Ephesians 6:19
And for me, that utterance may be given to me, that I may open my mouth boldly, to make known the mystery of the gospel,
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(19) That utterance may be given me, that I may open my mouth . . .—This hardly renders the original “that word may be given me in opening my mouth.” The “opening the mouth”—an expression always used of solemn and deliberate utterance—seems taken for granted. What the Apostle desires them to pray for is that “word may be given him”—“the word of wisdom and the word of knowledge, by the Spirit” (1Corinthians 12:8), according to our Lord’s promise (Matthew 10:19-20), “It shall be given you in the same hour what you shall speak; for it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit of your Father that speaketh in you.” Then he adds as a consequence of this—to make known in plainness of speech the mystery of the gospel. For to make known a mystery in simplicity needs not only boldness to speak, but also the knowledge of the true word of God.

The mystery of the gospel.—The word “gospel” being used emphatically is, of course, the mystery of the new and universal grace of God to the Gentiles of which he speaks at large in Ephesians 3:1-10. This was “made known to him;” he desires inspiration “to make it known” to others.

Ephesians 6:19-20. And for me also — See on Colossians 4:3; that utterance may be given unto me — Free liberty of expression, every inward and every outward hinderance being removed; that I may open my mouth boldly — May deliver the whole truth without any base fear, shame, or diffidence, considering how important it is to the glory of God, and the salvation of mankind, that it should be so delivered; to make known the mystery of the gospel — In the clearest and most effectual manner. For which I am an ambassador in bonds — The ambassadors of men usually appear in great pomp: in what a different state does the ambassador of Christ appear! The Greek, πρεσβευω εν αλυσει, is literally, I execute the office of an ambassador in a chain. See on Acts 28:16. As the persons of ambassadors were always sacred, the apostle, in speaking thus, seems to refer to the outrage that was done to his Divine Master in this violation of his liberty.6:19-24 The gospel was a mystery till made known by Divine revelation; and it is the work of Christ's ministers to declare it. The best and most eminent ministers need the prayers of believers. Those particularly should be prayed for, who are exposed to great hardships and perils in their work. Peace be to the brethren, and love with faith. By peace, understand all manner of peace; peace with God, peace of conscience, peace among themselves. And the grace of the Spirit, producing faith and love, and every grace. These he desires for those in whom they were already begun. And all grace and blessings come to the saints from God, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Grace, that is, the favour of God; and all good, spiritual and temporal, which is from it, is and shall be with all those who thus love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity, and with them only.And for me - Paul was then a prisoner at Rome. He specially needed the prayers of Christians:

(1) that he might be sustained in his afflictions; and,

(2) that he might be able to manifest the spirit which he ought, and to do good as he had opportunity. Learn hence that we should pray for the prisoner, the captive, the man in chains, the slave. There are in this land (the United States) about ten thousand prisoners - husbands, fathers, sons, brothers; or wives, mothers, daughters. True, they are the children of "crime," but they are also the children of sorrow; and in either case or both they need our prayers. There are in this land not far from three million of slaves - and they need our prayers. They are children of misfortune and of many wrongs; they are sunk in ignorance and want and we; they are subjected to trials, and exposed to temptations to the lowest vices. But many of them, we trust, love the Redeemer; and whether they do or do not, they need an interest in the prayers of Christians.

That utterance may be given unto me - Paul, though a prisoner, was permitted to preach the gospel; see the notes, Acts 28:30-31.

That I may open my mouth boldly - He was in Rome. He was almost alone. He was surrounded by multitudes of the wicked. He was exposed to death. Yet he desired to speak boldly in the name of the Lord Jesus, and to invite sinners to repentance. A Christians in chains, and surrounded by the wicked, may speak boldly, and "may" have hope of success - for Paul was not an unsuccessful preacher even when a captive at Rome; see the notes on Philippians 4:22.

The mystery of the gospel - notes, Ephesians 1:9.

