Genesis 1:4
Parallel Verses
New International Version
God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness.

New Living Translation
And God saw that the light was good. Then he separated the light from the darkness.

English Standard Version
And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness.

New American Standard Bible
God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness.

King James Bible
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
God saw that the light was good, and God separated the light from the darkness.

International Standard Version
God saw that the light was beautiful. He separated the light from the darkness,

NET Bible
God saw that the light was good, so God separated the light from the darkness.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
God saw the light was good. So God separated the light from the darkness.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And God saw that the light was good, and God divided the light from the darkness.

King James 2000 Bible
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

American King James Version
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

American Standard Version
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And God saw the light that it was good; and he divided the light from the darkness.

Darby Bible Translation
And God saw the light that it was good; and God divided between the light and the darkness.

English Revised Version
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

Webster's Bible Translation
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

World English Bible
God saw the light, and saw that it was good. God divided the light from the darkness.

Young's Literal Translation
And God seeth the light that it is good, and God separateth between the light and the darkness,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

1:3-5 God said, Let there be light; he willed it, and at once there was light. Oh, the power of the word of God! And in the new creation, the first thing that is wrought in the soul is light: the blessed Spirit works upon the will and affections by enlightening the understanding. Those who by sin were darkness, by grace become light in the Lord. Darkness would have been always upon fallen man, if the Son of God had not come and given us understanding, 1Jo 5:20. The light which God willed, he approved of. God divided the light from the darkness; for what fellowship has light with darkness? In heaven there is perfect light, and no darkness at all; in hell, utter darkness, and no gleam of light. The day and the night are the Lord's; let us use both to his honour, by working for him every day, and resting in him every night, meditating in his law both day and night.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 4. - And God saw the light, that it was good. The anthropomorphism of this verse is suggestive, as teaching that from the first the absolute and all-sufficient Elohim was an intelligent Spectator of the operation of his own laws and forces, and was profoundly interested in the results which they achieved - an amount and degree of interference with the vast machine of nature which would satisfy any rational theist of today. God saw, i.e. examined and judged the newly-finished product, investigated its nature and its properties, contemplated its uses, admired its excellences, noted its correspondence with his own Divine idea; and in all these respects he pronounced it good. Afterwards it is the particular arrangement effected, or condition induced, by the creative word that evokes the Divine commendation; here it is the creature itself - "perhaps as the one object in nature which forms the fittest representation of the Creator himself, who is Light, and in whom is no darkness at all (1 John 1:5), and of the true Light, which lighteth every man (John 1:9)" (Macdonald). And God divided between the light and the darkness. The celestial, bodies not having been constituted light-holders for the earth until the fourth day forbids the supposition that the luminous matter, on being eliminated from the chaotic mass, was forthwith transported towards and concentrated in the sun. The sun itself, it is now well known, is "a solid mass of highly igneous matter engirt by a bed of dense clouds, on the top of which there lies, encircling all, a floating phosphorescent or luminous atmosphere, the lower part of it splendid, but the upper of luster altogether dazzling, from which streams the flood of light that enlivens all surrounding spheres" (Nichol's 'Cyclopedia,' art. Sun). "If, therefore, with Laplace, we may assume that the physical history of the sun was the archetype of that of the various planetary bodies that compose our system, we must think of them also, in the process of condensation, developing luminous atmospheres, which would continue encircling them, and in fact making them suns, until, through their further condensation, those phosphorescent bands were broken up, and, becoming disengaged from their parent globes, were attracted towards, and subsequently centralized in, the photosphere of the sun. So far as our earth is concerned, that happened on the fourth day. On the first day the light would either ensphere it in a radiant cloud, or exist apart from it, like a sun, though always in the plane of its orbit" (Delitzsch). If the former, then manifestly, though revolving on its axis, the earth would not experience the vicissitude of day and night, which some conjecture was not at this time established; if the latter, then the same succession of light and darkness would be begun as was afterwards rendered permanent by the fourth day's work. The chief reasons for the latter alternative are the supposed necessity of understanding the term day as a period of twenty-four hours, and the apparent impossibility of explaining how the light could be divided from the darkness otherwise than by the diurnal revolution of the earth. The Hiphil of בָּדַל, however, means to disjoin what was previously mixed, and may simply refer to the separation of the luminous particles from the opaque mass. By that very act the light was divided from the darkness. It was henceforth to be no more commingled. "The light denotes all that is simply illuminating in its efficacy, all the luminous element; the darkness denotes all that is untransparent, dark, shadow-casting; both together denote the polarity of the created world as it exists between the light-formations and the night-formations - the constitution of the day and night" (Lange).

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

And God saw the light, that it was good,.... Very pleasant and delightful, useful and beneficial; that is, he foresaw it would be good, of great service, as Picherellus (k) interprets it; for as yet there were no inhabitants of the earth to receive any advantage by it; see Ecclesiastes 11:7 besides, it was doubtless good to answer some present purposes, to prepare for the work of the two following days, before the great luminary was formed; as to dispel the darkness of heaven, and that which covered the deep; to rarefy, exhale, and draw up the lighter parts of the chaos, in order to form the wide extended ether, the expanded air, and the surrounding atmosphere, while the Spirit of God was agitating the waters, and separating them from the earthy parts; and which also might serve to unite and harden those which were to form the dry land, and also to warm that when it appeared, that it might bring forth grass, herbs, and fruit trees:

and God divided the light from the darkness: by which it should seem that they were mixed together, the particles of light and darkness; but "by what way is the light parted", severed and divided from darkness, is a question put to men by the Lord himself, who only can answer it, Job 38:24 he has so divided one from the other that they are not together at the same place and time; when light is in one hemisphere, darkness is in the other (l); and the one by certain constant revolutions is made to succeed the other; and by the motion of the one, the other gives way; as well as also God has divided and distinguished them by calling them by different names, as Aben Ezra, and is what next follows:

(k) In Cosmopoeiam, p. 267. (l) Milton in the place above referred to says, it was divided by the hemisphere. Paradise Lost, B. 7. l. 243, &c.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

4. divided the light from darkness—refers to the alternation or succession of the one to the other, produced by the daily revolution of the earth round its axis.

Genesis 1:4 Additional Commentaries
Context
The First Day: Light
3Then God said, "Let there be light"; and there was light. 4God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness. 5God called the light day, and the darkness He called night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.
Cross References
Psalm 145:9
The LORD is good to all; he has compassion on all he has made.

Psalm 145:10
All your works praise you, LORD; your faithful people extol you.

Isaiah 45:7
I form the light and create darkness, I bring prosperity and create disaster; I, the LORD, do all these things.
Treasury of Scripture

And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

that.

Genesis 1:10,12,18,25,31 And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of …

Ecclesiastes 2:13 Then I saw that wisdom excels folly, as far as light excels darkness.

Ecclesiastes 11:7 Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes …

the light from the darkness. Heb. between the light and between the darkness.

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