Luke 4:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, left the Jordan and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

New Living Translation
Then Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan River. He was led by the Spirit in the wilderness,

English Standard Version
And Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness

New American Standard Bible
Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led around by the Spirit in the wilderness

King James Bible
And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Then Jesus returned from the Jordan, full of the Holy Spirit, and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness

International Standard Version
Then Jesus, filled with the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan. He was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

NET Bible
Then Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan River and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But Yeshua, being full of The Spirit of Holiness, returned from the Jordan and The Spirit led him into the wilderness

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Jesus was filled with the Holy Spirit as he left the Jordan River. The Spirit led him while he was in the desert,

Jubilee Bible 2000
And Jesus being full of the Holy Spirit returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness

King James 2000 Bible
And Jesus being full of the Holy Spirit returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

American King James Version
And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

American Standard Version
And Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led in the Spirit in the wilderness

Douay-Rheims Bible
AND Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the desert,

Darby Bible Translation
But Jesus, full of [the] Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness

English Revised Version
And Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness

Webster's Bible Translation
And Jesus being full of the Holy Spirit, returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

Weymouth New Testament
Then Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led about by the Spirit in the Desert for forty days,

World English Bible
Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness

Young's Literal Translation
And Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, turned back from the Jordan, and was brought in the Spirit to the wilderness,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

4:1-13 Christ's being led into the wilderness gave an advantage to the tempter; for there he was alone, none were with him by whose prayers and advice he might be helped in the hour of temptation. He who knew his own strength might give Satan advantage; but we may not, who know our own weakness. Being in all things made like unto his brethren, Jesus would, like the other children of God, live in dependence upon the Divine Providence and promise. The word of God is our sword, and faith in that word is our shield. God has many ways of providing for his people, and therefore is at all times to be depended upon in the way of duty. All Satan's promises are deceitful; and if he is permitted to have any influence in disposing of the kingdoms of the world and the glory of them, he uses them as baits to insnare men to destruction. We should reject at once and with abhorrence, every opportunity of sinful gain or advancement, as a price offered for our souls; we should seek riches, honours, and happiness in the worship and service of God only. Christ will not worship Satan; nor, when he has the kingdoms of the world delivered to him by his Father, will he suffer any remains of the worship of the devil to continue in them. Satan also tempted Jesus to be his own murderer, by unfitting confidence in his Father's protection, such as he had no warrant for. Let not any abuse of Scripture by Satan or by men abate our esteem, or cause us to abandon its use; but let us study it still, seek to know it, and seek our defence from it in all kinds of assaults. Let this word dwell richly in us, for it is our life. Our victorious Redeemer conquered, not for himself only, but for us also. The devil ended all the temptation. Christ let him try all his force, and defeated him. Satan saw it was to no purpose to attack Christ, who had nothing in him for his fiery darts to fasten upon. And if we resist the devil, he will flee from us. Yet he departed but till the season when he was again to be let loose upon Jesus, not as a tempter, to draw him to sin, and so to strike at his head, at which he now aimed and was wholly defeated in; but as a persecutor, to bring Christ to suffer, and so to bruise his heel, which it was told him, he should have to do, and would do, though it would be the breaking of his own head, Ge 3:15. Though Satan depart for a season, we shall never be out of his reach till removed from this present evil world.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 1-13. - THE TEMPTATION. The consecration of our Lord in his baptism was immediately followed by what is known as his temptation. It is, perhaps, the most mysterious and least understood of any of the scenes of the public ministry related by the evangelists. It is related at some length by SS. Matthew and Luke, with very slight difference of detail, the principal one being the order in which the three great temptations occurred. In St. Mark the notice of this strange episode in the life is very short, but harmonizes perfectly with the longer accounts of SS. Matthew and Luke. St John omits it altogether; first, because, with the earlier written Gospels before him, he was aware that the Church of his Master already possessed ample details of the occurrence; and secondly, the story and lessons of the temptation did not enter into the plan which St. John had before him when he composed his history of his Lord's teaching. What, now, was the temptation? Did the evil one appear to Jesus actually in a bodily form? Did his feet really press some elevation, such as the summit of snowy Hermon, or the still more inaccessible peak of Ararat? and did the far-reaching prospect of sea and land, mountain and valley, bathed in the noonday glory of an Eastern sun, represent to him the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them? Did be in very truth stand on the summit of the great temple-roof, and from that dizzy height gaze on the crowds below, crawling like ants across the sacred court, or toiling along the Jerusalem streets? So generally thought the ancients, and so it would appear, on first thoughts, from St. Matthew's account, where we read (Matthew 4:3), "The tempter came to him.;" and the vivid realistic imagery of St. Mark (Mark 1:12, 13) would rather help us to the same conclusion. Some expositors and students of the Word have imagined - for it comes to little more - that the devil manifested himself to Jesus under the guise of an angel of light; others prove supposed the tempter came to him as a wayfaring man; others, as a priest, as one of the Sanhedrin council. But on further consideration all this seems highly improbable. No appearance of the devil, or of any evil angel, is ever related in the Bible records. The mountain whence the view of the world's kingdoms was obtained after all is fanciful, and any realistic interpretation is thoroughly unsatisfactory and improbable. The greater of the modern scholars of different countries - the Germans Olshausen and Neander, the Dutch Van Oosterzee, the Frenchman Pressense, the Swiss Godet, Farrar and Plumptre in our own land - reject altogether the idea of a presence of the tempter visible to the eye of sense. The whole transaction lay in the spiritual region of the life of Christ, but on that account it was not the less real and true. Nor is it by any means a solitary experience, this living, beholding, listening, and even speaking in the Spirit, narrated by the evangelist in this place as a circumstance in the Lord's life. Centuries before, Ezekiel, when in his exile by the banks of Chebar in Chaldea, was lifted up and borne by the Spirit to far-distant Jerusalem, that he might see the secret sins done in the temple of the Lord (Ezekiel 8:3). Isaiah again, in the year that King Uzziah died, saw the Lord on his throne, surrounded by seraphim; in this vision the prophet speaks, and hears the Lord speak, and a burning coal from off the altar is laid on his mouth (Isaiah 6:1-11). To pass over the several visions of Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, and others, in which the transactions lay altogether in the spiritual region of their lives, we would instance from the New Testament St. Paul's account of himself caught up into paradise, "whether in the body or out of the body" he could not tell (2 Corinthians 12:1-4). And still more to the point, St. John's words prefacing his Revelation, how he was "in the Spirit on the Lord's day," when he heard the voice behind him, and saw his glorified Master. On that day and in that hour he heard and saw what he relates in his twenty-two chapters of the Revelation. In language very slightly different, the temptation of the blessed Son of God is related by the evangelists, when they preface the history of the event with the words, "Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost... was led by the Spirit into the wilderness" (see, too, Matthew 4:1). We conclude, then, with some confidence, that the devil did not appear to Jesus in a bodily form, but that, in a higher sphere than that of matter, the Redeemer met and encountered - with the result we know so well - that spiritual being of superhuman but yet of limited power, who tempts men to evil, and accuses them before the throne of God when they have yielded to the temptation. "We believe" - to use Godet's words here - "that had he been observed by any spectator whilst the temptation was going on, he would have appeared all through it motionless upon the soil of the desert. But though the conflict did not pass out of the spiritual sphere, it was none the less real, and the value of the victory was none the less incalculable and decisive." Verse 1. - And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness; more accurately translated, in the Spirit. The question of the nature of the temptation has been discussed in the above note. The words, "full of the Holy Ghost," and "was led by the Spirit," lead us irresistibly to the conclusion that the Lord, during this strange solemn time - like Ezekiel, Daniel, Isaiah, and, later, Paul and John the beloved apostle - was especially under the influence of the Holy Spirit; that his eyes were open to see visions and sights not usually visible to mortal eye; and that his ears were unlocked to hear voices not audible to ordinary mortal ears. Tradition has fixed upon a hill district bordering on the road which leads up from Jericho to Jerusalem, as the scene of the temptation. The hill itself, from being the supposed spot where the Lord spent these forty days, is named Quarantania. The rocks in this neighborhood contain many caves.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost,.... The Spirit of God having descended on him at his baptism, and afresh anointed, and filled his human nature with his gifts, whereby, as man, he was abundantly furnished for the great work of the public ministry, he was just about to enter upon; yet must first go through a series of temptations, and which, through the fulness of the Holy Spirit in him, he was sufficiently fortified against.