19. for me—a different Greek preposition from that in Eph 6:18; translate, therefore, "on my behalf."

that I may open my mouth boldly—rather, "that there may be given to me 'utterance,' or 'speech' in the opening of my mouth (when I undertake to speak; a formula used in set and solemn speech, Job 3:1; Da 10:16), so as with boldness to make known," &c. Bold plainness of speech was the more needed, as the Gospel is a "mystery" undiscoverable by mere reason, and only known by revelation. Paul looked for utterance to be given him; he did not depend on his natural or acquired power. The shortest road to any heart is by way of heaven; pray to God to open the door and to open your mouth, so as to avail yourself of every opening (Jer 1:7, 8; Eze 3:8, 9, 11; 2Co 4:13).

Utterance, or speech, viz. both the things I am to speak, and the faculty of speaking as becomes the matter I deliver.

That I may open my mouth; or, in or unto the opening of my mouth, i.e. full and free profession of the truth, without shame or fear.

Boldly; either, freely and confidently, the same as before in other words; or, openly and plainly, in opposition to speaking closely and in secret, Mark 8:32 John 11:14; and so it may have respect to the removing of his bonds, which were the present impediment of his so speaking. And for me,.... This shows the great humility of the apostle, and the sense he had of the greatness of the work of the ministry; and that it is the duty of people to pray for their ministers; and that no man is perfect in this life; and that the more superior members need the assistance of the inferior ones; for this request is made by the apostle not in dissimulation, or as feigning humility and modesty; but in the sincerity of his heart, and from a real sense of his need of fresh supplies of gifts and grace, to fit him for the work and service of Christ:

that utterance may be given unto me, or "that the word"; meaning not the subject matter of the ministry, the word of the Gospel, the word of faith, truth, and reconciliation, for that was committed to him; unless he should mean an increase of light and knowledge in it; but rather a faculty of speaking it freely and aptly, and what is commonly called elocution; not speaking with the enticing words of man's wisdom, but with the words of the Holy Ghost: or else an opportunity of preaching the word, and liberty to do it, as follows;

that I may open my mouth boldly; or "in the opening of my mouth"; the phrase is Rabbinical. The Jews (w) say, that when Moses came to write that passage, "let us make man in our image", &c. Genesis 1:26, he said before the Lord of the world, why dost thou give , "opening of the mouth", to heretics? i.e. an occasion to them of speaking, objecting to us, and of reproving and convincing us with respect to a plurality of persons in the Deity: and a little after they say,

"wherever you , "an opening of the mouth to heretics", you will find an answer by its side, or along with it.''

Now the apostle desired he might have something to say, to object to, and to reprove and convince the unbelieving Jews; that he might do this with boldness, with all faithfulness with Courage, and intrepidity, and with freedom of speech; or "openly" and "publicly", as the Syriac version renders it:

to make known, the mystery of the Gospel; or the mysterious doctrines of it, such as the doctrines of a trinity of persons, of the union of the two natures in Christ, justification by his righteousness, regeneration by his Spirit and grace, the saints' union to Christ, and communion with him, the resurrection of the dead, &c. which are called mysteries, because they were hid until revealed; and though revealed, the "modus" and "ratio" of them are not to be accounted for. Now the apostle's work was to make known these mysteries, to prove the truth of them from the word of God, and to defend them against the opposers of them; and that he might be able to do this he entreats the prayers of the saints.

(w) Bereshit Rabba, sect. 8. fol. 7. 1. & Vajikra Rabba, sect. 21. fol. 163. 1. Megillat Esther, fol. 94. 1, 3.

