2 Chronicles 17:11
Also some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents, and tribute silver; and the Arabians brought him flocks, seven thousand and seven hundred rams, and seven thousand and seven hundred he goats.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(11) Broughti.e., continually. Such is the force of the participle.

Presents.An offering, i.e., tribute (minchah;. 2Chronicles 17:5).

And tribute silver.—Rather, and silver, a load, or burden, i.e., a great quantity (massā’), 2Chronicles 20:25. As if, “silver as much as they could carry”—a natural hyperbole. Not all the five states of the Philistines were subject to Jehoshaphat. (Comp. 2Samuel 8:1.)

The Arabians.—‘Arbî’im, here only equivalent to ‘Arbîyîm (2Chronicles 26:7), and ‘Arbim (2Chronicles 21:16). They are in each case grouped with the Philistines. The nomad Bedâwin conquered by Asa (2Chronicles 14:15) appear to be meant here; or else some tribes which recognised the overlordship of Jehoshaphat after his reduction of Edom (2Chronicles 20:22, sqq.).

Brought him flocks.—Comp. Mesha of Moab’s tribute to Ahab (2Kings 3:4).

2 Chronicles 17:11. Some of the Philistines brought presents — They had been subject to Judah ever since David’s time; but, it seems, had neglected this duty in the times of his predecessors, but were now moved by their own fears to perform it. And the Arabians brought him flocks — Either because he had upon some just occasion waged war against them, and subdued them; or because they voluntarily put themselves under his protection, in recompense whereof they sent him these presents; or only as a free acknowledgment of their respect for him.17:1-19 Jehoshaphat promotes religion in Judah, His prosperity. - Jehoshaphat found his people generally very ignorant, and therefore endeavoured to have them well taught. The public teaching of the word of God forms, in all ages, the great method of promoting the power of godliness. Thereby the understanding is informed, the conscience is awakened and directed. We have a particular account of Jehoshaphat's prosperity. But it was not his formidable army that restrained the neighbouring nations from attempting any thing against Israel, but the fear of God which fell upon them, when Jehoshaphat reformed his country, and set up a preaching ministry in it. The ordinances of God are more the strength and safety of a kingdom, than soldiers and weapons of war. The Bible requires use to notice the hand of God in every event, yet this is little regarded. But let all employ the talents they have: be faithful, even in that which is little. Set up the worship of God in your houses. The charge of a family is important. Why should you not instruct them as Jehoshaphat did his subjects, in the book of the law of the Lord. But be consistent. Do not recommend one thing, and practise another. Begin with yourselves. Seek to the Lord God of Israel, then call upon children and servants to follow your example.Some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents - i. e. "some of the Philistines were among his tributaries." Compare 2 Samuel 8:2; 1 Kings 4:21.

Tribute silver - Or, "much silver" - literally "silver of burthen."

The Arabians - The Arab tribes who bordered Judaea to the south and the southeast paid Jehoshaphat a fixed tribute in kind. Compare 2 Kings 3:4 note.

11. Also some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents, and tribute silver—either they had been his tributaries, or they were desirous of securing his valuable friendship, and now made a voluntary offer of tribute. Perhaps they were the Philistines who had submitted to the yoke of David (2Sa 8:1; Ps 60:8).

the Arabians—the nomad tribes on the south of the Dead Sea, who, seeking the protection of Jehoshaphat after his conquest of Edom, paid their tribute in the way most suitable to their pastoral habits—the present of so many head of cattle.

Some of the Philistines; who had been subjects to this kingdom ever since David’s time, but, it seems, had neglected this duty in the times of his predecessors, but now were moved by their own fears to perform it.

The Arabians brought him flocks; either because he had upon some just occasion waged war against them, and subdued them, though the particulars of it be not described in Scripture; or because they voluntarily put themselves under his protection, in recompence whereof they sent him those presents; or only as a free acknowledgment of their respects to him. Also some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents and tribute silver,.... Perhaps those of Gerar, and the parts adjacent, Asa took and spoiled, and made tributary, 2 Chronicles 14:14,

and the Arabians brought him flocks, seven thousand and seven hundred rams, and seven thousand and seven hundred he goats; with which their country abounded; and these might be the Scenite Arabs, who fearing lest Jehoshaphat should fall upon them, and take away their flocks as his father had done, 2 Chronicles 14:15, brought these presents to him.

Also some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents, and tribute silver; and the Arabians brought him flocks, seven thousand and seven hundred rams, and seven thousand and seven hundred he goats.
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
11. tribute silver] R.V. silver for tribute.

the Arabians] Cp. 2 Chronicles 21:16.

flocks] Cp. 2 Kings 3:4.Verse 11. - The presents were probably enough in the nature of tribute, the "fixed rate" of which is sometimes alluded to (1 Kings 4:21; 1 Kings 10:25; 2 Samuel 8:2), but it is doubtful whether the word מַשָּׂא purports to say this. The word means "bearing" or "carrying," and then "a burden, load, or weight." The expression (2 Chronicles 20:25), "more than they could carry away," where this word is used, favours the idea that the meaning here is "silver of great weight." Probably the moral significance and historical interest, whether of this statement respecting the Philistines, or the following respecting the Arabians, lies in the fact that both of them brought, without more ado, their payments, and did not seek to slip out of their engagements with Judah and Judah's king. Note, for confirmation of this view, 2 Kings 3:4, 5. Therefore Jahve established the kingdom in his hand, i.e., under his rule; cf. 2 Kings 14:5. All Judah brought him presents. מנחה, often used of tribute of subject peoples, e.g., in 2 Chronicles 17:11 of the Philistines, cannot here have that signification; nor can it denote the regular imposts of subjects, for these are not called מנחה; but must denote voluntary gifts which his subjects brought him as a token of their reverence and love. The last clause, "and there was to him (he attained) riches and honour in abundance," which is repeated 2 Chronicles 18:1, recalls 1 Chronicles 29:28; 2 Chronicles 1:12, and signifies that Jehoshaphat, like his ancestors David and Solomon, was blessed for walking in the pious ways of these his forefathers.
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