Returned from Jordan; where he came, and had been with John, and was baptized by him; which, when over, he went back from the same side of Jordan, to which he came:

and was led by the Spirit; the same Spirit, or Holy Ghost he was full of; See Gill on Matthew 4:1.

into the wilderness; of Judea, which lay near Jordan, and where John had been preaching and baptizing, namely, in the habitable: part of it: but this was that part, which was uninhabited by men, and was infested with wild beasts, and where Christ could neither have the comfort and benefit of human society, nor any thing for the sustenance of life, and where he was exposed to the utmost danger; and so in circumstances very opportune and favourable for Satan to ply him with his temptations, for which purpose he was led thither.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

CHAPTER 4

Lu 4:1-13. Temptation of Christ.

(See on [1564]Mt 4:1-11.)

Luke 4:1 Additional Commentaries
Context
The Temptation of Jesus
1Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led around by the Spirit in the wilderness 2for forty days, being tempted by the devil. And He ate nothing during those days, and when they had ended, He became hungry.…
Cross References
Matthew 4:1
Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.

Mark 1:12
At once the Spirit sent him out into the wilderness,

Mark 1:13
and he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. He was with the wild animals, and angels attended him.

Luke 3:3
He went into all the country around the Jordan, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.

Luke 3:38
the son of Enosh, the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God.
Treasury of Scripture

And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,

A.M.

Matthew 4:1 Then was Jesus led up of the spirit into the wilderness to be tempted …

full.

Luke 4:14,18 And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee: and there …

Luke 3:22 And the Holy Ghost descended in a bodily shape like a dove on him, …

Isaiah 11:2-4 And the spirit of the LORD shall rest on him, the spirit of wisdom …

Isaiah 61:1 The Spirit of the Lord GOD is on me; because the LORD has anointed …

Matthew 3:16 And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: …

John 1:32 And John bore record, saying, I saw the Spirit descending from heaven …

John 3:34 For he whom God has sent speaks the words of God: for God gives not …

Acts 1:2 Until the day in which he was taken up, after that he through the …

Acts 10:38 How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: …

and was.

Luke 2:27 And he came by the Spirit into the temple: and when the parents brought …

1 Kings 18:12 And it shall come to pass, as soon as I am gone from you, that the …

Ezekiel 3:14 So the spirit lifted me up, and took me away, and I went in bitterness, …

Mark 1:12 And immediately the spirit drives him into the wilderness.

Acts 8:39 And when they were come up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord …

wilderness.

1 Kings 19:4 But he himself went a day's journey into the wilderness, and came …

Mark 1:13 And he was there in the wilderness forty days, tempted of Satan; …

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