Galatians 4:5
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New International Version
to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to sonship.

New Living Translation
God sent him to buy freedom for us who were slaves to the law, so that he could adopt us as his very own children.

English Standard Version
to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

Berean Study Bible
to redeem those under the Law, that we might receive our adoption as sons.

Berean Literal Bible
that He might redeem those under the Law, so that we might receive the divine adoption as sons.

New American Standard Bible
so that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons.

King James Bible
To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
to redeem those under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

International Standard Version
in order to redeem those who were under the Law, and thus to adopt them as his children.

NET Bible
to redeem those who were under the law, so that we may be adopted as sons with full rights.

New Heart English Bible
that he might redeem those who were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of children.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
That he would redeem those who were under The Written Law, and that we would receive the position of children.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
God sent him to pay for the freedom of those who were controlled by these laws so that we would be adopted as his children.

New American Standard 1977
in order that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons.

Jubilee Bible 2000
to redeem those that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

King James 2000 Bible
To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption as sons.

American King James Version
To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

American Standard Version
that he might redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Douay-Rheims Bible
That he might redeem them who were under the law: that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Darby Bible Translation
that he might redeem those under law, that we might receive sonship.

English Revised Version
that he might redeem them which were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Webster's Bible Translation
To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Weymouth New Testament
in order to purchase the freedom of all who were subject to Law, so that we might receive recognition as sons.

World English Bible
that he might redeem those who were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of children.

Young's Literal Translation
that those under law he may redeem, that the adoption of sons we may receive;
Study Bible
Sons and Heirs
4But when the time had fully come, God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law, 5to redeem those under the Law, that we might receive our adoption as sons. 6And because you are sons, God sent the Spirit of His Son into our hearts, crying out, “Abba, Father!”…
Cross References
Romans 8:14
For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God.

Romans 8:15
For you did not receive a spirit of slavery that returns you to fear, but you received the Spirit of sonship, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!"

Romans 10:4
Christ is the end of the Law, in order to bring righteousness to everyone who believes.

Galatians 3:13
Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law by becoming a curse for us. For it is written: "Cursed is everyone who is hung on a tree."

Galatians 3:26
You are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus.
Treasury of Scripture

To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

redeem.

Galatians 4:21 Tell me, you that desire to be under the law, do you not hear the law?

Galatians 3:13 Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse …

Matthew 20:28 Even as the Son of man came not to be ministered to, but to minister, …

Luke 1:68 Blessed be the Lord God of Israel; for he has visited and redeemed his people,

Acts 20:28 Take heed therefore to yourselves, and to all the flock, over the …

Ephesians 1:7 In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of …

Ephesians 5:2 And walk in love, as Christ also has loved us…

Colossians 1:13-20 Who has delivered us from the power of darkness, and has translated …

Titus 2:14 Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, …

Hebrews 1:3 Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his …

Hebrews 9:12,15 Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he …

1 Peter 1:18-20 For as much as you know that you were not redeemed with corruptible …

1 Peter 3:18 For Christ also has once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, …

Revelation 5:9 And they sung a new song, saying, You are worthy to take the book, …

Revelation 14:3 And they sung as it were a new song before the throne, and before …

that we.

Galatians 4:7 Why you are no more a servant, but a son; and if a son, then an heir …

Galatians 3:26 For you are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus.

John 1:12 But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the …

Romans 8:19,23 For the earnest expectation of the creature waits for the manifestation …

Romans 9:4 Who are Israelites; to whom pertains the adoption, and the glory, …

Ephesians 1:5 Having predestinated us to the adoption of children by Jesus Christ …

(5) To redeem them that were under the law.--To redeem, or ransom, at the price of His death, both Jew and Gentile at once from the condemnation under which the law, to which they were severally subject, placed them, and also from the bondage and constraint which its severe discipline involved.

