Deuteronomy 24:10
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
When you make a loan of any kind to your neighbor, do not go into their house to get what is offered to you as a pledge.

New Living Translation
"If you lend anything to your neighbor, do not enter his house to pick up the item he is giving as security.

English Standard Version
“When you make your neighbor a loan of any sort, you shall not go into his house to collect his pledge.

New American Standard Bible
"When you make your neighbor a loan of any sort, you shall not enter his house to take his pledge.

King James Bible
When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
When you make a loan of any kind to your neighbor, do not enter his house to collect what he offers as security.

International Standard Version
"When you loan something to your neighbor, don't enter his house to seize what he offered as collateral.

NET Bible
When you make any kind of loan to your neighbor, you may not go into his house to claim what he is offering as security.

New Heart English Bible
When you do lend your neighbor any kind of loan, you shall not go into his house to get his pledge.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
When you make a loan to your neighbor, don't go into his house to take a security deposit.

JPS Tanakh 1917
When thou dost lend thy neighbour any manner of loan, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

New American Standard 1977
“When you make your neighbor a loan of any sort, you shall not enter his house to take his pledge.

Jubilee Bible 2000
When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to take his pledge.

King James 2000 Bible
When you do lend your brother anything, you shall not go into his house to get his pledge.

American King James Version
When you do lend your brother any thing, you shall not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

American Standard Version
When thou dost lend thy neighbor any manner of loan, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

Douay-Rheims Bible
When thou shalt demand of thy neighbour any thing that he oweth thee, thou shalt not go into his house to take away a pledge :

Darby Bible Translation
When thou dost lend thy brother anything, thou shalt not go into his house to secure his pledge.

English Revised Version
When thou dost lend thy neighbour any manner of loan, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

Webster's Bible Translation
When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to take his pledge:

World English Bible
When you do lend your neighbor any kind of loan, you shall not go into his house to get his pledge.

Young's Literal Translation
'When thou liftest up on thy brother a debt of anything, thou dost not go in unto his house to obtain his pledge;
Study Bible
Additional Laws
9"Remember what the LORD your God did to Miriam on the way as you came out of Egypt. 10"When you make your neighbor a loan of any sort, you shall not enter his house to take his pledge. 11"You shall remain outside, and the man to whom you make the loan shall bring the pledge out to you.…
Cross References
Exodus 22:26
"If you ever take your neighbor's cloak as a pledge, you are to return it to him before the sun sets,

Exodus 22:27
for that is his only covering; it is his cloak for his body. What else shall he sleep in? And it shall come about that when he cries out to Me, I will hear him, for I am gracious.

Deuteronomy 24:11
"You shall remain outside, and the man to whom you make the loan shall bring the pledge out to you.
Treasury of Scripture

When you do lend your brother any thing, you shall not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

When

Deuteronomy 15:8 But you shall open your hand wide to him, and shall surely lend him …

lend thy brother any thing [heb] lend the loan of any thing to thy brother.

(10-13) When thou dost lend.--The law in these verses is evidently the production of primitive and simple times, when men had little more than the bare necessaries of life to offer as security--their own clothing, or the mill-stones used to prepare their daily food, being almost their only portable property. (See Exodus 22:26-27.)

It shall be righteousness.--LXX., it shall be alms, or mercy. In other words, "Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy."

Verses 10-13. - If one had to take a pledge from another, he was not to go into the house of the latter and take what he thought fit; he must stand without, and allow the debtor to bring to him what he saw meet to offer. He might stand outside and summon the debtor to produce his pledge, but he was not insolently to enter the house and lay hands on any part of the owner's property. To stand outside and call is still a common mode of seeking access to a person in his own house or apartment among the Arabs, and is regarded as the only respectful mode. There would be thus a mitigation of the severity of the exaction, the tendency of which would be to preserve good feeling between the parties. If the debtor was needy, and being such could give in pledge only some necessary article, such as his upper garment in which he slept at night, the pledge was to be returned ere nightfall, that the man might sleep in his own raiment, and have a grateful feeling towards his creditor. In many parts of the East, with the Arabs notably, it is customary for the poor to sleep in their outer garment. "During the day the poor while at work can and do dispense with this outside raiment, but at night it is greatly needed, even in summer. This furnishes a good reason why this sort of pledge should be restored before night" (Thomson, 'Land and the Book,' 1:192, 500). The earlier legislation (Exodus 22:25, 26) is evidently assumed here as well known by the people. It shall be righteousness unto thee (see on Deuteronomy 6:25). When thou dost lend thy brother anything,.... Any sum of money he stands in need of, or demanded a debt of him, as Jarchi; money he is indebted to thee, which is the sense of the Septuagint version; and he is not able to pay it, but offers something: in pawn till he can pay it:

thou shall not go into his house to fetch his pledge; which would be an exercise of too much power and authority, to go into a neighbour's house, and take what was liked; and besides, as no doubt he would take the best, so he might take that which the poor man could not spare: and indeed, according to the Jewish canons (k), he could not take any pledge at all, but with the knowledge, and by the leave, of the sanhedrim, or court of judicature.

(k) Misn. Bava Metzia, c. 9. sect. 13. 10-13. When thou dost lend thy brother anything, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge—The course recommended was, in kind and considerate regard, to spare the borrower's feelings. In the case of a poor man who had pledged his cloak, it was to be restored before night, as the poor in Eastern countries have commonly no other covering for wrapping themselves in when they go to sleep than the garment they have worn during the day.24:5-13 It is of great consequence that love be kept up between husband and wife; that they carefully avoid every thing which might make them strange one to another. Man-stealing was a capital crime, which could not be settled, as other thefts, by restitution. The laws concerning leprosy must be carefully observed. Thus all who feel their consciences under guilt and wrath, must not cover it, or endeavour to shake off their convictions; but by repentance, and prayer, and humble confession, take the way to peace and pardon. Some orders are given about pledges for money lent. This teaches us to consult the comfort and subsistence of others, as much as our own advantage. Let the poor debtor sleep in his own raiment, and praise God for thy kindness to him. Poor debtors ought to feel more than commonly they do, the goodness of creditors who do not take all the advantage of the law against them, nor should this ever be looked upon as weakness.
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