Job 8:17
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New International Version
it entwines its roots around a pile of rocks and looks for a place among the stones.

New Living Translation
Its roots grow down through a pile of stones; it takes hold on a bed of rocks.

English Standard Version
His roots entwine the stone heap; he looks upon a house of stones.

New American Standard Bible
"His roots wrap around a rock pile, He grasps a house of stones.

King James Bible
His roots are wrapped about the heap, and seeth the place of stones.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
His roots are intertwined around a pile of rocks. He looks for a home among the stones.

International Standard Version
Its roots weave around a pile of stones, seeking to entrench itself among the rocks.

NET Bible
It wraps its roots around a heap of stones and it looks for a place among stones.

New Heart English Bible
His roots are wrapped around the rock pile. He sees the place of stones.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Its roots weave through a pile of stones. They cling to a stone house.

JPS Tanakh 1917
His roots are wrapped about the heap, He beholdeth the place of stones.

New American Standard 1977
“His roots wrap around a rock pile,
            He grasps a house of stones.

Jubilee Bible 2000
his roots weave themselves around a spring and secure themselves even in a stony place.

King James 2000 Bible
His roots are wrapped about the stone heap, and looks for a place in the stones.

American King James Version
His roots are wrapped about the heap, and sees the place of stones.

American Standard Version
His roots are wrapped about the'stone -heap, He beholdeth the place of stones.

Douay-Rheims Bible
His roots shall be thick upon a heap of stones, and among the stones he shall abide.

Darby Bible Translation
His roots are entwined about the stoneheap; he seeth the place of stones.

English Revised Version
His roots are wrapped about the heap, he beholdeth the place of stones.

Webster's Bible Translation
His roots are wrapped about the heap, and seeth the place of stones.

World English Bible
His roots are wrapped around the rock pile. He sees the place of stones.

Young's Literal Translation
By a heap his roots are wrapped, A house of stones he looketh for.
(17) His roots are wrapped about.--This is the cause of his continual luxuriance, that his roots receive moisture from below, where they are wrapped about the spring which fertilises them underneath; they are planted near to a perennial fountain, and therefore (see Job 8:6) "he is green before the sun."

And seeth the place of stones.--Rather, the house of stones--i.e., the stone house. He seeth the permanent and durable edifice of stone which is the habitation of civilisation and culture, and here his holding is so firm that, even if plucked up, his roots and suckers are so numerous that they leave behind them descendants and offshoots, so that out of his earth others grow; or, more correctly, out of another dust they grow. Even if transplanted, this luxuriant tree will flourish equally well in another soil.

Verse 17. - His roots are wrapped about the heap, and seeth (rather, he seeth) the place (literally, house) of stones. This passage is very obscure The word gal, translated heap, means sometimes a spring or stream of water (Song of Solomon 4:12); and many of the best Hebraists regard it as having that meaning here (Buxtorf, Lee, Stanley Leathes, Revised Version). In this case we have to regard the rapidly growing plant as having its roots wrapped about the perennial spring, which was a not uncommon, and always a much-desired, feature of an Eastern garden. Thus nourished, it naturally increased and spread itself, and "was green before the sun." May we suppose that it "saw the house of stones," because the spring which nourished it gushed forth from the native rock so that its roots were in contact with both? His roots are wrapped about the heap,.... The heap of stones where the tree stands; it strikes its roots among them, and implicates and twists them about them, and secures itself and grows up notwithstanding them: and this expresses the seeming stable state and condition of hypocrites for a season, who not only flourish, but seem to take root; and who maintain their ground amidst some difficulties; this fitly agrees with and describes such hearers of the word, and professors of religion, comparable to the seed sown on stony ground, Matthew 13:5,

and seeth the place of stones; or, "the house of stones" (n); a house built of stones, high and stately; yet this tree rises higher than that, overtops and overlooks it; and is represented as viewing it thoroughly, or looking down upon it, and all around it, being so high and so spreading; the Targum renders it, implicateth the house of stones; "platteth", as Mr. Broughton, or twists about them, and so many of the Jewish writers; but this seems to be designed in the former clause: all this suits very well with good men, whose "roots are wrapped about the fountain" (o); as the words may be rendered; about the love of God, in which they are rooted and grounded, and are like trees planted by rivers of water, the river of divine love, which refreshes, revives, and makes them fruitful; and about Christ, the fountain of gardens and well of living waters; in whom they are rooted and built up, increase, flourish, and are established; and though they are among stones, and attended with many difficulties, yet they abide and surmount all; believe in hope against hope, and see and enjoy, yea, even dwell in the house of stones, the church of God, built on a rock, against which the gates of hell cannot prevail.

(n) "domum lapidum", Montanus, Cocceius, Schmidt, Michaelis, Schultens; so Tigurine version, Codurcus, Junius & Tremellius. (o) "juxta fontem", Pagninus, Mercerus; so Vatablus, Piscator, Gersom, and Bar Tzemach. 17. seeth the place of stones—Hebrew, "the house of stones"; that is, the wall surrounding the garden. The parasite plant, in creeping towards and over the wall—the utmost bound of the garden—is said figuratively to "see" or regard it.8:8-19 Bildad discourses well of hypocrites and evil-doers, and the fatal end of all their hopes and joys. He proves this truth of the destruction of the hopes and joys of hypocrites, by an appeal to former times. Bildad refers to the testimony of the ancients. Those teach best that utter words out of their heart, that speak from an experience of spiritual and divine things. A rush growing in fenny ground, looking very green, but withering in dry weather, represents the hypocrite's profession, which is maintained only in times of prosperity. The spider's web, spun with great skill, but easily swept away, represents a man's pretensions to religion when without the grace of God in his heart. A formal professor flatters himself in his own eyes, doubts not of his salvation, is secure, and cheats the world with his vain confidences. The flourishing of the tree, planted in the garden, striking root to the rock, yet after a time cut down and thrown aside, represents wicked men, when most firmly established, suddenly thrown down and forgotten. This doctrine of the vanity of a hypocrite's confidence, or the prosperity of a wicked man, is sound; but it was not applicable to the case of Job, if confined to the present world.
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