And for me, that utterance may be given unto me, that I may open my mouth boldly, to make known the mystery of the gospel,
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
Ephesians 6:19. Καὶ ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ] καί: and in particular. See Fritzsche, ad Marc. p. 11, 713. The special point which, in connection with the intercession embracing all Christians, he would have to be made matter of supplication for himself, is stated in what follows. ὑπέρ expresses, as previously the περί in current use, the sense in commodum (see Schaefer, App. ad Dem. I. p. 190; Buttmann, Ind. ad Mid. p. 188); and only the form of sensuous perception, which underlies the two prepositions, is different, as in the case of the Germ. über and um; comp. 1 Peter 3:18. It is wrongly assumed by Harless that only ὑπέρ expresses in itself the relation of care for, and not περί. The notion of the latter—that of encircling—in fact sensuously embodies such care; hence with classical writers too, especially with Demosthenes, περί and ὑπέρ are interchanged without any difference of sense, e.g. phil. ii. p. 74, 35: μὴ περὶ τῶν δικαίων μηδʼ ὑπὲρ τῶν ἔξω πραγμάτων εἶναι τὴν βουλήν, ἀλλʼ ὑπὲρ τῶν ἐν τῇ χώρᾳ, 10. 16: οὐ περὶ δόξης οὐδʼ ὑπὲρ μέρους χώρας πολεμοῦσι, Xen. Mem. i. 1. 17: ὑπὲρ τούτων περὶ αὐτοῦ παραγνῶναι, Thucyd. vi. 78. Ephesians 1 : ὑπέρ γε τῆς ἐμῆς κινδυνεύειν, ἐνθυμηθήτω οὐ περὶ τῆς ἐμῆς μᾶλλον.

ἵνα μοι δοθῇ κ.τ.λ.] Aim of the καὶ ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ, and consequently contents of the intercession for the apostle (comp. on Ephesians 3:16): in order that utterance may be given to me on the opening of my mouth, i.e. that there may not be withheld from me by God, but may on the contrary be conferred, that which I ought to speak when I open my mouth. That Paul means the speaking with a view to the proclamation of the gospel, is from the context (see ἐν παῤῥησ. γνωρ. κ.τ.λ.) clear. The emphasis, however, is upon δοθῇ, to which, in the sequel, ἐν παῤῥησίᾳ significantly corresponds; for this freedom of speech is the consequence wished for by Paul from that bestowal. Comp. Luke 21:15. As to ἀνοίγειν τὸ στόμα, which in itself represents nothing else than the opening of the mouth to speak, comp. on Matthew 5:2; 2 Corinthians 6:11; on the substantive ἄνοιξις, comp. Thuc. iv. 67. 3. The expression is graphic, and has here something of a pathetic nature, without, however, containing a qualitative feature of the discourse itself, not even the character of unpremeditated utterance (Oecumenius: ἐν αὐτῷ τῷ ἀνοῖξαι ὁ λόγος προήει), which would have been expressed by ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ἀνοίξει τοῦ στ., or in a similar significant way. This at the same time in opposition to Calvin, Boyd, Zanchius, Michaelis, Zachariae, and others, including Koppe, Rückert, Matthies, Meier, Baumgarten-Crusius, de Wette, Bleek, Schenkel, who explain: unreservedly, frankly, which would have to be attached not to what follows (see below), but closely to λόγος, and thereby, again, the ἐν παῤῥησίᾳ γνωρ. would be unwarrantably anticipated. Following Bullinger, Calovius, Cornelius a Lapide, and others,[313] Harless and Olshausen understand the ἌΝΟΙΞΙς ΤΟῦ ΣΤΌΜΑΤΟς as the Acts of God (comp. Ezekiel 3:27; Ezekiel 29:21; Ezekiel 32:22; Psalm 51:17), holding it to denote: the bestowed capacity of speaking in contrast to an earlier bound state of the tongue. Paul would thus have said: “in order that utterance may be given unto me through my mouth being opened.” But what needless diffuseness of expression, since ΔΟΘῇ ΛΌΓΟς and ἌΝΟΙΞΙς ΤΟῦ ΣΤΌΜΑΤΟς would be just the same thing! Kypke and Koppe attach ἐν ἀνοίξει τοῦ στ. μ. to what follows; in which case Kypke regards ἐν παῤῥησίᾳ as epexegesis of ἀνοίξει τ. στ. μ., and Koppe, following Grotius,[314] refers ἐν παῤῥ. to the outward freedom: “non vinculis constrictus in carcere latens.” The latter explanation is logically erroneous, since, thus understood, ἐν παῤῥησ. would be something quite other than the ἄνοιξις τοῦ στόματος, and thus could not be added by way of apposition, without καί; and linguistically erroneous, since παῤῥησία never denotes outward freedom, and here especially its signification of boldness is rendered clear by the παῤῥησιάσωμαι of Ephesians 6:20. Comp. Fritzsche, Diss. II. in 2 Cor. p. 99 f. In opposition to Kypke, it may be urged that an addition of so purely exegetical a character, as ἐν παῤῥ. would be to ἐν ἀνοίξ. τ. στόμ. μ., would not be in keeping with the elevated style of the discourse, which is not couched in anything like a didactic tone. Köster (in the Stud. u. Krit. 1854, p. 317), with whom, in the main, Bleek agrees, attaches ἐν ἀνοίξ. τ. στόμ. μ. to what follows, and takes δοθῇ λόγος in the well-known classical sense: to allow one to come to speech, to let him speak (Dem. 26, 18; 27, 9; 508, 16; 1220, 20; comp. λόγου τυχεῖν, 229, 13); so that Paul is supposed to say: “that opportunity to speak may be given to me, namely, at the opening of my mouth (that is, when I wish to speak) frankly to proclaim,” etc. But even in this way ἐν ἀνοίξει τοῦ στόμ. μου. would be only a needless and cumbrous addition.

