make void the law through faith? God forbid: yea, we establish the law.

American King James Version
Do we then make void the law through faith? God forbid: yes, we establish the law.

American Standard Version
Do we then make the law of none effect through faith? God forbid: nay, we establish the law.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Do we, then, destroy the law through faith? God forbid: but we establish the law.

Darby Bible Translation
Do we then make void law by faith? Far be the thought: [no,] but we establish law.

English Revised Version
Do we then make the law of none effect through faith? God forbid: nay, we establish the law.

Webster's Bible Translation
Do we then make void the law through faith? By no means: but we establish the law.

Weymouth New Testament
Do we then by means of this faith abolish the Law? No, indeed; we give the Law a firmer footing.

World English Bible
Do we then nullify the law through faith? May it never be! No, we establish the law.

Young's Literal Translation
Law then do we make useless through the faith? let it not be! yea, we do establish law.
Study Bible
Righteousness through Faith
30since there is One God, who will justify the circumcised by faith and the uncircumcised through that same faith. 31Do we, then, nullify the Law by this faith? By no means! Instead, we uphold the Law.
Cross References
Matthew 5:17
Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them, but to fulfill them.

Luke 20:16
He will come and kill those tenants, and will give the vineyard to others." And when the people heard this, they said, "May such a thing never happen!"

Romans 2:20
an instructor of the foolish, a teacher of infants, because you have in the Law the embodiment of knowledge and truth--

Romans 3:4
Absolutely not! Let God be true and every man a liar. As it is written: "So that You may be justified in Your words, and prevail in Your judgments."

Romans 3:6
By no means! In that case, how could God judge the world?

Romans 8:4
so that the righteous standard of the Law might be fulfilled in us, who do not live according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.
Treasury of Scripture

Do we then make void the law through faith? God forbid: yes, we establish the law.

do we.

Romans 4:14 For if they which are of the law be heirs, faith is made void, and …

Psalm 119:126 It is time for you, LORD, to work: for they have made void your law.

Jeremiah 8:8,9 How do you say, We are wise, and the law of the LORD is with us? …

Matthew 5:17 Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am …

Matthew 15:6 And honor not his father or his mother, he shall be free. Thus have …

Galatians 2:21 I do not frustrate the grace of God: for if righteousness come by …

Galatians 3:17-19 And this I say, that the covenant, that was confirmed before of God …

God. [Me genoito,] literally, let it not be, and which might be rendered less objectionably, far from it, by no means.

See on

Romans 3:4 God forbid: yes, let God be true, but every man a liar; as it is …

yea.

Romans 7:7-14,22,25 What shall we say then? Is the law sin? God forbid. No, I had not …

Romans 8:4 That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk …

Romans 10:4 For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believes.

Romans 13:8-10 Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loves …

Psalm 40:8 I delight to do your will, O my God: yes, your law is within my heart.

Isaiah 42:21 The LORD is well pleased for his righteousness' sake; he will magnify …

Jeremiah 31:33,34 But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of …

Matthew 3:15 And Jesus answering said to him, Suffer it to be so now: for thus …

Matthew 5:20 For I say to you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the …

1 Corinthians 9:21 To them that are without law, as without law, (being not without law to God…

Galatians 2:19 For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live to God.

Galatians 5:18-23 But if you be led of the Spirit, you are not under the law…

Hebrews 10:15,16 Whereof the Holy Ghost also is a witness to us: for after that he …

James 2:8-12 If you fulfill the royal law according to the scripture, You shall …

(31) Do we then make void the law.--In opposition to many commentators it seems right to take this as an isolated statement to be worked out afterwards (Romans 6:1 et seq.) more fully. It cannot, without straining, be connected directly with what follows. The Apostle deals with two objections to his theory of justification by faith: (1) that there ought to be a different rule for the Jew and for the Gentile; (2) that if not, the law is practically abolished. He meets this latter by a contradiction, saying that it is not abolished, but confirmed. This is, however, drawing upon the stock of conclusions in his own mind to which he had come by process of meditation; the detailed proof is reserved.

Verse 31. - Do we then make law void through faith? God forbid: nay, we establish law. The question naturally arises after what has been said about justification being χωρὶς νόμου. Do we then make out our revealed Law, which we have accounted so holy and Divine, to be valueless? Or. rather, as the question is more generally put (νόμον being without the article, and therefore translated as above), "Do we make of none effect the whole principle of law, embodied to us in our Divine Law? Regarded erroneously as a principle of justification, the apostle might have answered. "Yes, we do." But any disparagement of it, regarded in its true light and as answering its real purpose, he meets with an indignant μὴ γένοιτο. On the contrary, he says, we establish it. Law means the declaration of righteousness, and requirement of conformity to it on the part of man. We establish this principle by our doctrine of the necessity of atonement for man's defect. We put law on its true base, and so make it the more to stand (ἰστάνομεν) by showing its office to be, not to justify - a position untenable - but to convince of sin, and so lead up to Christ (cf. Romans 7:12, etc.; Galatians 3:24). In pursuance of this thought, the apostle, in the next chapter, shows that in the Old Testament itself it is faith, and not law, which is regarded as justifying; as, in the first place and notably, in the case of Abraham; thus proving the previous assertion in Romans 3:21, Μαρτυρουμένη ὑπὸ τοῦ νόμου καὶ τῶν προφητῶν. In ch. 7. he treats the subject subjectively, analyzing the operation of law in the human soul, and so bringing out still more clearly its true meaning and purpose.