That we might receive the adoption of sons.--Redemption is followed by adoption. The admission of the believer into the Messianic kingdom, with its immunities from sin and from law, implies an admission into the Messianic family, of which God is the Father and Christ the Eldest Son, "first born amongst many brethren."

Verse 5. - To redeem them that were under the Law (ἵνα τοὺς ὑπὸ νόμον ἐξαγοράσῃ); that he might redeem (Greek, buy off) them which were under the Law. In what way Christ bought God's people off, not only from the curse, but also from the dominion of the Law, has been stated by the apostle above, at Galatians 3:13, "Christ bought us off (Ξριστὸς ἡμᾶς ἐξηγόρασεν) from the curse of the Law by being made on our behalf a curse" (see note). But why, in order to effect this object, was it prerequisite, as it is here implied that it was, that he should be himself "brought under the Law"? The directions which the Law in Deuteronomy 21:22, 23 gave with respect to those "hanged on a tree" were apparently held by Joshua (Joshua 8:29; Joshua 10:26, 27) to apply also to the case of persons so hanged who were not Israelites. If so, does it not follow (an objector may say) that Jesus, even if not an Israelite under the Law, would, however, by being crucified, have fallen under the curse of the Law, and thereby annihilated the Law for all who by faith should become partakers with him, whether Jews or Gentiles? why, then, should be have been brought under the Law? The objection is met by the consideration that, in order that Christ might abrogate the Law by becoming subject to its curse, it was necessary that he should himself be perfectly acceptable to God, not only as being the eternal "Son of his love," but also in the entire completeness of his life as a man, and, therefore, by perfect obedience to the will of God as declared in the Law, under which it had pleased God to place his people. The Law, whatever the degradation which its ceremonial institute inferred for "the sons of God" subjected to it, was, nevertheless, for the time, God's manifest ordinance, to which all who sought to serve him were bound to submit them° selves. They could not be righteous before him unless they walked in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless (Luke 1:6). That we might receive the adoption of sons (i%na th\n υἱοθεσίαν ἀπολάβωμεν); that is, that our adoptive sonship might be actually and in full measure made over to us. The" we" recites God's people; the same persons as those indicated by the preceding phrase, "those which were under the Law," which phrase was not meant to define one particular class among God's people, but to describe the condition in which God's people had been placed. Their Father had put them under the Law with the view of their being at his appointed time bought off from the Law and admitted to the full enjoyment of their filial privileges. This purpose of their Father, signified beforehand in the promises to Abraham, explains the article before υἱοθεσίαν: it was the adoptive sonship which had been guaranteed to them. Hence the use here of the verb ἀπολάβωμεν instead of λάβωμεν: for the prepositional prefix of this compound verb has always its force; generally denoting our receiving a thing in some way due to us, answering to its force in the verb ἀποδίδωμι, repay: sometimes our receiving a thing in full measure (comp. Luke 6:34, 35; Luke 16:25; Luke 18:30; Luke 23:41; Romans 1:27; Colossians 3:24 2John 8). In Luke 15:27 it is receiving back one lost. The second ἵνα is subordinate to the first; the deliverance of God's people from the Law was in order to their introduction into their complete state of sonship. The noun υἱοθεσία does not appear to occur in any Greek writer except St. Paul; though θέσθαι υἱόν υἱὸς θετός, υἱόθετος ὁ κατὰ θέσιν πατήρ, are found in various authors. After the analogy of other compound verbal nouns with a similar termination (ὁρκωμοσία ἀγωνοθεσία θεσμοθεσία, etc.), it means first the act of adoption, as, perhaps, Romans 8:23; Ephesians 1:5; and then, quite naturally, the consequent condition of the adopted child, as in Romans 8:15; Romans 9:4; and this seems its more prominent sense here. Romans 9:4 suggests the surmise that the term had been in use before among Palestinian Jews, with reference to Israel's state under the theocracy, and that St. Paul borrowed it thence with reference to the Christian Church, in which it found a more complete realization. To redeem them that were under the law,.... By whom are meant chiefly the Jews, who are elsewhere represented as in and under the law, in distinction from the Gentiles who were without it; see Romans 2:12 the Gentiles indeed, though they were not under the law of Moses, yet were not without law to God, they were under the law of nature. The law was given to Adam as a covenant of works, and not to him as a single person, but as a federal head to all his posterity; hence he sinning, and they in him, they all came under its sentence of condemnation and death, God's elect not excepted, and who are the persons said to be redeemed; for Christ was not sent to redeem all that were under the law; for as all mankind were included in it as a covenant of works made with Adam, and all are transgressors of it, the whole world is pronounced guilty before God by it, and liable to the curse of it; but not all mankind, only some out of every kindred, tongue, people, and nation, are redeemed by Christ, even all the elect, whether among Jews or Gentiles. The chosen among the Jews seem to be here principally designed; the redemption of them, which is the end of Christ's being sent, intends not only a deliverance of them from sin and Satan, and the world, to whom they were in bondage, but from the law under which they were; from the bondage of the ceremonial, and from the curse and condemnation of the moral law:

that we might receive the adoption of children; by which may be meant, both the grace, blessing, and privilege of adoption, and the inheritance adopted to; both are received, and that in consequence of redemption by Christ; and such as receive the one will also receive the other. Adoption, as a blessing of grace, exists before it is received; nor does the reception of it add anything to the thing itself; it was in God's designation from all eternity, who predestinated his chosen ones unto it by Christ, according to the good pleasure of his will; it was provided, laid up, and secured for them in the everlasting covenant; and is part of that grace given them in Christ before the world began; but sin intervening, whereby the law was broken, obstacles were thrown in the way of God's elect receiving and enjoying this privilege in their own persons; wherefore Christ was sent to redeem them from sin and the law, and by so doing remove these obstructions, that so they might receive this privilege in a way consistent with the righteousness and holiness of God, as well as with his grace and goodness: receiving of it shows it to be a gift, a free grace gift, and not owing to any merit of the creature; faith is the hand which receives it, as it does all other blessings, as Christ himself, grace out of his fulness, righteousness, pardon, &c. and has no more causal influence on this than on any of these; faith does not make any the sons of God, or put them among the children; but receives the power, the authority, the privilege from God through Christ, under the witnessings of the spirit of adoption; whereby they become such, and have a right to the heavenly inheritance, which they shall hereafter enjoy. 5. To—Greek, "That He might redeem."

them … under the law—primarily the Jews: but as these were the representative people of the world, the Gentiles, too, are included in the redemption (Ga 3:13).

receive—The Greek implies the suitableness of the thing as long ago predestined by God. "Receive as something destined or due" (Lu 23:41; 2Jo 8). Herein God makes of sons of men sons of God, inasmuch as God made of the Son of God the Son of man [Augustine on Psalm 52].4:1-7 The apostle deals plainly with those who urged the law of Moses together with the gospel of Christ, and endeavoured to bring believers under its bondage. They could not fully understand the meaning of the law as given by Moses. And as that was a dispensation of darkness, so of bondage; they were tied to many burdensome rites and observances, by which they were taught and kept subject like a child under tutors and governors. We learn the happier state of Christians under the gospel dispensation. From these verses see the wonders of Divine love and mercy; particularly of God the Father, in sending his Son into the world to redeem and save us; of the Son of God, in submitting so low, and suffering so much for us; and of the Holy Spirit, in condescending to dwell in the hearts of believers, for such gracious purposes. Also, the advantages Christians enjoy under the gospel. Although by nature children of wrath and disobedience, they become by grace children of love, and partake of the nature of the children of God; for he will have all his children resemble him. Among men the eldest son is heir; but all God's children shall have the inheritance of eldest sons. May the temper and conduct of sons ever show our adoption; and may the Holy Spirit witness with our spirits that we are children and heirs of God.
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