ἐν παῤῥησίᾳ γνωρίσαι κ.τ.λ.] with frankness to make known the mystery of the gospel, i.e. the mystery (see on Ephesians 1:9) which forms the contents of the gospel. The opportunity of preaching was not taken from the apostle in his captivity at Caesarea (Acts 24:23), nor yet afterwards at Rome (Acts 28:30 f.). Should we attach ἐν παῤῥ. to what precedes (Vatablus: “ut detur mihi aperto ore loqui libere, ut notum faciam,” etc.), γνωρίσαι would be without a necessary modal definition.

[313] Grotius also regards the ἄνοιξις τοῦ στόματος as the act of God: “sic Deus labia aperire dicitur, ubi materiam suppeditat sibi gratias agendi, Psalm 51:15,” yet makes out of it, after the Rabbinical פתחון פה (see Capell. Spicileg. p. 112; Buxtorf, Lex. Talm. p. 1872), occasione (loquendi) data. But the sense, “opportunity to speak,” could only so be brought out in the event of the words running thus: ἵνα μοι δοθῇ ἄνοιξις τοῦ στόματός μου.

[314] “Ut ab hac custodia militari liber per omnem urbem perferre possem sermonem evang.,” etc.

REMARK.

If the Recepta δοθείη were genuine, the statement of aim, introduced by ἵνα, would be adduced from the mind of the persons praying, thus in the character of the oratio obliqua. See on Ephesians 1:17.Ephesians 6:19. καὶ ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ: and for me. καί has here its adjunctive force, in the special form of appending the particular to the general (Win.-Moult., p. 544), = “and for me in particular”. Paul passes from the requirement of intercession for all to that of intercession for himself, and that with a view to a special gift from God, to wit, freedom of utterance in preaching. The περί of the former clause becomes ὑπέρ in the present. This suggests the existence of some distinction between the two preps., and some have attempted to show that ὑπέρ alone expresses the idea of care for one, while περί denotes a more distant relation (Harl., etc.). But it is impracticable to establish either that or any other tangible distinction. ὑπέρ may be, generally speaking, more applicable to persons, and περί to things. But here both are used of persons. Even in classical Greek they were often used as if interchangeable (e.g., Demosth., Phil., ii., p. 74, 35), and in later Greek, both biblical and non-biblical, they seem to have lost any distinction they once may have had.—ἵνα μοι δοθείῃ [δοθῇ] λόγος: that to me may be given utterance. The δοθείῃ of the TR rests on very slender cursive evidence; δοθῇ is read by [854] [855] [856] [857] [858] [859] [860] [861] [862] [863], etc., and must be substituted. A few authorities place μοι after δοθῇ ([864] [865], d, e, f, vg, Victor., etc.); but in most it is inserted before it. δοθῇ has the position of emphasis—the utterance for which they were to pray in Paul’s behalf is regarded as a gift from God. For this use of λόγος cf. 1 Corinthians 1:5; 2 Corinthians 11:2.—ἐν ἀνοίξει τοῦ στόματός μου: in opening my mouth. Not “that I may open my mouth” (AV), but “when I open my mouth”. The ἐν marks the occasion of the action, and the action itself is that in which the gift (δοθῇ) of Divine help is sought. The phrase ἀνοίγειν τὸ στόμα does not of itself denote any special kind of utterance, whether unreserved (Calv., De Wette, etc.), unpremeditated (Oec.), or other. If it conveys in any case the idea of a certain quality of speech, that is due to the context; as in 2 Corinthians 6:11, where it is conjoined with the phrase ἡ καρδία ἡμῶν πεπλάτυνται. It means simply the opening of the mouth to speak, or the act of speaking; but both in the OT and in the NT it appears to have a certain pathetic (Mey.), or rather solemn force (Ell.), being used of grave and important utterances on which much depended (Job 3:1; Daniel 10:16; Matthew 5:2; Acts 8:33; Acts 18:14).