Do we then make void the law through faith?.... Which question is answered by way of detestatation,

God forbid! and by asserting the contrary,

yea, we establish the law. The law is not made void, neither by the grace nor doctrine of faith: not by the grace of faith; for that faith is not right which is not attended with works of righteousness; and those works are not right which do not flow from filth. Such a connection there is between faith and works; and so much do the one depend upon the other. Moreover, none but believers are capable of performing good works aright, and they do them, and they ought to do them: besides, faith, as a grace, looks to Christ, as the end of the law for righteousness, and therefore do not make it void. Nor is it made void by the doctrine of faith, and by the particular doctrine of a sinner's justification by faith in Christ's righteousness, which is here more especially intended; for though it is made void by it, as to any use of it for justification by the deeds thereof; yet its use in other respects is not set aside, such as to inform us of the mind and will of God, to discover and convince of sin, to show believers their deformity and imperfection, to render Christ and his righteousness more valuable, and to be a rule of walk and conversation to them; and it still remains a cursing and condemning law to Christless sinners, though justified ones are delivered from it as such: yea, the law is so far from being made void, that it is established by this doctrine; for by it the perpetuity of it is asserted, the spirituality of it is acknowledged, the perfect righteousness of it is secured: according to this doctrine all its demands are answered; whatever it requires it has, such as holiness of nature, perfect obedience to its precepts, and its full penalty borne: it is placed in the best hands, where it will ever remain; and a regard to it is enforced under the best influence, by the best of motives, and from the best of principles. It is indeed abolished as a covenant of works, and in this sense is made void to believers; and it is done away as to the form of administration of it by Moses; and it is destroyed as a yoke of bondage; and the people of God are free from the malediction of it, and condemnation by it, and so from its terror; yet it remains unalterable and unchangeable in the hands of Christ; the matter of it is always the same, and ever obligatory on believers, who, though they are freed from the curse of it, are not exempted from obedience to it: wherefore the law is not made void, so as to be destroyed and abolished in every sense, or to be rendered idle, inactive, useless, and insignificant; but, on the contrary, is made to stand, is placed on a sure basis and firm foundation, as the words used signify. 31. Do we then make void the law through faith?—"Does this doctrine of justification by faith, then, dissolve the obligation of the law? If so, it cannot be of God. But away with such a thought, for it does just the reverse."

God forbid: yea, we establish the law—It will be observed here, that, important as was this objection, and opening up as it did so noble a field for the illustration of the peculiar glory of the Gospel, the apostle does no more here than indignantly repel it, intending at a subsequent stage of his argument (Ro 6:1-23) to resume and discuss it at length.

Note, (1) It is a fundamental requisite of all true religion that it tend to humble the sinner and exalt God; and every system which breeds self-righteousness, or cherishes boasting, bears falsehood on its face (Ro 3:27, 28). (2) The fitness of the Gospel to be a universal religion, beneath which the guilty of every name and degree are invited and warranted to take shelter and repose, is a glorious evidence of its truth (Ro 3:29, 30). (3) The glory of God's law, in its eternal and immutable obligations, is then only fully apprehended by the sinner, and then only is it enthroned in the depths of his soul, when, believing that "He was made sin for him who knew no sin," he sees himself "made the righteousness of God in Him" (2Co 5:21). Thus do we not make void the law through faith: yea, we establish the law. (4) This chapter, and particularly the latter part of it, "is the proper seat of the Pauline doctrine of Justification, and the grand proof-passage of the Protestant doctrine of the Imputation of Christ's righteousness and of Justification not on account of, but through faith alone" [Philippi]. To make good this doctrine, and reseat it in the faith and affection of the Church, was worth all the bloody struggles that it cost our fathers, and it will be the wisdom and safety, the life and vigor of the churches, to "stand fast in this liberty wherewith Christ hath made them free, and not be again entangled"—in the very least degree—"with the yoke of bondage" (Ga 5:1). 3:27-31 God will have the great work of the justification and salvation of sinners carried on from first to last, so as to shut out boasting. Now, if we were saved by our own works, boasting would not be excluded. But the way of justification by faith for ever shuts out boasting. Yet believers are not left to be lawless; faith is a law, it is a working grace, wherever it is in truth. By faith, not in this matter an act of obedience, or a good work, but forming the relation between Christ and the sinner, which renders it proper that the believer should be pardoned and justified for the sake of the Saviour, and that the unbeliever who is not thus united or related to him, should remain under condemnation. The law is still of use to convince us of what is past, and to direct us for the future. Though we cannot be saved by it as a covenant, yet we own and submit to it, as a rule in the hand of the Mediator.
Jump to Previous
Abolish Clear Contrary Establish Faith Far Footing Forbid Indeed Law Means Nullify Overthrow Rather Thought Uphold Useless Void Way
Jump to Next
Abolish Clear Contrary Establish Faith Far Footing Forbid Indeed Law Means Nullify Overthrow Rather Thought Uphold Useless Void Way
Links
Romans 3:31 NIV
Romans 3:31 NLT
Romans 3:31 ESV
Romans 3:31 NASB
Romans 3:31 KJV

Romans 3:31 Biblia Paralela
Romans 3:31 Chinese Bible
Romans 3:31 French Bible
Romans 3:31 German Bible

Alphabetical: all at be by contrary Do establish faith it law May never Not nullify On Rather the then this through uphold we

NT Letters: Romans 3:31 Do we then nullify the law through (Rom. Ro) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
Romans 3:30
Top of Page
Top of Page