—ἐν παρρησίᾳ: with boldness. Statement of the thing specially sought, and recognised as to be obtained only by the gift of God, to wit, fearless, confident freedom whenever occasion came to preach the Gospel. παρρησία primarily = freedom in speaking (Acts 4:13; 2 Corinthians 3:12); then frankness, unreserve, or plainness in speaking (Mark 8:32; John 10:24; John 11:14; John 16:25, etc.); and boldness, assurance, as opposed, e.g., to αἰσχύνεσθαι (Php 1:20; 1 John 3:21; 1 John 5:14); and with the fundamental idea of freedom or confidence in speaking again suggesting itself (1 John 2:28; 1 John 4:17; see also under Ephesians 3:12 above).—γνωρίσαι τὸ μυστήριον [τοῦ εὐαγγελίου]: to make known the mystery [of the Gospel]. The τοῦ εὐαγγελίου of the TR has large support ([866] [867] [868] [869] [870] [871] [872], Vulg., Syr., Copt., etc.). It is omitted by [873] [874]gr[875], Victor., etc., and is deleted by LWH. The gen. is probably that of contents, or one of the various forms of the gen. possess., = the mystery contained in the Gospel or belonging to it. On μυστήριον see under Ephesians 1:9 above.—The connection of the several clauses in this verse is variously understood. Some connect ἐν ἀνοίξει τοῦ στόματός μου with the following ἐν παρρησίᾳ. So Grotius, who explains it thus—“ut ab hac custodia militari liber per omnem urbem perferre possem sermonem”; but παρρησία does not apply to freedom of movement, and here it has a sense in harmony with the following παῤῥησιάσωμαι. Others attach the ἐν ἀνοίξει closely with the λόγος as a definition of it, = “that utterance may be given me by the opening of my mouth” (Cornel. à Lap., Harl., Olsh., Von Soden, Abb., etc.). This makes the “opening of the mouth” the act of God; in support of which interpretation appeal is made to the terms in Ezekiel 3:27; Ezekiel 29:21; Ezekiel 32:22; Psalm 51:15. The absence of the article, and the analogous passage in Colossians 4:3 are also thought to favour this. But the terms in Colossians 4:3 are different—ἵνα Θεὸς ἀνοίξῃ ἡμῖν θύραν τοῦ λόγου, and the construction makes the δοθῇ and the ἄνοιξις τοῦ στόματος practically one and the same thing. The simplest constructions are these two—(1) to connect ἐν παρρησίᾳ with what precedes, and with the λόγος not the ἄνοιξις, = “that utterance, and that with boldness, may be given to me when I undertake to open my mouth with a view to make known the mystery of the Gospel”; and (2) to connect ἐν παρρησίᾳ with what follows, to wit, the γνωρίσαι, = “that to me utterance may be given when I open my mouth, that with boldness I may make known the mystery of the Gospel”. The latter is preferred by Meyer, Ell., WH, etc. It is followed by the RV text, “in opening my mouth, to make known with boldness,” etc.; while the RV margin gives “in opening my mouth with boldness, to make known the mystery,” etc. The former construction gives a good sense for each particular term and a simple connection, if the ἐν παρρησίᾳ is taken to define not the opening of the mouth, but the utterance, the λόγος, which is the main thought. On the whole the latter is perhaps to be preferred, the need of utterance, power of speech, when occasion offers itself to preach, being first mentioned, and this gift of utterance being next defined in respect of its object, viz., to give fearless confidence in making the Gospel known.

[854] Codex Vaticanus (sæc. iv.), published in photographic facsimile in 1889 under the care of the Abbate Cozza-Luzi.

[855] Codex Sinaiticus (sæc. iv.), now at St. Petersburg, published in facsimile type by its discoverer, Tischendorf, in 1862.

[856] Codex Alexandrinus (sæc. v.), at the British Museum, published in photographic facsimile by Sir E. M. Thompson (1879).

[857] Codex Claromontanus (sæc. vi.), a Græco-Latin MS. at Paris, edited by Tischendorf in 1852.

[858] Codex Sangermanensis (sæc. ix.), a Græco-Latin MS., now at St. Petersburg, formerly belonging to the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Its text is largely dependent upon that of D. The Latin version, e (a corrected copy of d), has been printed, but with incomplete accuracy, by Belsheim (18 5).

[859] Codex Augiensis (sæc. ix.), a Græco-Latin MS., at Trinity College, Cambridge, edited by Scrivener in 1859. Its Greek text is almost identical with that of G, and it is therefore not cited save where it differs from that MS. Its Latin version, f, presents the Vulgate text with some modifications.

[860] Codex Boernerianus (sæc. ix.), a Græco-Latin MS., at Dresden, edited by Matthæi in 1791. Written by an Irish scribe, it once formed part of the same volume as Codex Sangallensis (δ) of the Gospels. The Latin text, g, is based on the O.L. translation.

[861] Codex Mosquensis (sæc. ix.), edited by Matthæi in 1782.

[862] Codex Angelicus (sæc. ix.), at Rome, collated by Tischendorf and others.

[863] Codex Porphyrianus (sæc. ix.), at St. Petersburg, collated by Tischendorf. Its text is deficient for chap. Ephesians 2:13-16.

[864] Autograph of the original scribe of א.

[865] Autograph of the original scribe of א.

[866] Codex Sinaiticus (sæc. iv.), now at St. Petersburg, published in facsimile type by its discoverer, Tischendorf, in 1862.

[867] Codex Alexandrinus (sæc. v.), at the British Museum, published in photographic facsimile by Sir E. M. Thompson (1879).

[868] Codex Claromontanus (sæc. vi.), a Græco-Latin MS. at Paris, edited by Tischendorf in 1852.

[869] Codex Sangermanensis (sæc. ix.), a Græco-Latin MS., now at St. Petersburg, formerly belonging to the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Its text is largely dependent upon that of D. The Latin version, e (a corrected copy of d), has been printed, but with incomplete accuracy, by Belsheim (18 5).

[870] Codex Mosquensis (sæc. ix.), edited by Matthæi in 1782.

[871] Codex Angelicus (sæc. ix.), at Rome, collated by Tischendorf and others.

[872] Codex Porphyrianus (sæc. ix.), at St. Petersburg, collated by Tischendorf. Its text is deficient for chap. Ephesians 2:13-16.

[873] Codex Vaticanus (sæc. iv.), published in photographic facsimile in 1889 under the care of the Abbate Cozza-Luzi.

[874] Codex Augiensis (sæc. ix.), a Græco-Latin MS., at Trinity College, Cambridge, edited by Scrivener in 1859. Its Greek text is almost identical with that of G, and it is therefore not cited save where it differs from that MS. Its Latin version, f, presents the Vulgate text with some modifications.

[875] Codex Boernerianus (sæc. ix.), a Græco-Latin MS., at Dresden, edited by Matthæi in 1791. Written by an Irish scribe, it once formed part of the same volume as Codex Sangallensis (δ) of the Gospels. The Latin text, g, is based on the O.L. translation.19. for me] Lit., on behalf of me. This change of phrase, by change of preposition, is perhaps due to the Apostle’s strong personal sense of his need of the help of intercessory prayer.—He wisely covets for his apostolic work the prayers of the obscurest militant believer. Cp. Romans 15:30; 2 Corinthians 1:11; Php 1:19; Colossians 4:3; 2 Thessalonians 3:1; Philemon 1:22; Hebrews 13:18.

utterance] Lit., “word” (logos; Latin versions, sermo); a special deliverance of the Gospel. Cp. 1 Corinthians 1:5.

given] by the inspiring and enabling Spirit. Cp. Acts 2:4; 1 Corinthians 12:8. The Apostle was still as entirely dependent on the heavenly Gift as when his work began.

that I may open] Lit., “in opening of.” “In” such “opening,” as opportunity came by God’s providence, and power came by His grace, the “gift” would be seen.

boldly] Lit., in boldness of speech. The Gr. word has occurred Ephesians 3:12, where see note. Cp. Php 1:20. St Paul was not insensible to the difficulty of a full and open utterance of the Gospel, not least in the Capital of the world. Cp. Romans 1:15-16, and notes in this Series.

the mystery] The sixth occurrence of the word in the Epistle; cp. Ephesians 1:9, Ephesians 3:3-4; Ephesians 3:9, Ephesians 5:32. On the meaning, see on Ephesians 1:9. The special reference here is fixed by the previous occurrences; it is to Divine Redemption in its world-wide scope and eternal issues. Cp. 1 Timothy 3:16.Ephesians 6:19. Δοθῇ, may be given) Paul did not depend on his natural and acquired power.—ἀνοίξει τοῦ στόματος) פתחון פה.—ἐν παῤῥησιᾳ γνωρίσαι, to make known with boldness) Therefore boldness [plainness] of speech is required, because it is a mystery.Verse 19. - And for me. Mark the un-priestly idea; so far from Paul having a store of grace for all the Galatians, he needed their prayers that, out of the one living store, the needful grace might be given to him. That utterance may be given to me, in the opening of my mouth, to make known with boldness the mystery of the gospel. With all his practice in preaching, he felt that every instance of right utterance was a gift - "may be given to me;" especially when great matters were involved - "in the opening of my mouth." To open the mouth denotes an authoritative act of teaching (comp. Matthew 5:2); on such occasions he especially desired boldness, not stormy vehemence, but earnestness, fearlessness in making known the destination of the gospel, once secret, now designed for all (comp. Ephesians 2.). Boldness was needed because the message was so hateful to some and so contemptible to others. Boldly

Connect with to make known, as Rev.; not with open my mouth, as A.V.

Mystery

See on Romans 11:25; see on Colossians 1:26.

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Ephesians 6:18
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